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NPS connection request policy

Discussion in 'Windows Server 2003 / 2008 / 2012 Exams' started by jwl, Apr 11, 2014.

  1. jwl

    jwl New Member

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    It says in the tech articles that "regular expression pattern matching syntax" can be used to identify ipv4 subnets in a connection request policy. I read the related article about regular expression pattern matching syntax but there were no solid examples. Other Google searches did nothing to clear my mind so here I am hoping someone will know the answer. Does anyone know if you can use 192.168.0. to identify the 192.168.0.0/24 subnet? Or would you simply put 192.168.0.0/24 in the connection request policy to identify the IPv4 subnet?

    Jamie
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2014
  2. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Regular Expressions or 'RegEx' are a part of computer science related to Finite State Machines (FSM) and Lexers.

    Regular expression - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Tech Stuff - Regular Expressions - A Gentle User Guide and Tutorial

    An ip range RegEx might look something like this :-

    ^192\.168\.0\.([1-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1([0-9][0-9])|2([0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))$

    Try it out here :-
    RegExr: Learn, Build, & Test RegEx
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2014
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  3. jwl

    jwl New Member

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    dmarsh - Thank you for the reply. I went back and looked at the tech article and I guess I was mistaken. The acceptable format is to use pattern matching syntax and I'm not sure where I got RegEx.
    Here is the tech article reference minus the link.
    dd197583(v=ws.10)
    I am having trouble understanding pattern matching syntax; they do not give examples.

    I can't find anywhere that gives me an example of how to set/specify a subnet when configuring a client IPv4 condition of a connection request policy. My practice test gives me 4 options; I have ruled 2 out and I'm left with:

    1. Set the Client IPv4 address condition to 192.168.0.0/24
    2. Set the Client IPv4 address condition to 192.168.0

    The practice test is trying to say option 2 is best but I can't find any technet articles to back up either answer.
     
  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    It is RegEx.

    192\.168\.1\..+

    Reads :-
    192 -> Match literal 192
    \. -> Match literal .
    168 -> Match literal 168
    \. -> Match literal .
    1 -> Match literal 1
    \. -> Match literal .
    .+ -> Matches any character one or more times

    Its similar to the pattern I used above, only I used a more specific pattern.

    ^192\.168\.0\.([1-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1([0-9][0-9])|2([0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))$

    ^ -> Match start of line
    192\.168\.0\. -> Match literal 192.168.0.
    [1-9]|[1-9][0-9] -> Match 1 through 9 or 1 through 9 followed by 0 through 9
    | or
    1([0-9][0-9])|2([0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]) -> Match 1 followed by 0 through 9 followed by 0 through 9 or
    2 followed by 0 through 4 followed by 0 through 9 or
    5 followed by 0 through 5
    $ -> Match end of line

    Mine basically does same except it checks for complete line match (^$)
    and it only allows 1-255 in last octet.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2014
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH

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