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How Should I Spend My Spare Time

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Professor-Falken, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. Professor-Falken

    Professor-Falken Kilobyte Poster

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    How should I spend my spare time.When I am not looking for a job. I could practice fixing some broken PCs I have sitting around or I could begin studying my Network + course what do you think? What I had planned is to get experience fixing computers at whatever entry level job I got and then study my Network + course after work. But maybe it would be wiser to practice fixing some of my broken computers until I find a job so that I could be a little more ready and a little more confident when looking for a job and interviewing. What do you think?

    Professor Falken
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia Network +
  2. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Perhaps go for the Network+ and then the MCDST after?
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  3. UCHEEKYMONKEY
    Honorary Member

    UCHEEKYMONKEY R.I.P - gone but never forgotten. Gold Member

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    Depends what direction you want to go in mate?

    Personally I would take some time out, relax, kick back, have a few beers go on holiday. Somewhere that's not flooded:biggrin

    It's good to see your keen on IT but don't forget to squeeze in the R & R. Life's too short8)
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia N+
  4. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Prof, if you really intend to fix PC's in the role of an IT techie, for a living, you simply must get some 'serious' hands on practise. You have a lot of catching up to do, you will be up against some strong competition, people like me, that have lost count of how many computers they fixed years ago.

    Do your studying for the N+ at the same time :)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  5. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    If you want to get a break in IT then you *have* to put the time in. Try and add a few extra certs to your CV to give yourself every chance in landing that first job in IT. :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  6. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    You have spare time? :ohmy Teach me how to get some of that! :biggrin
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. delboy

    delboy Bit Poster

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    Im sure repairing home PC's is one thing and repairing corporate business machines is a slightly different beast.

    Most people who've got an interest in IT have build standard PC's and done replacement of parts etc. Like fitting network card or a hard drive. Once youve done a few of those it becomes second nature.

    If you can do this you can say youve got that experience, I dont see why you need to waste your spare time on carrying on repairing pc;s.

    Business machines are slightly differnet. With clever little flaps and levers that allow removal of most stuff without a screwdriver (unlike you standard home machine that news a screwdriver for most repairs etc.

    Unless you can get loads of experience in doing these types of machines, your in-expereince will show when presented with one of those types of machines.

    But it doesnt really matter. You know all the basic parts and you eventually figure out how to rip a business machine to pieces within minutes.

    So spend you times on the basic certs is the best way to spend your spare time imo
     
  8. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    The reason he needs to spend lots of hands on time delving into and repairing computers has little or nothing to do with how the cases are built.. it is all about learning how to diagnose hardware faults and issues. You simply can't learn it by reading a book.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  9. delboy

    delboy Bit Poster

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    so what type of hardware faults does he need to identify?

    Network card aint got any lights when a live cat5 is plugged in. hmmm I wonder what the problem could be?

    Hard drives making a whirring sound, or it keeps blue screening - wonder what the problem could be?

    PC's running slow despite fresh build with nothing on it - hmmm I wonder what the problem could be?

    Theres no power to the PC's. hmmm I wonder what the problem could be?

    Lets face it its not rocket science identifying hardware faults on a PC. In a corporate environment the majority of the time its a straight swap out with a spare or replacement.

    The point Im trying to make is when youve done a few repairs on home builds, youve done em all.

    Same with business machines, but you dont see many of those type of machines around in residential enviroment.
     
  10. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    I don’t think it’s as simple as you make out mate.

    Faulty network card, motherboard, Network card not seated correctly, the RJ45 port may be damaged. The port may not be patched in, the port in the switch may be playing up.

    BSOD? Could be anything at this stage. Hard drives generally make a whirring sound. The cheap ones can be quite loud.

    Again, surely this could be anything without further investigation\troubleshooting.

    PSU, Motherboard, cable issue, is the PC even plugged in? Was there a power surge last night and little do you know that all the PCs now have various hardware problems.

    In a perfect world (in a corporate environment) every PC would have identical hardware, software and OS. This is not always the case!

    You may have to support older 2k and even NT infrastructure while migrating to a 2003 environment. This can mean there is some *very* old hardware to support, BNC NIC anyone? Don’t think you can just plug a CPU in either, make sure you have changed the jumpers on the mobo first, no plug and play here!

    Also if you are supporting office based users that use MS office day in day out then sure, you may not have too many complex hardware issues as they just require a basic desktop than can perform these tasks. You will probably support a PC that can be opened up without even using a screwdriver and it will have a 3 year warranty so if the hardware is playing up then it can be repaired for free. But when the warranty expires it’s up to you to support the hardware and this isn’t always easy when trying to find a replacement component.

    However lets say you support users that have a CAD application installed and need a high spec PC to get the most out of it, you may have to start installing graphics cards, dual displays, add more RAM etc etc. as just swapping the PC isn’t an option as it costs big £££ for this type of workstation.

    As Professor-Falken has just finished his A+ then there is nothing wrong in trying to get some more hands on experience repairing PCs, perhaps also studying for another cert, while looking for an entry level IT job. 8)
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  11. delboy

    delboy Bit Poster

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    Yes but in his spare time how is he going to get his hands on business machines where he can play about on them and get that hands on experience of the corporate environment.

    Thats the point im trying to make. Most PC's he'll be repairing are residential box standard stuff, he aint gonna get that array of experience repeatedly repairing home pc's.

    So im just saying if he knows the basics on the home machines, there no point wasting time continuing to do it cos he can do better stuff in his precious spare time.

    He;ll only get that kinda experience in the corporate world. Ie no lights on the network card in a corporate world could be faulty port, not patched in properly in the communications room, dodgy switch - not forgetting the basics faulty card, not set in properly, dodgy cat cable etc.

    But in the home environment whats it gonna be? Theres less variables you need to check.
     
  12. Professor-Falken

    Professor-Falken Kilobyte Poster

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    Bluerinse thank you, That is good advice.When I am not interviewing. I will divide my time into fixing some broken PCs and studying for my Network + you and tripewire have been a great help to me, thanks again for all of your help.

    Professor Falken
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+
    WIP: Comptia Network +
  13. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    You're welcome Prof 8)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)

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