1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

static IP environment

Discussion in 'Networks' started by JSA ALU, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. JSA ALU

    JSA ALU Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    HI all,
    Please advise me on managing and maintaining Static ip network. We have around 120 desktops and laptops , the biggest issue we are facing is with the Static IP. If i move to DHCP with ISA will there be any problem?...please advise.
     
  2. ChrisH1979

    ChrisH1979 Byte Poster

    225
    9
    37
    DHCP will ease your management of your clients a lot. You only need assign static IPs to your servers.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:SA, MCSA, MCTS:Win 7, Application Infrastructure
    WIP: MCITP:EA
  3. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    As long as a NAT firewall is used shouldn't be a problem along with making sure the addresses fall withing the network mask.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  4. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

    3,748
    330
    187
    There isn't enough information to go on here.

    Why are you using static IP addressing now? There may be perfectly valid reasons for it (an application requires it, or licensing reasons for instance). The police force I worked for required all machines to have a static address for accountability purposes.

    Do you have multiple internal subnets? If so, then do you know how to route dhcp traffic across them?

    Exactly what 'issues' are you facing with static addressing? Provided your netmask provides enough space, and the majority of clients are already staticly assigned, you've got no administrative burden other than keeping track of what's already been assigned, and recording when addresses get retired. In addition, since you dont have any dhcp servers, route already a little more secure than most networks.

    Of course, all this is assuming your clients sit on an internal (non publicly routable) address range. If they don't, then you've got a whole network redesign to do - and putting in a dhcp server is the least of your worries.

    Don't be too quick to dismiss static addressing. It gives you a lot more control over your environment. The paranoid amongst us (me!) likes that!
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  5. JSA ALU

    JSA ALU Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    the problem is we dont have the database of ips being used. is there anyway of pulling it out?
     
  6. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

    3,463
    397
    199
    Use a network scanner to probe the address range.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  7. JSA ALU

    JSA ALU Bit Poster

    12
    0
    2
    i use ip angry to pull out the address , but we are working in shift basis so no follow up
     
  8. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    err why don't you document what you do and get the other people to document what they do?

    it aint rocket science.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  9. chuckles

    chuckles Kilobyte Poster

    371
    6
    49
    If you need to keep some static addresses but also want to use DHCP be sure that the range your DHCP uses does not overlap any static addresses or you could get complaints....
     
    Certifications: '07/'09 A+, N+, S+
    WIP: maybe something Apple

Share This Page

Loading...