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Superscalar technology vs HTT

Discussion in 'A+' started by aestudiar, Feb 6, 2010.

  1. aestudiar

    aestudiar Byte Poster

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    Hi,
    what exactly is the difference between superscalar technology and HTT (Hyper-Threading Technology)?
    As I understand them, they both result in multiple instructions being processed. :eek:
     
  2. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    Seems like HTT is an Intel branded name.
    Superscalar technology is the name for the overall concept.

    At least thats my vague understanding of it.
     
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  3. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Superscalar is not one technology, it is a series of advancements that were starting to be put into processors after CISC and RISC. These advancements allowed multiple concurrent instructions to be executed at once. The most common features associated with Superscalar processors are a deeper and wider pipeline and more functional units than processors before.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superscalar

    Hyperthreading is Intel specific hardware that allows one core to appear as two virtual processors by having hardware to allow for a fast context switch by duplicating the hardware that stores the processor cores state.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyper-threading
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2010
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  4. derkit

    derkit Gigabyte Poster

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    Looks like I was aiming for the correct forest, whilst dmarsh hit the correct tree!
     
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  5. aestudiar

    aestudiar Byte Poster

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    I suppose AFTER here means in time, after the CISC and RISC were introduced. Surely CISC/RISC is run in conjunction with Superscalar Technology? :blink
     
  6. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    They are all historic terms relating to Microprocessor design, there is no such thing as a pure CISC, RISC or superscalar design, modern processors are hybirds of the design approaches covered by these terms.

    Generally the thinking as a timeline tended to go CISC -> RISC -> Superscalar -> Hybrid, but of course in reality like the emergence of any new ideas things were more complex.

    I'm always interested in learning the history of things, Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science, Engineering, Religion, by understanding the history, the motivations, the characters, the context at the time, you get a much better understanding of the subject.

    http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/pa-microhist.html
     
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  7. aestudiar

    aestudiar Byte Poster

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    Yep, you are right. I also like analyzing the past. I finished a course on 'How the Universe works' last week. It involved a lot of theory, and elements at the quantum level: quarks, baryons, etc.

    From these very small elements the whole Universe was formed, which is quite fascinating. :)
     
  8. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    My point was yes learn the subject and be fascinated by it, but also understand where the ideas come from, how were the results obtained, what political infighting happened, what caused a change in thinking, how are new ideas discovered, what was the scientific method or thought process involved ? etc.

    An example might be the discovery of Calculus, the split in europe over who should get credit, this would help explain why we have both Newton and Lebiniz notation.

    How did alchemy turn into chemistry ?

    Other examples might be the early church and Copernicus/Galileo etc.

    Modern western historians first dated civilisation as 2000 years old because of christian influences and because they define 'civilisation' as people who build large permanent stuctures, now some people think civilisation may go back 20,000, 40,000 or even 200,000+ years etc depending on your definition.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2010
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  9. aestudiar

    aestudiar Byte Poster

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    I got your point in the first round. :)
    I was just pinpointing something I completed last week.

    By looking at how things evolve we can obtain a deeper knowledge of them. Ultimately, this is intimately related to how things don't come separate, but as a whole. (Hence reductionism practices are being replaced by holistic ones).

    Books I've recently read on the topic: Linked and The world is flat.
     

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