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Looking People who build PC's from scratch at home or work

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Mr Marmory, Apr 29, 2010.

  1. Mr Marmory

    Mr Marmory Bit Poster

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    Hi

    Firstly I don't know if we are allowed to post such things in this section of the forum.

    I am looking to expand my experience and update my knowledge. I need a top specification barbone PC with Motherboard and processor installed. If you build PC's in your spare time or at work, where do buy such things?
     
  2. gosh1976

    gosh1976 Kilobyte Poster

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    have a look at this thread. http://www.certforums.co.uk/forums/thread2572.html

    I'm in the Us and I've bought stuff from www.tigerdirect.com and www.newegg.com I think they will both ship international but I would think the charges make it so it's not economical. Might be worth checking them out though. I also have a couple pretty good little independent shops near me that I've used. I've also found some pretty good deals at some of the "big box retailers" for things like memory. You just have to shop around!
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2010
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  3. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Hi,

    I buy my gear from all sorts of places (including ebay).

    I would have a look at the likes of :-

    Scan
    Overclockers
    Tekheads
    Ebuyer

    My one bit of advice would be to ensure you know exactly what you want because it's a pain getting equipment that's not compatible.
     
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  4. Mr Marmory

    Mr Marmory Bit Poster

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    Thanks SimonD that is exactly what I was worried about i can't afford to make mistakes. I just need a top specification Intel Core i7 920.

    I was worried too much about compatability issues. I myself can only install hard disk, memory,floppy disk drive, and dvd drive. I have never installed a processor, heatsink, PSU, motherboard, bios or usb sockets.

    I really need someone like you with your experience.
     
  5. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    My advice would be not to try learning to build a pc on the latest cutting edge technology, if you get it wrong it can get expensive.

    However if you are going to build your own pc then here are some of the things to remember.

    Get a decent well ventilated case, the i7 processors run warm, infact warmer than the older core2duo's. If you have poor ventilation and not enough air flow you can soon cause all sorts of problems due to over heating.

    Make sure that when you install the motherboard that you don't over tighted the screws holding it to the case, if you do you can crack the board (even just a minute crack can cause you issues).

    Never use the OEM heat sink and fans from Intel, always try and get one that has decent air flow (look for a decent cfm rating on the fan) as well as quiet sounding fans (the lower db rating the better).

    Always get a decent TIM (Thermal Interface Material), the better the TIM the better the contact between the HSF and CPU will be. Also make sure that you look at the correct way to apply the TIM.

    Make sure you have the fans on the case set up correctly, you want decent air flow and that means having intake and exhaust fans, you don't want to have negative pressure in the case because that would be no heat leaving the case.

    Make sure you get the right type of Ram, there are currently two main types of ram used in home PCs, DDR2 and DDR3, they are not interchangeable. Also make sure that when you plug in and power up the new computer that your ram is running at the right voltage.

    Make sure you get a psu that will be capable of running all of your devices, if you are going to be getting lots of disks, a couple of video cards, loads of USB devices you will have issues running everything with a 400w psu.

    Make sure that you don't make too many changes at once, build up the pc, connect only a single drive (and cd) and start slowly, you may even want to run memory checkers before building up the box (just to make sure that the ram is running right, I would always suggest a good 12 hours of no errors before carrying on).
    Have a look at memtest86, it boots from a floppy or cd.

    Any more questions please don't hesitate to ask.
     
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  6. Josiahb

    Josiahb Gigabyte Poster

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    Just to add to this point, remember that wattage isn't everything, get a good qulity branded PSU if you want your shiny new kit to run right and stay that way.

    If your looking for barebones kits to take some of the difficulty out of the build process as a first timer look at Novatech or Overclockers UK both sell good quality barebones kits.
     
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  7. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    What they said.

    Also remember that if you are buying a barebones unless you specify, the company will most likely use a crap psu brand. As said wattage isn't the main concern when buying a psu it's amperage.

    THe best power supplies are:- Seasonic, Corsair (seasonic make corsair),THermaltake (tough power series only), OCz extreme, CWT and PC power and cooling.

    Make sure your psu has atleast an 80+ efficiency rate DO NOT BUY A PSU MADE BY WINPOWER, ROSEWILL or HUNTKEY I wouldn't trust any of those to stop my books falling of the shelf never mind power a pc.

    I also use novatech and overclockers for my builds.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2010
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  8. Josiahb

    Josiahb Gigabyte Poster

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    I actually used an old Jeantech PSU as a bookend for a while.... I say old, fecking thing failed within about ten minutes of the warranty expiring.
     
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  9. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    That's what usually happens with the cheap PSUs. YOur lucky it didn't take anything with it when it failed.

    I just dealt with a guy who I built a system for but he said he had his own psu to put in there. It was a Huntkey and 800 watts or so it claimed his pc needed a max of 700w. He started running crysis on full whack, the pc shut down and huntkey exploded. It's no wonder huntkey have been trying to bribe hardware reviewers with free advertising with their products.

    Unfortunately I told the customer there was nothing I could do, it was his choice to put the psu in the system. Luckily his ram still works but nothing else does :D
     
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  10. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    Thought the rest of your advice was very good mate, but there is absoultely nothing wrong with the HSF's that come with the retail boxed processers if you are going to run the chip at it's stock speed. Sure, an afermarket HSF will in most cases be better and run the chip cooler but the one that is provided is fine for most purposes. Obviously not for overlocking though. :)

    Also I believe that retail boxed processors have something like a 3 year warranty, as opposed to OEM's that only have 12 months.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2010
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  11. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Agreed. If no overclocking is involved the normla HSF will be fine. And yep they retails do have a 3 year warranty.
     
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  12. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    ....provided you arent overclocking, I believe.
     
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  13. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Hmmm.. given that P = VxI (according to Ohms law)

    and P is Power, measured in Watts.
    V is Volts
    I is Current, measured in Amps.

    Note, the input and output voltages of the PSU are constant (or should be)

    So the Power (Watts) is *directly proportional* to the current (your terminology.. amperage).

    So the power dissipation capability of the PSU, measured in Watts, is VERY important.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2010
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  14. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Yep maybe I should have been a bit more clear on that. I was meaning that you can get some power supplies which state 700w for example but have low amps whilst you can some power supplies which are 700w and have high amps.

    But yes I see what your saying.
     
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