1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How reliable are

Discussion in 'Software' started by greenbrucelee, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    The automatic overclocking features in the Bios say from a manufacturer such as ASUS?

    If you have plenty of cooling then it should be ok right?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  2. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

    2,397
    99
    154
    I have used it before and it's ok. I presume you are referring to the feature were you pick a % to overclock by, up to 10%. I don't think it alters the vcore at all, so it's pretty safe, but it's not perfect. Depends on the chip if it will take the overclock and still be stable. My old X2 3800+ wouldn't take a 10% overclock and be stable. This was because it needed the ram settings tweaking to be overclocked properly. Manually I could overclock it much more that 10%, but it was unstable on the auto overclock.

    As for cooling, yes it's advisable to have decent cooling if you are going to do it. Again it depends on the chip, may of the recent Intel chips will overclock happily even with the stock cooler since there is so much headroom in them.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  3. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

    4,570
    68
    196
    I only used the auto overclocking once and it worked well for me, but the overclocking was very basic. I don't see any issues with using that feature provided you have reasonable cooling of your pc. Personally I prefer to manually tweak the settings because I can have certain components take less stress then others, etc.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  4. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    Thanks guys.

    I have read quite alot on mobos recently as I am going to build a new system. Some of the new Assus boards have a feature where you just select the overclock option for the cpu you are using and it overclocks the cpu the ram Fsb etc.

    I have read about QX6600 2.4GHz being over clocked to 3.0GHz by just using this feature.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  5. NightWalker

    NightWalker Gigabyte Poster

    1,172
    25
    92
    I think a manual overclock gives you better control, especially important with your voltages. You can overclock a Core 2 quite a way with the FSB, not touching the vcore voltage and not generate that much extra heat. The heat comes from increasing the vcore, which you need to if you go for a fairly big overclock. I agree with Modey on the cooling, you really need something a bit better than a stock cooler.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, MCP, MCSA:M 2003, ITIL v3 Foundation
  6. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    When I build my new system it'll have a zalman cooler at the moment my system has a stock cooler.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  7. NightWalker

    NightWalker Gigabyte Poster

    1,172
    25
    92
    Get yourself a copy of Everest Ultimate, lets you keep an eye on all the system temps, fan RPMs, voltages etc in a nice onscreen display. Knowledge is power!
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, MCP, MCSA:M 2003, ITIL v3 Foundation
  8. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    wll do, thanks for that.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?

Share This Page

Loading...