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What do most small business....

Discussion in 'Networks' started by Boycie, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    The place i used to work for experience (before i landed a full time :biggrin ) used to have a fairly heavy duty set-up.

    i.e general serval for files, e-mail and web server. There were around 25 workstations in that office not including remote sites.

    So, what would be a typical set-up in a small office of say 8-10 workstations.... :blink
     
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  2. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    Hi Boyce,

    I guess it depends on the nature of the business the company is in as well as the size of the operation.

    Most companies will have numerous domain controllers, file servers, backup solutions, print servers etc... but for a company with only 8-10 workstations I am not sure :oops:
     
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  3. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    How much money is available m8. 8-10 workstations is on the limit (according to M$) for a workgroup.

    Personally, I would go with a server/client option as it leaves room for expansion. Email could be hosted by the ISP as could the web site. Your server would effectively be your files server, DC and everything else you need. Or you could just have the server as a member server and make user account on the server for all the users and have them on the same workgroup.
     
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  4. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Oh, as i thought. It really depends on the nature of the business and the amount of users...
     
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  5. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    There is no definitive answer to your question Boyce. That is the reason real world experience is so important.

    They could for example be running in a Windows workgroup i.e. peer to peer, no actual dedicated servers. The users would all use POP3 to download their emails.

    Or, as is very common here on The Gold Coast, they could use SBS, it really packs a lot into a single box, DC, DNS, DHCP, Exchange, ISA, Active Directory, WINS, RRAS, Sharepoint services, TS etc.

    Or you could find them running Mentor Pro (a Unix like OS) and PicLan (a weird NOS) as well as Netware servers :eek:

    Or they may be running Unix or Linux.

    Or they could be running all Macs :D

    As I have said many times, networking is a can of worms, once you take the lid off and have a look, it can be really complicated. That is why we have to specialise and we have to know people that know stuff the we don't.
     
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  6. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    In my opinion I think it would.

    If the company was CAD based for example you would want servers with bigger disk pools etc to hold the data and higher spec machines, where as as a company that used basic office programs you could use a thin client solution to cut down on cost.

    This is just my opinion though! :biggrin

    Networks have such a wide range of options
     
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