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Losing hope.

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by John121, Apr 8, 2014.

  1. John121

    John121 New Member

    Hi everyone,

    I am new to this forum so hopefully it will benefit me. I am an IT graduate looking for a entry level job in IT for over 7 months and I am currently working part time at primark and doing a voluntary position as IT Support at Citizen Advice Bureau (joined last month).

    I am losing hope in finding a job as I feel I am getting nowhere. I need help
  2. Apexes

    Apexes Gigabyte Poster

    Hi John,

    Understand your frustration. Experience tends to prevail over coming straight from uni at the moment.

    However! don't lose hope. you're obviously moving in the right direction with the voluntary support which is always a help.

    Where are abouts are you located, and what sort of jobs have you been looking to go into? The key will be to find the entry level roles, the typical basic deskside support, helpdesk, frontline etc. There tend to be quite a fair amount of these roles from taking a quick glance on the job sites. (South west anyway!)

    Whilst the first job you get won't necessarily be the one you want or like, you'll be getting tremendous experience to systems on a live production environment, which counts for tons on the CV.

    I interviewed a few people earlier this year for a level 1 helpdesk role, 1 of the guys was straight out of uni, similar to you, with no experience. He could however, answer every technical question i threw at him - which was a plus in my book, so i took a gamble and brought him in - since then he's taken some time to get used to an enterprise environment, but he's spot on - he's spent extra time working and putting in the hours, and even helping out with some out of hours stuff. a year down the line he's progressing well enough that he'll probably go onto a 2nd line role, and then a few more years after that? who knows, probably even bigger and better.

    It's a long, hard, and time consuming process - but if IT really is your game and you're passionate about it you'll succeed

    Good luck, and keep at it :)
    Certifications: 70-243 MCTS: ConfigMgr 2012 | MCSE: Private Cloud
    K3T likes this.
  3. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    Basic IT knowledge is not going to guarantee you a job, you are going to have to excel and have in-depth advanced knowledge if you want to make a career out of it.

    A lot of IT is getting offshored these days to eastern europe, so you have to fight that bit harder to get a break. Having said that I just returned from a country with very high pay levels, and they had a lot of sub-par support people, including some english ex-pats. They could barely run batch files or follow simple install guides. They would run scripts on the wrong servers etc.

    I would keep doing personal projects to learn new stuff. There are many new areas where there aren't many experts, if you are smart you stand as good a chance as any. Areas like DevOps, Cloud, Mobile Dev, etc.

    I would also look at relocating to find work, companies tend to congregate around major transport links like airports or motorways and also around sources of other required resources like staff, so major cities typically.

    The job market in the UK is starting to look up, it may be a blip because there is a coming election, but it still means its a good time to get your CV out there.

    I'm a programmer and there is always demand for good programmers, just many jobs are for relatively lower pay at the moment, but for graduates the pay effect should be minimal.
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  4. John121

    John121 New Member

    Thanks for the advice. Regarding my current volunteering position I support less than 20 users, they have very old computers which is 10 years old as they receive limited funding. So do you think this experience can still benefit me?
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
  5. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  6. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy Kilobyte Poster

    don't give up! it can be a long hard struggle, took me over 2 years, hundreds of job applications, and countless interviews, but got there in the end! and if you continue to work hard you will go far :D
    Certifications: VCP,MCSA, MCP, MCDST, MCITP, MCTS, A+, N+
  7. aushus

    aushus Byte Poster

    keep at it you will get there, be paitance doesn't matter how long it takes you will get your dream role.

    I went through what you went through volunteering etc and I finally got a dream job :)
  8. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

    Never lose hope mate, this is all just a test of your character. If you keep trying you will succeed, and when you do, you will appreciate the opportunity given to you and give 110 percent. That is what I did. When I was 18 I got a place at Liverpool Uni to study Biochemistry but something didn't feel right, I loved computers but didn't know how to get into IT so I did bar work and data entry before getting my lucky break. It will happen, if you're enthusiastic and really want it. Good luck
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  9. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

    Its all luck mate hopefully some will come your way. Im hoping to study IT at college but unsure of its worth but I need some kinda skill and I do enjoy computers, but hearing a graduate cant even get a job is off putting. I wish you all the best, you're in a good position having a degree in the subject.

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