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Telephone interview!

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Ddan, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Ddan

    Ddan Nibble Poster

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    Hi guys

    I have a telephone interview for a Graduate Support Analyst role, they told me that the interview will be based around my CV with no technical questions not sure whether to believe that or not .....will it solely be questions based around my CV or should I expect non related questions also.

    thanks guys.
     
  2. Apoc220

    Apoc220 Byte Poster

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    Hey,

    It is anyone's guess what they will throw at you, to be honest. However, I'd say that it is a safe bet that they may ask you technical related things regarding what you put on your CV. For example, if you put something like "consolidated main database in business xyz" then they might ask you to explain to them what that entailed. There is nothing stoping them from throwing a technical question or two, but if they said they wont then I wouldnt be too worried about it. I'd say walk in there expecting technical question and if they don't then even better. One strategy might be to look over your CV and make sure that you are confident in discussing the bullet points. If there is something that you are a little rusty on in your resume do a little reviewing so if they ask you a question about it you will have something to say. My strategy for interviews is to walk in over prepared so I am ready for whatever they may throw at me. Anyway, best of luck!
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2012
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  3. shadowwebs

    shadowwebs Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    If you have got this far for them to want to give you a telephone interview, and that your application / cv (resume) is all true then you have nothing to worry about.

    Just be honest and I wish you all the best of luck.
     
    Certifications: compTIA A+, Apple Certified Technical Coordinator 10.10 (OS X Yosemite, Server and Support)
  4. Ddan

    Ddan Nibble Poster

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    Thanks for the advice guys, but what if they ask me a technical question which I dont know the answer to?
     
  5. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Tell them you don't know the anwer.
     
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  6. Jiser

    Jiser Kilobyte Poster

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    Make sure you know your CV inside and out. Come up with a list of questions to ask them. Seem interested and keen, maybe even put on a shirt and tie to make it seem proper. Have no distractions around and let people know you live with your having an interview.

    You don't state about your work history but I would imagine they would throw in some technical related items if you have a previous tech job. Would probably expect some questions about prioritisation, ability to deal with difficult people - what would you do?, how you got to where you are today, where you want to be in the future and why the job your applying for?

    As said before if somebody asks you something you dont know, dont BS, tell the truth. Ive been asked this and I say 'I am sorry I don't know the answer to that.' ;)
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), PGc, MCTS:Win 7, MCSA W7/MCITP EDST, ITIL Foundation, Prince 2 Foundation, C&G: Web Design, MOS 07: Excel, Word, Powerpoint, Outlook.
  7. Ddan

    Ddan Nibble Poster

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    Did you get the job after telling them you didnt have the answer?
     
  8. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Yes. In fact I got this job after admitting I didn't know the answer (I took a guess at the answer, and was dead wrong too, but prefixed it with "I don't know").

    Ultimately it depends on the question and the interviewer. If it is something they believe you absolutely should know the answer to, then you probably wont get the job. If it is something they think you should know, but can easily be taught, then getting it depends on the other stages of interview, and the other questions.

    In either circumstance, it doesnt matter. Guessing the answer, and trying to pass it off without telling them you don't know isn't going to win you any points. It will just make you look like an utter **** when you fail to provide the correct answer.

    What do you think is worse? Someone confidently stating an answer as if they know it, and being wrong; or someone confidently admitting that they don't know the answer, but know how to find out?

    Of the two, who do you think is a much more confident person in the workplace? The person willing to lie/guess and pass it off as if they know things they don't; or the person willing to admit when they don't have the expertise/knowledge - and are willing to seek appropriate assistance? Which would you rather have working for you in a company? Which is less likely to royally screw up your entire system?
     
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    Arroryn likes this.
  9. Apoc220

    Apoc220 Byte Poster

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    This. I can relate to it by a phrase that I was taught a while back and serves me to this day. I don't know, but I will find out. You don't want to leave the answer at "I don't know". It doesn't show initiative or willingness to learn. The two ways to go about it (for me, anyway) are

    1. "I don't know, to be honest, but if I had to find out I would make use of any resources available to me." Be it the internet, colleagues, technical documentation, etc. Chances are that you'll have access to one or the other in any troubleshooting situation. An answer around those lines will be better than a straight "I don't know"

    2. If it's something you are rusty on or feel that you can wing then let them know! Tell them it's something you're rusty on or just say you're not too sure, but if you had to guess it would be xyz. Like Fergal said, sometimes they don't care about the 100% right answer. More times than not they want the person right for the job, not the person who gets 100% of the questions right and knows everything. You want to show them that you have a willingness to learn and have a passion for your job. That makes up for lack of knowledge in many cases!
     
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  10. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    Just be yourself and speak slowly with confident and listen to what the interviewer is saying using reassurance that you're listening. Lastly, be honest with your answers. Finally, sit back and wait for the response.

    All the best:)
     
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  11. Ddan

    Ddan Nibble Poster

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    Great advice guys thank you.
     
  12. Ddan

    Ddan Nibble Poster

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    Hi guys

    Personally I do not think it went well, because I was very nervous and the interviewer picked up on it.Surpisingly he said he wanted to see me for a face to face interview.
     
  13. Boffy

    Boffy Megabyte Poster

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    Congrats! Your through to the second stage, time to 'man up' as communication is key to 1st line support. Helpdesk is no place to be shy.

    I'm not the loudest person, but you need to understand that they're looking for someone who will confidently communicate with users regarding a situation.

    If you really don't feel it went well, consider this your second lifeline 8)
     
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  14. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    It's difficult to gauge how telephone interviews go - you can infer a lot about a person through their body language. If it's a phone-based role, maybe they just want to make sure their staff won't sound like Joe Pasquale :)

    If it helps, I had a phone interview (my first ever one) with a couple of questions I had to stumble over, but got a face to face interview that had a proper technical test, and ended up getting the role.

    Good luck :)
     
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  15. Ddan

    Ddan Nibble Poster

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    Thank you for the advice is it better to send a thank you email after the telephone interview stage or wait till after the face to face?
     
  16. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Wait till after the face to face....
     
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