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Which provider? What about e-learning centre?? any opinons?

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by arinissa, Aug 11, 2005.

  1. arinissa

    arinissa New Member

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    Hi I'm reletivily new to It and am looking at a variety of options.

    One is Programming and the other is network support leading to a more security based role.

    I've looked at a range of providers and trainers including the dreaded computeach which I almost signed up for and CERCO, JCB and Trainingcamp. All seemed overpriced and didn't offer that much for my money. So i went to this forum and took some advice.

    Firstly i bought a C training book for about £40 and have been merrily working through it, found i enjoy it and will finish the book then look around for some sort of certification which proves i can do it and looks nice on my CV. Then i might well do C++ online possibly through the e-learning centre.

    Secondly i looked at straight on line courses. The best price wise i've come accross seems to be the E-Learning centre though i can find no info on this at all. I am tempted by their couse bundle but primarly want to do Comptia A+ and Security Plus followed eventually by the MCSE Security or the Cisco course.

    Has anyone got any opinion on this training provider or can offer me other options? Any advise at this stage will be greatly appreciated.

    One thing i have noticed about CERCO, Computeach etc is they seem to offer a recruitment companies services (help with CV interview technique etc) as part of the course. Do normal IT recuriment companies offer this anyway when you register with them? Help with my CV and interview technique is direly needed!! However i do not see why i should pay over the odds for this.

    Cheers in advance

    Arinissa
     
  2. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    Hi,

    Welcome to the forums, I'm new today as well :biggrin The first post I made was in the introductions forums, maybe you should go and say hello and introduce yourself over there.

    Have you decided whether you want to go down the programming or network admin/security route? If you're enjoying learning C and want to become a network admin/security why don't you look into learning UNIX or LINUX? This way you can utilise your programming skills as a network administrator. I don't think C and C++ will help you much with windows administration but I'm no MCSE so I may be wrong.

    If you're at the beginning of your 'journey' try sticking to one thing at a time.

    I've just completed a computing degree foundation with the open university which was a really good grounding in computing in general from computing history to hardware to Operating systems to basic programming to encryption and the ethical side of privacy vs. surveillance- very interesting stuff. All at a very rudimentary level but above all it really helped me decide which direction I want to specialise in. I went in wanting to become a game programmer and came out deciding to take a CCNA with a view to getting into VoIP network convergence projects.

    Without that course I'd still be sitting on a helpdesk (where I still am now and will be for the forseeable future) wondering what direction my carreer was going in. Now I have no doubts what I want to do. In 6 years of IT support I've never felt as focused as I do now.

    Having made that decision I found an excellent course for a very reasonable price. I'm sure if you decide on what course to start on you'll find the right one through these forums.

    As far as the CV and interview technique I found a very very good CV technique page here:

    http://www.contractoruk.com/news/00405.html

    There are countless websites that help with interview technique, no recruitment agencies should be charging you to help you with that, if an agent has found you an interview it is in their interest to help you pass it, anyone that charges to help you with these things is not someone I would deal with.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  3. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I'm cutting in here. Thanks for that link, Pete. Members are always looking for resources of this sort. I'm going to put it in a pinned (permanently on top) post in the Jobs forum. Cheers, mate (and I bumped up your "reputation" points as well). :)
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  4. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Spot on Pete, but although those things will not help you with Windows Administraton the more basics you understand the more it will help you to discover 'why' things do what they do.

    Excellent link by the way too!

    8)
     
  5. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    Woot! Thanks for the reputation points and nice comments for the link :biggrin

    I have a question completely off topic, sorry for the temporary minor derail but;- as far as CV's go and the qualifications by our names in this forum do NT4 MCPs still count even though MS have discontinued them and no longer recognise them as valid certs?

    Back onto topic- I agree that the programming knowledge will help with understanding the nuts and bolts thus putting you in a great position whatever direction you chose. The small basic amount of programming I learnt on the OU foundation course has really helped me understand subnetting for my CCNA :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  6. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    If I were you Pete I'd have those NT4 Certs on my CV, although its old technology there are a lot of places that still have an NT box sat in the corner somewhere doing something.

    Besides, Having the NT Cert and having a newer cert beside it on the CV will show prospective employers that you are constantly progressing your skills to work with the newer technology.

    For the record, I still list my MCP in Windows 95 on my CV!

    8)
     
  7. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I agree with Simon. There are still quite a few places that use NT. I sometimes wonder how it would work if a younger tech got certified in Windows XP/2003 tried for a job at a place running NT. NT is very different to administer and if you never had experience with it, I can't imagine your 2003 certs would give you a particular leg up. Keep the NT info on your CV. It could net you an interview at least.

    You earned the reputation, Pete01. That is a good resource.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  8. Sarah

    Sarah Byte Poster

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    Hi there. I'm from training industry but as people have maybe seen not biased on this forum.

    Firstly with regards to companiesoffering help with CV's getting jobs etc... a lot of companies offer this service and it is a good idea to get this help, howevr a lot of recruitment companies will help you with this. I would say worry when companies offer you the chance to have a great job, great salary and so on after just taking an A+ this is not true. My company has a recruitment agency as part of the group - and we do help with CV's and getting someone a job but makeit obvious it willonly be a starter as you need the experiance and the cert to get on inh the industry.

    As for e-Learning/online learning I would not reccomend e-Learning center as I have head bad things from them. when looking at elearning make sure you ge the support for example an e-tutor, self paced learning, discussion groups, labs and maybe online classroom sessions.
     
  9. Sarah

    Sarah Byte Poster

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    Excuse the typing - i'm on a dodgy lap top!!
     

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