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Linux+ and Network+?

Discussion in 'Linux+' started by Malnomates, Sep 13, 2006.

  1. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    I'm currently studying for Network+,which incorporates some basic understanding of Linux (amongst others).I'm considering taking a Linux+ course alongside Network+ to give myself some grounding in other OS's administrative heirarchy in terms of network support and experience with systems outside of Microsoft. I'm undecided on this one,as Network+ is taking what little free time I have to spare and perhaps taking the Linux+ course AFTER I've completed N+ might be a better option?

    I do have the option of installing and getting first hand experience of Linux (probably SUSE),what do you think?
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  2. GmanUK

    GmanUK Byte Poster

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    Hi Malnomates

    Hmmm...if you can do both Linux+ & Network+ side by side and take them together you are a better man than I am!! Honestly, I would concentrate on N+ then consider your next one!

    It took me a 2 1/2 months to revise and pass the N+ and thinking back, if I had to include study for the Linux+ exam I think I would have gone brain dead! This is coming from a guy who has spent many a happy hour setting up Linux servers!! Its not so much of the hardness of the exam but all the cold hard data that you need to understand!

    Whatever your decision, good luck :thumbleft
     
    Certifications: CompTIA N+, Server+, CCSN, ITILv3 (f)
    WIP: MCITP Security
  3. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    Thanks for the advice gman.I'll stick with N+ then look at the options for expanding into other operating systems later on.N1 fella..8)
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  4. GmanUK

    GmanUK Byte Poster

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    I think thats the right thing to do.

    The good thing about the N+ sylabus is that it gives the reviser the option of reading further into the subjet if wanted. I learnt alot from reading something in the N+ coursework then digging a bit deeper somewhere else...you will be surprised. :biggrin
     
    Certifications: CompTIA N+, Server+, CCSN, ITILv3 (f)
    WIP: MCITP Security
  5. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    You will probably want to take one exam at a time. Both are challenging and your brain would probably explode if you studied for both back to back. I'd recommend learning Linux using either Debian or Fedora Core. They are both "old school" Linux. Since Novell bought SUSE, there have been some changes on how the file system is organized that probably won't map to the Linux+ exam.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  6. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    lol,an exploding brain sounds a tad uncomfortable to me,I'll be looking outwards from my N+ studying and gathering 'extra' information as I need it,thank you gman-words of wisdom there..

    Sound advice too Tripwire,looks like I've just talked myself into another cert..:eek: ....8)
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I'd ask what it is that you are looking for in a Linux certification, and ask if you already have some Linux experience. I'm not asking if you have on-the-job Linux experience, but if you've even used it yet.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  8. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    I have limited (very limited) hands on experience with SUSE,as some of my clients are tight gits and set up their networks with Linux.This only entails adding printer drivers and a little on the networking side of things,like adding the DNS details etc etc.

    I'm kind of looking outside of the square with Linux certification really,since it is slowly but surely becoming more popular in the workplace (even then it has a tiny population) and I'm starting to see it in a 'live' scenario more often,I think Linux+ would be a good choice,or maybe not!

    There is the option of the 'Teach yourself Linux' on the official website,anyone used that?
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  9. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I wouldn't look to Linux+ to teach you very much. It's a mile wide and an inch deep. It's so basic that I think someone could pass it without ever having used Linux. It would be of very little help in teaching you how to administer a Linux machine.

    The LPI certification will make sure that you know a lot more about Linux before you can pass it so it's a much better cert. I think it's much better known in Europe than any Comptia cert is too, at least that's what I remember d-Faktor as saying. This is the cert upon which Ubuntu is building their distro-specific cert.

    Also, if I were you, I would have a machine at home to work with and install a couple of different distro's on it. I'd install one distro each from the RedHat and Debian families on it. That way you cover the two main package handling systems being used and that are included in the LPI cert. If you learn them you'll have no problem whatsoever with SuSe.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  10. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I just couldn't let this go without commenting on it.

    A businessman that installs a network that has no problems with spyware, viruses, or malware, has greatly increased network security as a result, is not locked into any proprietary document formats for the future, has no expenditures for software unless the company has some specific, custom-built software needs, and accomplishes all this for less money than if he had used MS products is a "cheap git"?

    The company not only cuts initial systems costs and removes application costs, it cuts the costs of running the network after it's built because they don't have the constant costs and headaches of maintaining all the problems associated with a MS network such as security and keeping track of licensing issues. Sounds to me as if whoever it is, is making pretty intelligent business decisions.... They have gotten past the hype being fed to them every day through advertising and are thinking for themselves.

    As you say, there are more and more businesses moving this way because the owners/management are starting to see the real advantages of open source.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  11. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    In my last job, we were in constant contact with the Police who used Novell.

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  12. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Were they actually running the Linux clients or were they running a Novell network with MS clients? It can be done both ways.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  13. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    As i understand it SUSE is based on Novell?

    'Cheap git' is'nt a pop at Linux,or its implementation through knowledgable research and resource management,just an uneducated remark from yours truly!Now that you've put into perspective a reason and valid business structured decision to employ Linux,in whatever shape,form or distribution it resides,I have a degree of respect for that particular client.He is still a git though..:biggrin
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+
  14. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Freddie,

    I couldn't say for sure because i was only going by the headers in the e-mails from their own Server. I would guess Windows clients.

    Si.
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  15. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    SuSe, is a Linux distro which had it's rights purchased by Novell. You can still get the original, open source distro. It's called Open SuSe now, and Novell's commercial release is called SuSe Linux Enterprise Desktop(SLED) along with a couple of other naming conventions for their servers that are built on SuSe.

    Novell has had its own server OS's, other than their new Linux ones, for many years and used to have their own proprietary network protocols. They now use TCP/IP so they will be compatible with other OS's. They also have several Windows client management tools and their own email servers.

    Novell was first with the concept of a domain structure long before MS came out with AD. MS basically copied Novell's domain structure for AD, and if you talk to old Novell techs who have experience with both they will tell you Novell has a superior product. I couldn't tell you one way or the other as I've never seen a working Novell domain. I have seen a feature list as compared to a MS AD domain and the Novell directory structure did have more features than MS's and they looked to be useful features too.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  16. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    LOL. I didn't even read it as a shot at Linux. I was just pointing out that whether or not this guy is a git(I don't know what that is, but it sounds bad. :twisted: ), it's not because he made a decsion to implement a Linux based network. I think a lot of small businesses will go this way, especially newer businesses as they don't have a migration to do. They can just start from scratch.

    Any grassroots movement starts out slowly and then begins to grow faster and faster, and that's what Linux is, a grassroots movement. Right now Linux is just starting up that accellerated growth slope, and I think it's going to just keep right on going. There are just too many financial and security advantages for it not to take hold. Businessmen are pretty much bottom line based in their thinking, and when they finally recognize the Linux advantages they are going to make the move.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  17. Malnomates

    Malnomates Megabyte Poster

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    You are an education Freddie!

    And,not before time,the Linux+ forum comes to life......:p
     
    Certifications: A+ Network+

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