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Questions about the Passport A+ Book

Discussion in 'A+' started by UCHEEKYMONKEY, Mar 18, 2007.

  1. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    Does anyone have the A+ Passport book by Mike Meyers?
    If so has anyone used the MasterExam on the cd?

    One of the questions ask about a computer with Windows 98 connected to a network with a NIC. It states the PC has good connectivity but can't get onto to the internet.

    Then asks what would you check.

    Would you check the Router, the Hub, the NIC or Protocols?

    If the computer has good connectivity does this mean the NIC card is working because it is sending and recieving packets?:blink



    Also another question was asked about PCMCIA Cards

    The question asks how many type II cards can be inserted into a type III slot?

    Well I thought type I = Memory, type II = Networking, type III & type IV = Harddrive.

    So why would you put type II card Networking into a type III slot that's HD?

    Unless they are testing your knowledge of how thick the PCMCIA cards are?
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  2. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    A Type III slot can hold one Type III card or any combination of two Type I or II cards .

    For the 98 NIC question I would go with protocols.
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  3. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    Is this because of the widths?

    Is this correct?

    Type I = 3 mm
    Type II = 5 mm
    Type III & IV = 10.5mm?

    The correct answer according to the Master Exam is one card.

    The Correct answer for the network question is the Protocols and the NIC card.

    I can see why you would check the protocols, but why would you check the NIC if it's getting good connectivity?:blink
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  4. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    What they are asking is whether you realise that you need TCP/IP bound to the NIC in order to access the Internet - you can indeed network computers without using TCP/IP, NetBEUI for example but you will not be able to access the Internet.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  5. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Well if connectivity is ok on the LAN then there doesn’t appear to be a problem router, hub or the NIC. Therefore it must be protocols. The process of elimination can help with these questions. :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  6. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    plus the only two obvious components (no mention of any routers or hubs specifically is the question) are indeed the NIC and protocols. If you saw an answer with 127.0.0.1 go for that first, it is the NIC loopback address and will tell you if your NIC is indeed functioning correctly.
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  7. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Well in the real world pinging the loopback address will tell you if the TCP/IP stack is functioning correctly but it wont necessarilly tell you that some hardware component at the physical level on the NIC is bad as no packets actually leave the card - so a bent pin in the ethernet socket could be the problem for example.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)

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