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Point to Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE)

Discussion in 'Internet, Connectivity and Communications' started by philbenson, Sep 9, 2006.

  1. philbenson

    philbenson Byte Poster

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    I really don't know much about this technology but I'm currently writing an article about VPNs. Now usually, VPNs would require a fixed publi IP address on the VPN server. However I think I've heard somewhere that using PPPoE removes the need to have a fixed IP. Is this correct? and if so why.
     
    Certifications: MCP, MCP+I, MCSE, MCSA, MCTS
    WIP: CCNA(?)
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Hm - it isn't clear to me what sort of stack you have here. PPPoE doesn't have any particular properties I can think of that would make much change, it is basicaly a glue layer.

    What sort of VPN are you thinking here?

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Thinking further on this, the PPP layer above PPPoE will allow the local machine to discover relevant IP addresses.

    If this is on a Ethernet network then you wouldn't need to know IP addresses. I'm not sure how this would work over say DSL, as the PPP and PPPoE layers terminate at the ISP.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  4. philbenson

    philbenson Byte Poster

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    I'm creating a powerpoint presentation on the basics of VPN technology. I need to cover the various types of VPN such as remote access VPN where a remote user can connect to a remote network so long as both are connected to the Internet. In this case the VPN connection is created using either the public IP address of a RAS server configured as a VPN server on the network, or by using the domain name.

    RAS Servers require a fixed public IP address just as internal DNS, DHCP servers etc require a private fixed IP address which clients are then configured to. But before I go ahead and state in the presentation that a fixed public IP address is a necessity, I just wanted to see if there are any alternatives out there which relieve the need for fixed IPs.

    The three VPN scenarios I will include are: RAS VPNs, Router-Router VPNs for connecting two or more private networks, or mixed systems that include a firewall and perimeter network.
     
    Certifications: MCP, MCP+I, MCSE, MCSA, MCTS
    WIP: CCNA(?)
  5. philbenson

    philbenson Byte Poster

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    I should just add that the audience of my presentation will be those preparing for the MCSE exams for MS Server 2003 (70-291 I would think)
     
    Certifications: MCP, MCP+I, MCSE, MCSA, MCTS
    WIP: CCNA(?)
  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Ah - you want the Microsoft slant to it! :biggrin Can't really help with that.

    It seems to me that you are looking at more than VPNs with your classifications there. My view is nicely summed up here which is looking at just VPNs and not all the other stuff that can surround it.

    And if you have a public IP address then you should be able to get to it by name (unless DNS is broken) so the actual IP address doesn't need to be fixed.
    This must be a Microsoft thing, as in the general world this isn't quite true. RAS on a public network can have a domain name. DNS servers don't need to be private, but the client has to know the IP, unless you are using PPP or DHCP. And you don't need to know the IP address of a DHCP server, as the protocol will find it.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  7. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I presume (haven't tried it) that you could use a dynamic DNS provider like dyndns.

    Pete
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)

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