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Note taking study method

Discussion in 'A+' started by greenbrucelee, Aug 6, 2007.

  1. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Have just finished reading through All in exam guide by Mike Meyers and Trips book and have now started to go through chapters and make notes.

    Have any of you studied this way?

    and if so how many pages of notes did you have when you were finished?

    I think I will end up with loads, I already have 8 a4 using both sides and thats just up to the RAM chapter in Mike Meyers book I havent started using Trips to take notes yet.
     
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  2. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    i study this way, it helps me remember stuff and helps me work out what i don't understand because if i can't write it down i don't fully understand it. also helps to reduce down the material to learn because i usually don't note down what i already know.

    grim
     
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  3. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I dont like taking to much notes as eventually I feel like I am lost when time comes to reflect on the notes that I've made. What I do though is just right down the key points when I read the book the first time and then reflect on those notes at the end of each chapter.
     
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  4. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

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    I tried taking notes, and realised that I was making too many notes on things that I didnt need too, if you've used 8 sides already maybe your similar to me!

    Making very precise bullet points worked for me in the end, If I was unsure on something I had wrote, I just referred back to the book, or a little thing called Google :)

    You'll find something that works best for you sooner or later :) Good luck with the A+ mate!
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
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  5. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I was thinking about revising my method as most of the notes I have are things I dont think I need like all the cpu types and wattage etc

    Bullet points sounds good tho
     
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  6. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    I just try storing it in my head, if it doesn't go in after a couple of attempts i'm buggered ! Fortunately this tends to happen less with things i'm interested in....:biggrin

    Sometimes I might try to get someone elses notes off a blog for an exam, but generally I just use the study guides...
     
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  7. Arroryn
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    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    I think you might want to take your own (and Nxplosi's) advice and revise the way you're... err... revising! Are you writing things in short form, or are you lifting entire sentences and basically rewriting them on a piece of paper?

    I use flashcards - buy a pack of blank postcards from your post office, and write small flashes of information on them.

    For example, IRQ and I/O settings - I would write the number on one side, and its designation on the other. Then I'd 'shuffle the pack' and remember things that way.

    A lot of the information for the A+ can be listed in this fashion and learnt - CPU speeds, Windows software requirements, and so forth.

    As for the rest of it, bullet points are a sure fire way of doing things. Alternatively, you can construct mind maps around ideas, as they're good ways of remembering how topics are connected to each other.

    It also depends on how your brain works. How have you learnt things previously? How do you normally retain info?

    I'll give you another example :D

    I have what I consider to be close to a photographic memory, so when I write notes, I use a lot of colour. I did this when I was learning verb declensions in Latin. I'd colour a certain declension and gender in a certain colour, and this would accelerate my remembering of the string in an exam - I'd thing of the colour, and basically see the text in my mind.

    So writing everything like you're a pen factory that's just sneezed on a sheet of A4 could work wonders if you've got that kind of brain!

    If you're more methodical (read, remember) then stick to bullet points and bullet points only.

    Anything left?... err... ah, yes. Good luck :)
     
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  8. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    I agree. It is easier to remember small amounts of *key* information.

    Boyce
     
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  9. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    mmmm flash cards I may try that.

    When I was at uni I did reading then taking notes method but I cant do that now mebby an age thing.
     
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  10. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    If you are at all visually oriented, try using mind maps. FreeMind is a free mindmapping application and can be found here:

    http://freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

    I agree that you can end up with enough notes to write your own book. The idea is to create a study tool that helps you remember the main points and concepts. When I was studying DOS memory management, I got large pieces of butcher paper and a marker and drew huge diagrams. I ended up studying for the CCNA the same way.

    That said, we all learn differently so use the method that works for you.
     
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  11. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I am not being funny but people say I know my stuff when it comes to solve problems on computers or giving people easy to understand info

    The problem is that sometime it just takes ages for me to remember how to do something even if its really really simple.

    for example today someone at work wanted me to find a picture on the departments comp, 3 times I went to my recent documents untill I remember my pictures :oops:
     
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  12. Beerbaron

    Beerbaron Megabyte Poster

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    i write bullet points, highlight text i need to remember and google anything i dont understand. theres no need to write paragraphs of text as it makes it more difficult to remember.
     
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  13. Fanatical

    Fanatical Byte Poster

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    I'd say your notes should be very, very simplifies version of what you read or for best use simple points that you can committ easily to memory. I found that if you print off the Comptia Objective you can use these as a "base" to scribble notes on. That way you can see that your following the objectives AND it's your study guide.

    I'd still sggest that you have a book of notes for things like lists and tables which you can read over and over a try to get stuck in your memory....
     
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  14. shaggy

    shaggy Byte Poster

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    haha, my notes are a joke, i find myself re-writting whole sentances, but i guess if ive written it, ill remember it

    ive taken notes up to chapter 17 and have done about 100 sides of A4
     
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  15. Mitzs
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    Mitzs Ducktape Goddess

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    I don't know about the rest of you but I highlight my book. When I'm done reading I go back though and write my highlights down with the page number beside it. I look these over every night this way I still have chapter one fresh in my mind at chapter 8. I don't write the whole sentance down just enough information for it to make sense. Why put more work on yourself. Green, are you applying the information you learn into hands on as often as you can? I found this with taking notes works best for me. Actually seeing what the written words mean by applying those actions really makes one remember, specially if you run into errors. You fig out why it responded that way and what you had to do to fix it. Anyway this worked best for me. But then I'm a very visually person. I need to touch it if I want it to really sink in.
     
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  16. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

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    :ohmy
     
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  17. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Yes I have been doing hands on stuff from the chapters were the examples in the A+ all in guide, like when it explains about maintaining and troubleshooting windows

    I even set my internet connection today as wireless using WPA but I dont think my wireless aerial is very good as my connection speed was up and down and all over the place.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?

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