1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Pork pie....

Discussion in 'Internet, Connectivity and Communications' started by Boycie, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Someone in work claims that they have two computers which must have 2 IP addresses from a single port router which is fed to a double outlet RJ-45 box.
    I said both computers will be able to access the internet but not at the same time.
    The person says otherwise..... :blink
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  2. law123

    law123 Byte Poster

    189
    0
    33
    I think he is mixed up slightly. Maybe he thinks is modem is his single port router. And the double port RJ45 is his actual router. Thus he can acces the internet on both at the same time
    What do you think Boyce
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: A+
  3. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    no, he claims his router (a single port netgear) has one rj-45 plug on it which connects to a double outlet RJ-45 plate via cat 5 cabling. He claims both computers can surf at the same time....
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  4. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

    6,199
    125
    199
    If the router acts as a DHCP server then I can't see why it wouldn't work.

    The double outlet RJ-45 box will be acting like a hub.
     
  5. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    oh. But i thought the RJ45 outlet would have seperate inputs for either outlet....
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  6. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

    6,199
    125
    199
    It depends on what you mean by outlet. Something that is attached to the wall usually has two cables wired into it, but I have used splitters before that basically, well, split a single input.

    As they are both using the same cable bandwidth usage could cause problems if both are being used at once.
     
  7. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    ok, thanks for the input Si :thumbleft
    In this instance i can't see how it would work either way because the outlet isn't a hub....
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    As far as I know you cannot split an Ethernet RJ45 cable into two.

    Splitters *do* exist, but they are for ISDN S-Bus, which *is* a bus system. 10base-t or 100base-t is *not* a bus.

    As there are normaly 2 unused pairs in the normal ethernet cable you can use a different type of splitter/combiner to put two connections down one cable, but you need the mirror device at the other end. This only works for 10base and 100base. 1000base uses all 4 pairs.

    So, on the face of it, what he is claiming isn't possible. But the language used suggests he isn't accurately describing things anyway!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  9. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Harry,

    thanks for the reply. I can't see how it would work either. He pointed to an outlet like the ones we have on our office wall. These must be a socket pure and simple. The reason i know this because each RJ45 goes to a different network :biggrin

    So either he is talking through his behind or there is a hub between the Netgear output and twin wall socket!
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  10. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

    6,199
    125
    199
    Just so that you know, this is the sort of thing that I was reffering too. 8)

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    thanks Si. In what type of situation would these cable come in to play :oops
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  12. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

    6,199
    125
    199
    Well, I've only used on once, when I needed to add an extra workstation into a location which only had a single wired point.

    Worked ok, but I'm not sure as to how much traffic ended up going over the link.

    8)
     
  13. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

    8,871
    167
    256
    From my research (googling) I have come to the conclusion that it is possible. There are eight wires in a CAT5 cable but only four are used. TX (transmit) + and TX - and RX (receive) + and RX -

    So, for the cable run, you can get away with one cable but you would need a splitter at both ends. The end that is near the computers would be split and then plug into each NIC. The end of the cable near the switch/hub would also be split and plug into two *separate* ports.

    More info here...

    http://www.duxcw.com/yabbse/index.php?board=2;action=display;threadid=5233

    And here..

    http://www.duxcw.com/digest/Reviews/Network/ats/index.html
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  14. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    This is what I was refering to in this:
    :biggrin

    The snag is that it depends on a special splitter at *both* ends, and in most cases these splitters are rare!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  15. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

    8,871
    167
    256
    Ah yes, now that I have read it over a few times it makes much more sense :blink
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)

Share This Page

Loading...