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OSs

Discussion in 'Software' started by bob667, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    Ok guys n gals, the only OSs I've ever used are Win 3.x, 95, 98 and XP. So the question is, out of the following, which ones are still in general use (on a professional level), how long you think it takes to get to grips with them, what the main differences are and any other info you'd like to throw in, thanks very muchly in advance for your help :biggrin

    Not sure if some of these are even OSs, and here goes anyways:
    Citrix
    Unix
    Linux
    Solaris
    Irix
    OS2
    Win 95, 98, ME, NT, 2000, 2003, XP Pro
     
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  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I thought Citrix was a super version of a PCAnywhere-like app.

    Linux, Irix and Solaris are versions of Unix. There *are* differences - but only in detail. And there are many other flavours of Unix out there.

    Harry.
     
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  3. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    So if I swat up on Unix would I know the other versions or would I have to do more work on top to know all the differences.

    Btw, with Win 2000 and 2003 I keep hearing of Server 2000/2003, are all these the same or are there server versions and workstation versions? Cheers mate :thumbleft
     
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  4. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    you will be suprised what is still in use these days. Basically all the OS's you have mentioned are in use but for different things. Citrix is usually used to host apps to thin clients as far as I know. Unix is used on servers and is an alternative to Windows NOS's (Network Operating Systems) like NT, 2000 and 2003 and can be used to host databases, webserver, print server, file server etc.

    OS2 is basically dead, never heard of Irix, Solaris is Linux based and Linux is used at both desktop and server level and is gaining popular support as a desktop with flavours such as Solaris, Debian, Redhat etc. Windows is still used in all versions though 95 is all but dead. If you have used Windows from 95/98 then all versions from there are easy to pick up as they are pretty much similar with a few bells and whistles on. The main Microsoft ones used in business as a desktop I would say are 98, 2000 pro and XP pro.

    Linux is very different from Windows and if you have used Windows then it does take time to get used to Linux. Everyone has their own views on which is the best. I personally am using Ubuntu at the mo which I find really easy to use and setup which I didn't find with other Linux Distro's (Believe me I've tried most of them).

    Hope that helps...:D
     
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  5. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    Cheers guys, that helped alot, time for a spending spree soon methinks :biggrin
     
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  6. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    bob, you can get Linux free if you mean buying some OS's. Have a look at http://www.linuxiso.org/ & http://distrowatch.com/index.php for different distro's and you can download most from there too. As I said before I'm using Ubuntu which I can recommend and can be downloaded free or even sent to you on CD for free at http://www.ubuntu.com/

    As for Unix and Citrix they aren't really for using at home and I would personally start with maybe XP and Linux. NOS's like 2000 and 2003 are pretty expensive to buy as well and you need 2 PC's to get the benefit out of them one running the NOS and the other running a client like XP.
     
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  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Irix is/was the flavour of Unix used by SGI - once the darling of high-end graphical workstations.
    You will give all the Sun people appoplexy with that statement!
    Solaris is based on SysV Unix rather more than on BSD which was their older system (usualy refered to as SunOS). Linux is a mix of BSD and SysV, with a heavy lean towards BSD.
    Otherwise I agree with many of the above comments.

    Harry.
     
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  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    2003 is *only* available as a 'server' version - it's name is in fact "Windows Server 2003".

    2000 was available in server versions, as well as a workstation version. The first is 2000 Server (and there are also more powerfull versions than this) and the second is 2000 Professional.

    Harry.
     
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  9. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    Is Linux compatible with WNT, 2K and 2K3 and what's the minimum spec you'd recommend for 2K3? Also I'm likely to have 7 OSs running on the same system eventually so could you see any problems arising from that? Thanks again for your help guys :biggrin
     
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  10. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    scratch that, make it 8 OSs :eek:
     
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  11. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    On a physical system or virtual? :eek:
     
  12. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Depends on what you mean by 'compatible'. In general Windows cannot 'see' Linux file-systems, but Linux can usualy 'see' windows ones. If you separate the systems so that there are 2 or more machines then there is no problem.

    Getting 7 OSes to work on one machine will be difficult, unless you use plug-in trays with a separate drive for each OS.

    Harry.
     
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  13. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    Physical :hahaha :eek:
     
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  14. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Good luck! I think you're gona need it! :ohmy

    In 8 years of being in IT I have never seen a computer that ran 8 OS's.

    Three yes, Eight......... :ohmy :eek: :rolleyes: :blink
     
  15. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    The problem, as always, is money. The OSs themselves I've seen going as cheaply as £10 on ebay. Then I get into considering 3 or 4 systems and we're talking thousands, I'm not gonna have that sort of money for a LONG time :(
     
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  16. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    A lot of these OSes could be run on old machines that are being thrown out.

    And the drive trays I mentioned cost £10 each - add older drives and you still won't have to spend that sort of money.

    Harry.
     
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  17. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    So how about if I had a single OS on a removable drive, would that work or is that still gonna cause as many problems? :unsure
     
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  18. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Removable drives is what I was suggesting.

    I once managed 4 OSes on a system without removable drives, but I had to be *very* carefull of it - it was just too easy to bring the whole house of cards down.

    Harry.
     
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  19. bob667

    bob667 Nibble Poster

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    Oh I get ya, so what I'd do is say have 2K3 and XP on one system, maybe W2K on the client and then the rest on a series of removable drives right?? :hhhmmm
     
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  20. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    it can be difficult getting different systems on the same PC. I would recommend that you have them on physically seperate drives either internal or external will work. The beauty about external is that you can plug the OS you want in and get it to work as long as you motherboard supports booting from USB. External drives are pretty cheap these day (around £60+). The other alternative is to buy a couple of cheap PC's which you can pick up for about £140 from places like Ebuyer (Without the monitor) and put a couple of OS's on each and that way you can put a NOS on one and a client on another. Do a bit of reseach into having multiple OS's on the same PC as it is tricky. For Windows you install the earliest OS first. With Linux and Windows I think it's best to install Linux first then Windows.

    Also watch out for the CD's on Ebay for £10 if they are windows XP or 2003 they will be copies.
     
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