1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Little help (course related)

Discussion in 'General Microsoft Certifications' started by mickaveli2001, Jul 30, 2008.

  1. mickaveli2001

    mickaveli2001 Byte Poster

    179
    2
    25
    What forum/section on here would be best suited for viewing information on the following:

    Microsoft SQL Server 2005
    Biz Talk
    .Net framework
    ASP.NET

    ^^^

    Basically software courses is what I'll be hoping to participate in later in life, and seen a forum with MCSE but again, this seems to be hardware rather than software, which is what I want to steer away from once I get the ground qualification of A+
     
    Certifications: NC Communication/Computing
    WIP: A+
  2. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

    4,140
    58
    214
    I guess that would come under software although you could read and download it from MS website Click Here If your still not sure what the software does then Wikki explains it quite well. CLICK HERE


    Again I would of though the software section, although you could try the search option on Certforums.:blink

    Not sure about SQL server it seems to ring a bell with ODBC components used in data sources under the control panel:hhhmmm maybe someone else can shed some more light on this subject:blink



    Biz.talk??:blink is that similiar to RAS?
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  3. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

    4,140
    58
    214
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  4. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

    1,219
    58
    116
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  5. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

    1,219
    58
    116
    Oh, just a quick point, A+ will help you very little when it comes to programing, so if thats what you want to do why not skip A+ and get learning programming skills.

    There is always the IT department to fix your PC ;)
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  6. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    Nope its microsofts ESB/Workflow/BPM/Webservices Orchestration/EIS thingy.

    I would not reccomend a beginner to look into it, learn to walk before you try to run !

    There are quite well defined cert tracks and materials for the other topics you mentioned, however maybe hold off on certification until you at least know what they are and have used them a little !

    Nothing wrong with doing the A+ just pick up some coding books and hit them at the same time...

    To me this is a common misconception, the development department ideally has some autonomy and sometimes runs its own hardware and networks. Its normally a mistake to treat an R&D or development department like the rest of the company in terms of IT provision.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  7. mickaveli2001

    mickaveli2001 Byte Poster

    179
    2
    25
    I want the A+ initially so that I can use this as a generic qualification to branch out to different ones if I find the software side of things more difficult than expected, good info though. Is a+ worth going for or diving right in to programming
     
    Certifications: NC Communication/Computing
    WIP: A+
  8. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    The A+ isn't really required, but in general for a programmer the more you know the better, a general appreciation of hardware and operating systems is required for most programming jobs. Knowledge of specific bus speeds and socket types etc is probably less useful unless you are a PC tech.

    Its upto you, if you can get the A+ knocked on the head quickly and then move onto programming.

    Well I think this is probably the wrong way to think about it if you want to be a programmer.

    "How do you eat an elephant ? one bite at a time..."

    First you have to be committed, then the rest will follow.

    or as Yoda would say

    "Do, or do not. There is no try."
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  9. mickaveli2001

    mickaveli2001 Byte Poster

    179
    2
    25
    Yeh, this is what I intend to have - appreciation, and a little knowledge of a computer overall, before switching over to programming (which I see as more advanced and difficult - IMO though) and I would like to get into it to see if I did like it or not. I have a HTML book, and would probably read a little through this after completing the A+

    & if - worst case scenario - I wasn't very good at programming, and just didn't like it at all after learning, then at least I'd have the A+ to fall back on, and to then branch out onto project A+ or network +

    In the end - I'd liek to be in the software side though, if of course I'm competent enough and fully able to do so
     
    Certifications: NC Communication/Computing
    WIP: A+
  10. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    Don't forget that HTML isn't a programming language - it is a markup language - there is quite a difference.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  11. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

    19,136
    462
    374
    Few techs truly escape the hardware side, dude. If you think hardware diagnosis is relegated to just entry-level techs, I've got unfortunate news for you: most of us continue to work with hardware throughout our IT careers... not just in PCs, but in servers, firewalls, routers, switches, you name it.

    Now, if you plan on being a programmer, that's a different story... but why tackle the A+ if that is your goal? Being a hardware tech isn't going to help you in programming much. If being a programmer is your goal, learn to program, and bang out some code to show employers what you can do. Then get an entry-level programming job.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

Share This Page

Loading...