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just an interesting question

Discussion in 'Networks' started by kobem, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    hey people i came back! :) with new hard questions:biggrin

    i want to learn this : for example think of a hotel network
    and i want to put some network devices in it . There are cisco
    switches and some other basic switches in the world.

    when i try to build a hotel network , do i have to use
    powerful switches such as cisco switches or basic switches ?

    .............

    Considering that you didn't get what i said above , i give
    a new example.

    when you have a home network and going to the internet
    you can use dsl routers (not a real router exactly , have many ports only but they are not as powerful as
    cisco 2600 , 3200 ones


    and in a hotel should i use cisco routers ?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  2. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    depends on how many uses, what functions you want and if its wired/wireless or both

    grim
     
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  3. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    [​IMG] :morebeer :popcorn

    Depends on how much data is flowing, and how important it is to keep your network running smoothly.
     
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  4. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    did you really get my question ?

    if so , can you explain me a bit clear?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  5. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Install a Netgear 834G then leave the building, no need for a broadband connection. :wink:
     
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  6. MacAllan

    MacAllan Byte Poster

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    The reason that you aren't getting cut-and-dried answers is that we don't have much to go on from your original question. After all, there are small family hotels with 4 rooms, and somewhat bigger ones with a thousand....

    Cisco routers are not that special (ducking the missiles...) - you will always be able to find ones by other manufacturers that are cheaper that do a similar job. With cisco, you are not so much paying for the router's capability, you are paying for its reliability, its capacity, and especially for the SUPPORT. Someone gave me a quick and ready reckoner idea once: if the router fails, how much money will you lose per hour thereafter: based on that, you can decide if you want to pay thousands for a cisco router and 4-hour guaranteed uptime support, or pay hundreds for a SOHO model that has 24 or 48 hour support, or less for just a spare to keep in a cupboard.

    If I ran a 4-room hotel, I guess I'd go for the cisco option..... :biggrin
     
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  7. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    More info is needed, much more! :biggrin

    I take it wireless is needed here? :blink
     
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  8. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    OK ! think that it is a university campus!

    will dsl 4 port routers be enough for this? or should i use
    a cisco router for internet connection in campus ?

    (note : i am talking on "WIRED" not "WIRELESS"
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  9. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    DSL routers *are* routers. But I fail to see why you need such items here.

    You just aren't giving enough info. How big is the campus? How many outlets are required? What bandwidth useage is expected? What is the total distance accross the campus?

    All these things are important to the final design.

    Harry.
     
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  10. newkoba

    newkoba Byte Poster

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    all you did was change the location. i am going to go with this answer because from what i understand you are asking if a basic 4 -16 port switch / router from, say linksys, would be enough. i would say for a 4 bedroom bed and breakfast type of place yes. for a normal sized hotel no i would go with professional level equipment, i would probably go with HP procurve items as i've grown to enjoy using them. plus with a normal sized hotel or even better a college campus, you will need far more than just a basic setup. if i go look at my rack right now we have probably 30-50 switches or better connecting our servers and our remote locations. at each of our remote locations they have their own switches that feed their local campus. please keep in mind that we've got a little over 100 servers in the NOC and about 300 total on the network all supporting roughly 21k computers.

    hope this helps some.
     
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  11. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    you nearly got me but not completely , man!

    you mentioned increasing the number of them in medium or large buildings BUT in a normal sized hotel should i use
    linksys switches or more stronger cisco switches?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  12. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    No. :blink

    This question cannot be answered, why? Because there is not enough info given to give an accurate answer or even a recommendation.

    Don’t think that big network = Cisco and small network = anything else, it’s not always the case.

    You need to plan things if you are going to undertake any network installation. First thing to do is to assess what the requirements are. This obviously varies depending if there is any IT infrastructure in place already. Most of the time there is therefore you need to audit what the setup is like and if any of hardware can be migrated fit in with your new proposal.

    Getting away from the hardware side of things the actual configuration of the network has to be assessed as well, this can be in regard to DNS,DHCP, free HD space on servers, firewall config etc.etc. This should also be put in the proposal if you need to reconfigure anything as the previous IT chap has made a few config errors.

    Gather all your info together and put in a proposal and then meet with the client again. This is when you get a ‘WTF!, how much is this gonna cost me?!?’ After a discussion contracts get signed and only then do you get to install the network, which is the fun bit.

    Hope this helps mate, its just what happens in a real network install so hopefully you can appreciate how much time and resources are needed to do the job properly. :biggrin
     
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  13. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Looks like you didn't really get my very basic answer. :)

    Worth the price of admission, every single time. :popcorn
     
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  14. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Kobem,

    Man, you need to have some basic understanding of what you're talking about before you start jumping into the middle of things. Like Zebulebu, I'm coming to the conclusion that you very well may be conducting some rather off-the-wall social experiment.

    If you are not, well, I really don't understand your insistence on jumping into exceedingly complex issues time after time for it is blindingly obvious have you no knowledge of the issues at stake whatsoever. If you really want to understand anything about what you're trying to do you need to educate yourself on these subjects. If you don't, the only thing at which you will succeed at in the end is in making yourself appear to be a fool. I say that, not to be cruel, but to help you understand that you need to study. These are not issues that anyone, and I mean anyone, no matter what their IQ, no matter how smart they are, can understand unless they first study the principles that these topics you are asking about are built on.

    IT isn't easy. It's very difficult, and only small portion of world has the ability to succeed in it. It takes a certain kind of individual, and a certain level of a certain type of intelligence. I'm not saying that you cannot be that person, only that so far you haven't shown it to be so.

    When I first considered entering this field I was so ignorant about all of it that I thought I actually knew something because I had installed software on my Windows 98 computer and re-installed the operating system a few times. Man, was I self-deluded. I was too ignorant to even understand how ignorant I was. It's taken me years to grasp the underlying fundamentals of things, and I still do not know many of these areas in-depth. Nobody can know all of it. There is simply too much for any one person to absorb, because these are not easy subjects to grasp at all levels. There are many levels of abstraction and these require great concentration and time to fully understand. It is no accident that there are few, if any, people who master programming, system administration, networking, web development, security, etc... all at the same time. The reason being, there is so much to know in any one of these fields that unless the person has an IQ of well over 200 they will never be able to master more than one field, and it will still take years of effort to master just one field.

    So, please give yourself a break. Start studying. Make Google your friend, and if you have the money, start buying books. Ask for recommendations on the books you need for the topics you are interested in. Ask what foundations of knowledge you need to get to where you want to go. You will never regret the decision. I know I haven't, and I can see no possible future in which I would ever regret learning.
     
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  15. juice142

    juice142 Megabyte Poster

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    There are times where I feel that i have to break my own rules.

    This is one of them and I...

    QFT.

    J.
     
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    WIP: 70-270, MCSA
  16. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Sometimes, the truth is so overwhelming, you have no choice but to quote it for emphasis. 8)
     
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  17. juice142

    juice142 Megabyte Poster

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    Damn, nearly did it again. :rolleyes:

    But once is enough, you know how addictive it is, and it spreads like wildfire.

    :biggrin

    J.
     
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  18. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    QFT, my friend... QFT. 8)
     
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