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Interview Questions

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Nelix, Oct 23, 2004.

  1. Nelix
    Honorary Member

    Nelix Gigabyte Poster

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    Ok, as promised here are some of the questions asked at my recent Network Engineer interview.

    1. Describe how the DHCP lease is obtained?

    2. users report that they cant access the internet or the corporate network, in ipconfig there ip address is 169.254.*.*, what is wrong.?

    3. windows 2000 can be operated in one of two modes, what are they?

    4. Name 3 volume types found in Windows 2000 and describe what they are.

    5.What is DNS ?

    6. DNS has 5 posible zones, name them.

    7.Whats the difference between forward lookup and reverse lookup?

    8. What are the advantages of using NTFS over FAT ?

    9. As a corporation should we use IPSEC- based security or certificate based, whats the difference ?

    10. After installing a DHCP server (Windows 2000) users are not getting DHCP Leases from it, whats wrong ?

    11. Users report that they cannot access the internet via ISA Server, it has been working previously, what steps would you take to resolve the problem.


    I think thats all of them, got them all right bar 1, Lets see how everyone else does.
     
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  2. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    Good selection,
    depending on the role i have had them delve a little deeper into dns, and vpns/router switch stuff, but its all pretty bulk standard :)

    congrats on the new job, well done mate
     
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  3. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Hmm it's DORA isn't it.
    Can't for the life of me remember what the D stands for.
    O is the offer whereby the DHCP server offers the client an available address from it's scope.
    R is for Request, whereby the client requests the address from the server it has been offered.
    A is for Acknowledgment, whereby the server acknowledges the clients request.
    Hmm, what on earth does the first D stand for hmm.Oh well, that just shows me I need to learn that more, as I'm doing this all from the top of my head.
    Ahh, is it 'detect' maybe, don't think so though.

    Edit: Waheyyyy, as soon as I finsihed the post I remembered.It's 'discover' whereby the client discovers where the DHCP server is.It does this by quering the DNS server, and there has to be DNS server for DHCP to work, I'm pretty certain. :D
    That isn't a valid IP address.
    Windows 200 native mode, and mixed mode for compatiability with a network with legacy operating systems, ie NT4 present.
    Spanned volume: Enables you to create a single volume across multiple disks.It basically simulates a really big single ahrd disk, especially so if you span it across many disks.I think 32 disks is the maximum, and two the minimum, of course.
    Striped volume: Spreads a single volume across multiple disks, like a spanned volume does.However, the data is written to all disk simultaneously., thus significantly increasing read write performance.
    Again I think the maximum number of disks allowed is 32 and the minimum two, of course lol.
    Mirrored volume: Does what it says on the tin, mirrors the data on the volume over to another hard disk.Obviously you need two hard disks for this.If one hard disk goes down, the other can be used to keep the system going until the mirror can be reconfigured with a new hard disk.
    The domain name system.It's the system used throughout the internet to resolve host names to IP addresses.Windows 2000 includes it's own implementation of DNS.
    Primary, Secondary, Standard, AD integrated, hmm can't think of the other one.I haven't studied this very much, I'll be surprised if any of them are correct lol.
    A forward lookup zone is used to resolve host names to IP adresses.
    A reverse lookup zone is used to resolve IP addresses to host names.
    So they do the opposite to each other.
    -Integrated security features.
    - Supports much:!: larger disk space.In fact i think I read that NTFS can support a hard disk up to 2 exabytes (whatever the hell that it, sounds bloody scary though) in size.I may be wrong on on that, as I'm going purely from memory here.
    Other stuff as well, like just better features, its just better u know, jeez wadda u want me to say.
    Hmm, not done loads on this either.Probably Certificate based, ebcause it allows you to define security standards that must be adhered to, which a corporation needs.Something like that.
    A scope of addresses hasn't been applied to the DHCP server.DNS isn't on the network, so the clients can't find the DHCP servers IP address.Not sure, there's probably an obvious answer though.
    Had this problem at work today, in the last two hours.Nooo no internet.I just had to do some work, instead of browsing the net lol.
    Hmm but in an interview I would say, well check that the servers still working or summit.Sorry a bit clueless on that one.

    Thanks a lot Nelix, for taking the time to write those out.It's a great help, cheers mate.
     
  4. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

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    um flex, dhcp works fine without DNS
    you couldnt query DNS till you had an ip address anyway :)

    and the IP address is fine, its a reserved range for Automatic addressing, basically if a client cant contact a DHCP server and doesnt have a manual address, it falls back to that automatic range, if all machines on a subnet had those addresses, the network would work fine :)

    its just not good practice
     
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  5. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Hey I just read that an exabyte, is 1,024 petabytes, or 1 million:!: terabytes.
    [​IMG]

    They also say that 5 exabytes would store every word spoken by all human beings.
    Hmm, I think they must have left out the dizzy little girl in our office :x
     
  6. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Thanks for posting the questions, gives me a bit of insight!

    Firstly make sure you have connectivity to the ISA server from the clients ie (ping it), if you are using the firewall client software make sure that it is able to contact the ISA server. If connectivity is okay, then open the ISA Management Console and check that the web proxy and firewall services are started and make sure you have DNS resolution to the net from the ISA server itself. You could also make sure that nobody has changed the Protocol Rules, Site and Content Rules etc or played with routing or packet filters which could also prohibit surfing under certain circumstances. Oh and have you paid the ISP's bill lately?

    Because ISA can be set up in different ways, ie caching only, integrated and firewall mode and there are three different ways of clients accessing the ISA server ie as a Firewall Client, Web Proxy client and Secure NAT client or a combination of the three. I would say the question does not contain enough information to give an exact answer 8)

    But hey, what do I know?

    Pete
     
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  7. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Me reckons that the DHCP server needs to be authorised in Active Directory before it as allowed to issue leases. Also any scopes configured on the DHCP server need to be activated before they work. Or, the DHCP server is on a different subnet to the clients and a relay agent hasn't been deployed on the clients subnet. Or the clients are not set up to obtain an IP address automatically. Or someone has made a complete hash of installing the server and configuring the scopes and NIC properties :eek:

    Pete
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  8. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Just to be more precise, I would say that a Windows 2000 domain can be in mixed mode i.e if there are any NT4 domain controllers still present. Note that only DC's matter.

    Or Native Mode i.e all DCs are Windows 2000 and you can switch (no going back) to native mode, where you can start to make use of a few more features such as Universal Groups etc.

    Pete
     
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  9. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    Sorry to take this slightly OT, in what way is this girl dizzy? :D
     
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