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Super network resources

Discussion in 'Networks' started by Dazzo, Mar 24, 2014.

  1. Dazzo

    Dazzo Byte Poster

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    Hi Guys,

    I need some details on creating a super network and seeing if you guys have done it before or, if you have any resources that could help me?

    Looking to create a super network of 192.168.124.0 255.255.252.0 including 192.168.125.0 192.168.126.0 and 192.168.127.0.

    Thanks,
    Daz
     
    Certifications: A+, MOS: Master 2010, Network +
  2. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Creating it where? on what? why?

    I mean theoretically you should just need to create a range of 192.168.124.1 - 192.168.127.254 /22 but without know on what device you're trying to do this on we can't help you more.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  3. Dazzo

    Dazzo Byte Poster

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    Hi Simon,

    Sorry I was a bit vague, reading stuff on the net at the same time, trying to find out more on how to do it.

    Wanted to see if it was possible for work to merge Class C networks so they can talk to each other and add an additional one for future additions if any.

    The router acting as a gateway will be a Cisco RV016 but I'm not sure if this can handle it. Will be putting servers and printers etc on the 124 address, DHCP and workstations on 125 leaving 126 as the spare range of addresses and using 127 range for the phones, although these don't need to be connected.

    Currently have servers running 2003 2008 and 2012, PC's and laptops with win xp win 7 and one win 8.

    I have tried doing it with two machines, one as 192.168.124.225 /22 and the other as 192.168.125.225 /22 with the same default gateway (cisco) on 192.168.124.254 /24 with an additional subnet of 192.168.124.254 /22.

    From what I've read, in theory it sounds easy and to just set the ip's with a super network subnet, /22 in this case but there is obviously something or a lot I am missing.
     
    Certifications: A+, MOS: Master 2010, Network +
  4. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    I would strongly suggest keeping them to a dedicated subnet and use routing to keep things easier but that's your call.

    As far as your gateway is concerned and if you're going down this route of using the /22 then you would need to have a subnet in the /22, I would suggest something like 192.168.124.1 as the gateway and then using that across your entire range, the gateway address should be common to all devices on the /22 network.

    I would also suggest you look at VLAN's to ensure that you keep your servers off the same lan segment as your printers\workstations etc, you don't want anyone to have the chance of sniffing the network for any insecure data from your printers.

    Ideally what you should probably do is change to a 10.x.x.x network with a suitable subnetting scheme in place and do ensure that you seperate your lan segments off, obviously I am not a network engineer so I can only offer this as a suggestion from me personally and how I would expect to do it in the enterprise.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
    Dazzo likes this.
  5. Dazzo

    Dazzo Byte Poster

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    I may steer away from the super network idea for now and stick to routing, with Vlans as you suggested. I need to look into Vlans more as I am unsure on how they work/ on how to apply them.

    I set this up one with an address of 192.168.124.2 /24 and a default gateway of 192.168.124.254(Cisco Router)
    The other with an address of 192.168.125.2 /24 and again a default gateway of 192.168.124.254(Cisco Router)

    I can ping the 125.2 address from the 124.2 machine but not in reverse. A tracert shows the first one goes straight to the gateway then to the machine but the other doesn't make it to the gateway. This is a routing issue correct?
     
    Certifications: A+, MOS: Master 2010, Network +
  6. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    It has no route back, 192.168.125.2 /24 means that it's expecting that the 192.168.125.x network is the routable network and as such trying to use 192.168.124.254 as the gateway simply won't work.

    I would suggest looking at a quick ip networking primer just to give you an idea of default gateways and subnetting.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  7. Dazzo

    Dazzo Byte Poster

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    Thanks Simon, I'll go back over this then and see what I can do.

    Looks like the router doesn't have inter Vlan routing anyway so I might need a different router to do this with.

    :beers2
     
    Certifications: A+, MOS: Master 2010, Network +

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