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IT Degrees.

Discussion in 'A+' started by Ravneet, Feb 17, 2006.

  1. Ravneet

    Ravneet New Member

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    hello again
    guys/gals i really dont know much about any of the Computer related degrees out there.. Im very weak in science and maths.i just want to do something that requires logical thinking and pretty much learning to fix things. idont know if that makes sense.sorry if i sound like i dont know what i am talking about, i really do want to make a wise decision i dont want to run into a wall and be sorry bc i dont know what im doing. Im trrying to balance my strenghts and weakness.. so help me out here.. if u can.. :rolleyes:
     
  2. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Well if you want to learn how to fix things like personal computers (PCs) I would recommend checking out the CompTia A+ section of this web site. It is an entry level certification, targeted at people that want theoretical knowledge to back up their PC repair skills.

    This site is primarily for those seeking certification in IT related subjects, ranging from the A+ to other certifications like desktop support certs, networking certs, web design certs and database certs etc. None of these are degrees, a degree is an academic qualification obtainable through university, that is very highly thought of but may not prepare you for the day to day cutting edge stuff that is on the shelves now.

    Ideally you should have an IT related degree and certs for your chosen specialisation but very few people in the UK possess both.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  3. Ravneet

    Ravneet New Member

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    lol :biggrin dont get me wrong i do know what a degree is...and i will be doing A+. Im just thinking about what to pursue in a university relating to IT.
     
  4. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Ah good, thank goodness for that :D

    I can't help much with current degree paths in the UK, I am a tad too far away these days but I am sure someone will be able to help you once the guys and gals have woken up!
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  5. daveo

    daveo Bit Poster

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    Hi ravneet

    You've probably already found the right course to do if you want to get into fixing things imho - the A+!

    About degrees, having finished a computer science one last year I can def advise you on what to avoid :D

    If you want to avoid maths (wise) then I wouldn't choose computer science as it's very much maths and theory based including soul-destroying things like discrete maths, algorithm analysis, data structures and function theory which altogether can make for a painfully long 3 years of study! When it does get practical it'll be mainly programming and not fixing. The level of theory in 'compsci' varies from uni to uni but I doubt that at any of them will there be any upgrading/fixing involved.

    The lack of bread and butter hands-on computer fixing from the degree left me with a big skills gap to fill and is what motivated me to start A+. Anyway...

    Computer systems engineering is a more practical degree but I think that involves mainly maths and physics too.

    Scour the UCAS and university/college websites, there are so many different I.T. degree courses out there with different slants on them you can almost definitely find something that interests you.

    Also, maybe have a look at HND courses they might be more geared towards what you want.

    Let us know how you get on ravneet, where you apply to and things...all the best with it :thumbleft
     
    WIP: A+
  6. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    Have you looked at the Open University?

    Unfortunately as the others have said computing at university level is highly theoretical and mainly based on maths.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  7. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    The hard truth about IT degress is that they are more geared towards developer careers. Not the traditional Techy subjects.

    Have you thought about a Foundation Degree? Thats what I'm on and it covers the following topics - A+, Server+, CCNA, 70-70, 70-290 and 70-291. In addition to other more 'traditional' subjects such as Web design, and 'Professional Skills'.

    When I'm done I have the option to 'top-up' to BA/BSc, but having looked at what the modules covered are I'm not so sure about what to do, because they do seem to be very 'focused' on areas that I'm not so keen on (maths!).

    Alternatively, have you thought about Business IT Degrees? From what I've seen of them at my Uni they are a lot less 'technical'.

    8)
     
  8. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    ummm i agree with the maths part.. i just finished at HND in Computer Science and i hated the maths parts but loved the programming (C++ and VB) i was actually quite good BUT im coming to the UK to do a degree in computer networking which has no maths and lots of cisco!

    This site has a great option to search for courses have a look and type key words that interest you!:

    CourseFinder
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  9. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Erm Zimbo, theres a hell of a lot of maths involved with the Cisco stuff, subneting, hex to binary, binary to decimal, etc. :eek:
     
  10. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    LOL umm try
    The Derivative, Applications of the Derivative,Integration
    Applications of Integration
    Transcendental Functions
    Methods of Integration
    Geometry, Curves and Polar Coordinates
    Sequences and series
    Vectors and Analytic Geometry
    Curves

    i know some people struggle but the hex to bin and bin to dec is easy for me and im not a maths person!! 8) while this stuff is pretty hectic!!
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  11. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I assume that was said with your tongue firmly in your cheek? :biggrin

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  12. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    LOL why you say that harry?
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  13. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Well - I regard binary/octal/decimal/hex conversion more as arithmetic than maths!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  14. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    yeah same here... and its has to be apprently for the cisco exams doesnt it? :blink
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  15. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Hi,

    If you are thinking about an IT related degree, unless the degrees in the US are very different than the degrees in the UK, I don't think you have to worry that much.

    I did my BSc in Computing and the only "real" maths that was in the whole course was the 2 semesters on Formal Specification on software systems where we had to use algrebratic expressions to design systems. So really it was just using the math symbols, as math symbols are universal. As for sciences, what are you worried about? Biology? Physics? As I recall, the only science that was on the course was Computing (some places have changed the Computing course from science to engineering).

    If you do want to do a IT degree, you can do a degree in computing and specialise in Internet, Computer Systems or Software Engineering or, as Simongrahamuk has already said, there's the other choice of a degree in Business Information Technology (BIT).

    I agree partly with JonnMX, degrees are alot theoretical and I haven't used any of the info since I entered IT (mainly because of the field I decide to enter), but it has improved my career.

    When/if you start your degree program, don't not think that you have to get the best grades or excel in every subject. In reality all you really have to do is get the minimum pass mark to get it.
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  16. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    sorry i forgot to mention it was an american system! :oops:
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  17. Ravneet

    Ravneet New Member

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    wow thanks for all the suggestions.. :D :D i will look into it all.
     
  18. Sandy

    Sandy Ex-Member

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    Hi Ravneet

    I am halfway through an Open University degree their B Eng but took that route as it gave me far more flexability that their BSc (Hons) in Computing or Computing and IT, there is a fair amount of maths in the higher level courses. A peek at my web site will give you the detail of what I am doing.

    The OU allows you to build a number of courses into a "named degree" where there is a menu courses that you must do or an "open degree" where you can pick what you want to do, e.g. Geology and Technology of Music, there are also a number of lower qualifications, e.g. Certificate in IT & Computing and Diploma in Computing, that will give you a taster and a qualification en route.

    If you set out on any degree you will have a huge amount of work to do - kiss good bye to a social life. Consider doing A+ Net+ and Windows/Linux quals before heading into six years of, very interesting, slog doing a part time degree.
     
  19. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Hmmmm.... I have to take exception to this advice, not that it's bad advice, but in the context that it is given in.

    If anyone thinks that the effort one needs to put forth in studying for certifications is somehow different than studying for a degree from an accredited educational institution they are sadly mistaken. It is impossible to gain certifications that will actually be meaningful in the business world unless diligent, self-disciplined effort is not put into earning them.

    In fact, imo, studying certifications take more effort than a regular degree if they are studied for properly. Why? Because you must not only understand the theoretical, as you would in from an accredited educational institution, you must also put in all the the hours of actually putting into practice what you are studying.

    Real certification study is equal combinations of hands-on work and theoretical study of concepts and ideas. And, it's all related directly to what you are studying. In an accredited educational institution they spend just about as much time teaching things are not directly related to your major. In fact, in my college time I spent just as much time in classes that were more political indoctrination than anything else.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  20. Sandy

    Sandy Ex-Member

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    Hi ffreeloader

    While everybody has their own view on my comment having got A+, N+ MCSE in Windows 2000(219, 221 & 224 electives), I work in UNIX and Linux, so I have done the cert bit and am in the process of doing the part time degree bit from my part of the planet I know what is eating more of my time. There is one slight difference between an IT cert and a degree in the UK. An IT cert has a pass/fail mark, and I am happy with that, a degree has a classification First, Upper second, Lower second and a Third. Fine if you just want to do the work you should get a Third but some of us are aiming much higher (one reason I am not about here to much these days :( )
     

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