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why do we need to know?????

Discussion in 'A+' started by slipned, Mar 16, 2010.

  1. slipned

    slipned Bit Poster

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    Hi I've just bought a CD Course from a well known company, in it there is a lot of focus on how CPU'S work i.e how the address bus works, the MMC function and so forth!!! even now there questions on binary in the new Comptia exams...... Why on earth do we need to know how the address bus connects with the CPU and how to count in Binary to repair and troubleshoot P.C.'s ???

    Has Comptia finally lost it??
     
  2. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    Because not everyone who embarks on the A+ have worked with computers before.
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  3. slipned

    slipned Bit Poster

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    yeah I agree with you, but like I said, do we really need to know the intricate and complex details of how a cpu works in order to repair a pc????
    I personally think not......CompTia are making thier course objectives far to complex for the real world....
     
  4. Colloghi

    Colloghi Kilobyte Poster

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    At times, the most valuable steps to help resolve an issue, is usually the stuff you least expect or find unimportant at a previous time.
     
    Certifications: A+, MCP 270, 271, MCDST
    WIP: 290
  5. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    The A+ is (bascially) a hardware cert. It covers alot of things, it doesn't really care if you're a field tech, workshop, helpdesk, etc... (even though there are some "specific" A+ certs, but they're more or less the same). And some people will go on to be hardware specialists or go into R&D.

    The A+ basically covers all the bases.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  6. Col

    Col Byte Poster

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    I dunno. When I was doing my A+ I actually found getting to know that stuff kind of useful. My feeling is that if you actually have an understanding of what's physically happening (or supposed to be happening) 'under the hood' then you're probably going to be able to troubleshoot any problems that much more successfully (and quickly)
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+ MCP MCDST MCITP
    WIP: CCENT Security+
  7. slipned

    slipned Bit Poster

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    but when do we repair a cpu?
     
  8. skulkerboyo

    skulkerboyo Megabyte Poster

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    I thought some of the material was pointless but looking back I realise it smoothed over many many gaps in my knowledge. I'm glad of it really

    Just because you don't perceive it as useful doesn't mean it ain't. It is a ball ache memorising tables of stuff though when you get the feeling you may never need to reel off the size of the L2 cache on an AMD k6-2

    It didn't have L2 intil the k6-2+. See I used some of it!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2010
    Certifications: MCITP:SA, MCSA 03, MCSA 08, MCTS(680+648),A+,N+,ITILV3 Foundation, ITIL Intermediate: Operational Support and Analysis
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  9. AgentDRL

    AgentDRL Nibble Poster

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    I've never repaired a CPU, but I found myself learning loads doing the A+. And a lot of it wasn't on my degree when I was doing that.

    I already had 3 years or so IT experience when I did the A+, and although there was plenty I did know, there was a fair bit I didn't know.
     
    Certifications: ITIL v3, A+, Network+
  10. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    If you get a job as a hardware tech then you might have to.

    personally I believe you need to know how the address bus etc works. Learning about computers and IT is a long process and if you want to learn the advanced stuff you must first start with the basics as is true about nearly everything else in life.

    BTW the binary will help prepare you for subnetting for the network +
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2010
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  11. Josiahb

    Josiahb Gigabyte Poster

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    This.

    Having an understanding of the various Buses etc informs a lot of what you'll do as a tech, you'll find knowing CPU features useful as well as there is software out there which will only operate if a particular feature is available. Knowing these things will make you a better tech, trust me.

    The Binary will be helpful for other things as well as subnetting, remember everything your PC does is actually done in binary so your bound to come into contact with it at somepoint.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, MCDST, ACA – Mac Integration 10.10
  12. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Considering your multiple replies on this forum and another one that I frequent, it sounds like you just want people to agree with you that you won't need to study it and that CompTIA has indeed gone off the deep end. I hope that I am wrong about that, and that you truly do want real answers, even if they differ from what you had expected.

    The question is this... do you want to continue to resist learning this information, despite being advised that the information will likely be beneficial to you... or do you want to listen to the truth that is being given to you by people who are already in IT? :)

    Study it, bro. It won't kill you, and it just might make you a better tech. :thumbleft
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  13. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Ultimately, does it matter? The fact is, it is on the syllabus. Assuming you actually want the cert (and I have to assume that you do since you are studying it), you either get on with it, or choose to not study that material and take your chances with your money on exam day.

    The choice is yours.
     
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation; MCTS: Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010, Administration
    WIP: None at present
  14. slipned

    slipned Bit Poster

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    ok thanks for all your advice.... guess I better knuckle down and start learning it....
     
  15. j1mgg

    j1mgg Kilobyte Poster

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    Its one of these things.

    In nearly everything you have to learn there is stuff that you dont feel relevant, but it is good to have a steady foundation to start of on.
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, ITIL V3 Foundation, MCDST, 70-270, 70-290
    WIP: 70-291, security+ and SSCP
  16. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    And that is exactly it: it is the foundation upon which the rest of your knowledge is built. For example, years from now, you'll know what it truly means when they say "a 128-bit processor" - you'll KNOW why that's important and what benefits it will provide.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  17. LukeP

    LukeP Gigabyte Poster

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    This bit got me excited for some reason :dry
     
    WIP: Uhmm... not sure
  18. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    It'll have been the number that did it :D:twisted:
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?

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