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VM ware team problem: Internet access from server 2003 LAN

Discussion in 'Virtual Computing' started by kensaundm31, Oct 24, 2010.

  1. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    Hi,

    I am setting up a virtual 2003 network for training purposes in VMware workstation 7.

    I am having a problem accessing the internet from within the Server 2003 network.

    The host computer is my desktop PC at home which is virginmedia cable.

    I created a 2nd nic for the virtual 2003 fileserver, and made it NAT in vmware.

    I have setup rras in server 2003 and selected the 2nd nic as the access point. (am i right in thinking it doesnt matter what address the 2nd virtual nic is because it goes through my real card anyway?)

    But no internet access. And because it is not on the LAN segment it cant be seen by the 2003 network.

    Can anyone help please?

    Cheers.

    Additional information

    NIC 1 on 2003 sever is LAN1 ip 192.168.0.9 dns is same ip, no gateway
    NIC 2 on 2003 sever is NAT ip 192.168.0.10 dns is 192.168.10.9, no gateway

    even from the server i cannot ping the nic 2!
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2010
  2. Darkfunnyguy

    Darkfunnyguy Byte Poster

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    Use the vmware vitual machine setting for all your pc to the network adapter to Bridge and the gateway ip address has to point to your router.
     
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  3. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    Thanks, but you're going to have to talk to me like im 6yrs old and half my brain has melted. :blink
    I am very confused by the virtual network editor.

    I dont have a router. its a cable modem. I plug it in and it just works.

    Do i need to put the gateway info from the virginmedia network in somewhere?

    Please spell it out for me.

    Cheers
     
  4. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    I decided to change LAN1 to VMnet1 for the server2003/dns/dhcp and workstations.

    Then changed the 2nic rras in the server2003 to VMnet8 NAT.

    But the problem persists: how to make VMnet1 see VMnet8?

    I dont understand how the VMware subnets and all those extra adresses fit in.
     
  5. Darkfunnyguy

    Darkfunnyguy Byte Poster

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    Firstly goto start menu in the bottom left hand corner then click on run then enter cmd in the box and return.

    Now you should be at the command prompt.

    Enter ipconfig /all and enter.

    Now look for Default gateway listed and tell me what is the IP address please?

    Another in Vmware click on VM in menu and scroll down to settings.

    In the hardware tab click on Network adapter.

    In the the network connection click on the radio button which says :-

    Bridged: Connected directly to the physical network.

    Now click on OK.

    Do the same for the rest of your pc machines. :):)
     
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  6. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    oh, cool..

    let me just try.

    this is the ip setup:

    {image deleted by Bluerinse as TMI ;) }
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 31, 2010
  7. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    This would the IPconfig of your host? Do you have internet access from your host? or is this the VM? Also your default gateway is on a different network from your pc... 86.3.155 (host) 86.3.152 (DG) with a class C subnet mask this could give you a problem.

    Aside the configuration of your laptop, in order for your VM's to have access to the internet the VM's have to have valid IP configuration. What Darkfunnnyguy mentioned about bridged mode is true. I would look into that. To find where the setting is, look on the VM's NIC properties under the VMware Workstation application. This would be your first step. Get that working before you start setting up RRAS and any other types or routing.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
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  8. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    Yes that ipconfig command was run from my host desktop pc. Yes, i have broadband internet from my host.

    But I thought bridged gives you a real (actual) presence on the host network and you need an address from your provider.

    I just wanted all the nics on my virtual server 2003 network to be self-contained, except for the 2nd nic in the server which i thought could share my host ip adress and give access to the other nics via rras.

    What is confusing me is the extra ip/dns/dhcp stuff from vmware, and how it fits in with my server 2003 ip/dns/dhcp and the actual host ip/dns/dhcp. Like three layers of the same stuff!!!
     
  9. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Ideally you should be using a router between your home network and Virgin Media (as an example I also use Virgin Media but I have a wireless router in between that acts as my DHCP server and gateway), my internal network has a 192.168.x.x address whilst my external interface (on the Virgin Media box) still has the ISP's assigned address.

    Using a device in between the ISP and your internal network is going to make your life so much easier (and less complicated in the future when you want to add additional devices to your network).
     
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  10. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    As long as you have a NIC whether it be virtual or physical it still requires a different IP address different from your host. A "Bridged" connection setting on your VM simply means that "VMWare uses the physical interface of the Host to directly emulate the virtual interface in the VM"

    More information about the VM Bridge setting can be found here

    With the Bridged setting turned on you can have all your VM's communicating with on the internet.

    Although RRAS does have the ability to distribute IP addresses to it's clients, I would still rather implement at DHCP server and configure RRAS to use the DHCP, that way you avoid making mistakes with duplicate IP's.

    When looking at a VM, don't look at it differently because it's a VM sitting on a host. When you create a VM it really does have it's own IP configuration settings and acts like it's own entity. It's as if you had 3 physical servers instead of 3 virtual, you would configure them with a different IP address, and keep the DNS and Default Gateway the same unless they are on a different network.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
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  11. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    I dont understand why all the vm nics should be bridged? I thought just the rras nic 2 in the server need outside world.

    Heres a dodgy visio representation of what im trying to achieve...

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Darkfunnyguy

    Darkfunnyguy Byte Poster

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    On your vmware server configure the tcp/ip setting with both dhcp and dns to obtain ip address automatically . goto command prompt by clicking on run and enter cmd and press returning.

    Enter ipconfig /all and give us details here?
     
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  13. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    You are making this way, way more complicated than it needs to be. The only real reason you would use NAT in a vmware workstation environment is to segment your machines off for security or routing reasons. You are being outrageously hamstrung by not having a router - my advice is to stop fiddling around trying to put square pegs into round holes and buy a router. It will cost you about thirty quid - and is absolutely invaluable in securing and sharing your connection.

    Once you've got your router, let that handle the internet connection and NAT to the outside world, configure your server as a DC, let that handle the internal addressing for your clients and configure forwarders to your ISP's DNS. Simples

    Your goal here should be to learn about what a 'real' environment looks and feels like - you aren't going to achieve that by implementing your lab in a way that is never going to be used in the real world.

    PS: Since you don't even have the protection of a NAT router, I suggest that you remove or blank out the IP addressing information in your screenshot. Sticking your public IP up on a forum is dangerous at the best of times - doing so whilst simultaneously advertising that you don't have a firewall is just begging to be pwned.
     
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  14. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    I've got a wireless router from virgin, will that do. I'll get that out.

    So if I do that will my host be a computer on the virtual network?

    More dumb questions to follow...:rolleyes:

    I've installed the router (not using wireless).

    the goalposts have moved. I dont know what to do next...
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  15. Darkfunnyguy

    Darkfunnyguy Byte Poster

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    You have to try and connect to router setup wizard so you can enter your username and password in order to connect to the internet. So you will have the guesss the default gateway to get to the setup wizard so here goes.

    Goes to your browser and enter the ip addresses in 192.168.1.1 and 192.168.1.254 in the url address as it likely to be either to get into the setup wizard of the router.

    So let me know what has happened.
     
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  16. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    Right I got the router working and can access the router config webpage. There was a shortcut on the device page in windows 7. I think I really like win7.

    In VMware I can acces the internet from a clean xp install (NON-Domain pc) withVMnet0.

    Im not sure how the server2003 network fits in.

    So how does most corporate intranets access the web. I thought it was rras. But I heard of ISA.


    I've just started to work through the MCSE so I have a lot to learn...
     
  17. Darkfunnyguy

    Darkfunnyguy Byte Poster

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    I have to be honest you, you should be startiing with CompTIA A+, Network+ and MCDST before you anywhere near the MCSE. :rolleyes::rolleyes:
     
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  18. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    This.

    The MCSE is designed for people with a year or more of actual server administration experience in a multi-site, multi-server domain environment.
     
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  19. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    Yeah, but I havent got a problem with 2003 and I have loads of time and a million cbtnuggets videos and training mannuals. I wont take the exams for a long time.

    The problem I am having is how VMware fits in.

    But yes, i think ill look at that CompTIA Network +

    Ill figure it out eventually...
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  20. kensaundm31

    kensaundm31 Bit Poster

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    Ok, I had to re-install everything cos vmware decided the disk was knackered.

    I've got the basic networking sorted:
    I can access the internet from xpclients in the domain and i can access the internet from the server.

    But before i get to the issue im having here is a picture representing how i set it up:


    [​IMG]


    The clients can ping the internet-facing nic in the server. but they cannot ping the router or my physical host pc, but they can ping the internet

    The other thing is that my physical host pc can only ping the internet-facing nic, it cant ping the vm lan.

    some more info:

    I have 2 network cards in the virt server.

    LAN1 (VMware LAN segment) - 192.168.1.10 (NO gateway defined)

    OUTBOUND (VMware host bridge) - 192.168.1.11 (19.168.1.10 gateway defined)

    XP clients gateway is 192.168.1.10

    No gateway defined in DHCP

    I use rras simply to set nic 2 (bridged to my host) as the internet facing device.

    In the outbound nic in rras 'general/configuration' II set the default router to the physical router 192.168.1.1

    I have disabled all firewalls in the domain until i can sort this out so it isnt that.

    Please does anyone have any ideas as to what the problem is?
     

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