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How much of a paycut would you take?

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Jonathan, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. Jonathan

    Jonathan Nibble Poster

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    Just a general question, how much of paycut would you take in order to do a job that would give you better experience etc. I really want to get into Cisco, I come from a telecomms environment and have alot of experience on the PABX side but want to get my hands on those routers,switches and firewalls :p

    Most of the jobs i am looking at would require me to take between a £5000-£7000 paycut. The one plus thing is that am in process of selling my house and it should complete in about 2 weeks so I would be able to pay of those nasty credit cards :twisted:

    What would you do?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP BSCI
  2. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    Well, about 6 months ago I was in a manual labour job - I packed slabs and drove a forklift truck (and no guys, I'm not joking :rolleyes: ). I want a career - my worst decision was dropping out of school after A Levels.

    So when I got offered a job in the offices at the place I was doing manual labour, I took it, as eventually I'll be able to move into a career field I want (working on usurping my way into IT).

    I took a drop of £8,000. It hurts, but I know it'll be worth it.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
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  3. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    When I moved into IT, I took a paycut of nearly 30%.
    I recovered that and more within the first two years.

    You have to be realistic.
    Firstly, you're moving from a job where you have experience and a proven track record. Your salary will have built up over the years. You then move into a new industry where you have none of these assets. It's going to be less.

    Secondly, employers like to take people on with a low salary. That way they can see how you perform and reward you accordingly. If you work hard and prove yourself, you can make up the gap fairly quickly.

    Thirdly, it's a competative market. As an adult looking to move into a new career, you are competing with 18 year olds who don't have a mortgage and two kids who are willing to work for less.

    Remember, you're moving because YOU want to. That means you are at the mercy of the employer, they aren't headhunting you so they don't need to tempt you with huge salaries. That comes later.
    But it will come to you. It sounds corny when people say 'you have to move backwards to move forwards' and in fact, it doesn't make any logical sense. That seems to be the way of things though.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  4. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    It would be easier to give an answer if we knew what percentage that was of your current salary. If you are earning a fortune then a 5K cut wouldn't hurt too much but from your comment about paying off nasty credit cards I assume that is not the case. If you are already in debt and you have a family to support and you are buying a new more expensive house with a big mortgage, well I would think twice at this stage.

    At the end of the day we go to work to earn money to put a roof over our heads, feed ourselves and be able to enjoy our social life.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  5. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Some good advice here, thanks guys. :)
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  6. Rostros22

    Rostros22 Kilobyte Poster

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    An interesting thread as this is one of the major issues in my career at the moment.

    I have been in IT for around 7 years now starting off as a junior installation engineer and I was basically installing Windows and physically installing the machines.

    I have built on from that now and I am in an ICT support role. The one thing that I did when I moved into my current job that I now feel is a mistake is move out of an IT related company and into a ‘support service’ for a non IT related company.

    Yes I received a pay increase but as I now fully understand IT is not essential to the company’s profit making, therefore no development funds are available. I am just a service for the company. So now as I am looking to move on to further my career it is more than likely that I will have to take a lower paid job in order to get what I want, a job in an IT related company that will develop my skills, therefore helping the business.

    I agree that it is a tricky situation when leaving a career to start a career in a completely new field, but I just want to point out it isn’t all plain sailing in the IT business as many here have said! With or without experience.
     
    Certifications: ITIL Certs, F.A.S.T Auditor Certs
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  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    This thread is probes a question that I could never really make my mind up on for a long time. I was making good money, but wanted to learn to work in IT for a long time. However, I just couldn't see myself giving up the money I was making for a few years of school and then starting over in a new career.

    Sure wish I could have been smart enough to have done it voluntarily when I first wanted to learn this stuff. If I had I would not have gone through the toughest times of my life in the last few years. My back wouldn't have disintegrated to the point it did from all the heavy lifting, and even if it had gone out, I wouldn't have lost my ability to earn a living. I could have still kept working.

    The way things worked out I am now getting into IT in a really tough job market. I'm now significantly disabled, and I'm a good 15 years older. All of these make the transition much, much harder than it would have been if I had just made the decision years earlier.

    So, if anyone out there really has the desire, and you're just putting things off because you think the reduction in income will hurt, just remember that it's very possible that you could have the ability to choose taken away, and be forced by circumstances to make the change and then things will be much harder.

    Follow your dreams when you're young. Don't wait till your age and health are factors in making changes. Hard times are much easier to take with youth on your side.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  8. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I am really sorry to hear about your back Freddy.

    My back is a major cause of concern for me too. I am not disabled but I can't do any heavy lifting at all these days. If I so much as lift a carton of beer I can guarantee at least a week of pain as a result. My back was damaged at work too, lifting heavy colour televisions for years and then photocopiers up and down stairs.

    You young guys should take note and be VERY careful what you lift and how you lift. Once you have a back problem it will hamper your life for ever more. Take care of yourselves or you will live to regret it.

    Sorry I know this is off topic but it struck a nerve.

    :offtopic
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  9. Veteran's son

    Veteran's son Megabyte Poster

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    I think the only way I will get IT experience is by
    volunteering one day a week while working five days
    a week at my paying job. It would be alot of work
    but hopefully I will eventually acheive my goal of obtaining IT employment. :)


    Excellent post also Freddy! :)
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: N+
  10. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Thanks. It's just one of those things that happened because I had too much testosterone running as a young buck. I worked construction when I was just out of high school and I used to load the block wheelbarrows up with over 750 pounds of pumice blocks so I wouldn't have to make as many trips. When I was doing appliance repair I'd load side-by-side refrigerators, washing machines, dryers, ranges, etc... into back of pickups by myself. When I worked HVAC it wasn't unusual for me to put a 200 lb compressor on my shoulder and climb a ladder with it to get it up on the roof or tie a rope on one and pull it up hand over hand. I used to pack 30 gallon kegs full of beer out of bars by myself too.

    I'm just paying the price for my foolishness is all. When you abuse your back that way you're bound to pay the price when you get older.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  11. Jonathan

    Jonathan Nibble Poster

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    It would work out between a 16-22% paycut, but providing the house sale goes through I would owe no student loan :p or no credit cards :p There is a chance that I might have to transition into BT in the coming months so I might wait until that happens to see if it opens any avenues up.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: CCNP BSCI
  12. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    That is actually a really, really important message to everyone out there.
    The ability to choose is a luxury that a lot of people don't have, at least not in the sense we're talking about.

    I've seen it before, and to an extent it's happened to me.
    You look around at other opportunities and weigh up the risks involved. Then you think, nah, why should I take a pay cut and start again? What if I don't like the new job? I'm comfy here, I earn enough, I get on with everyone.

    Then you get made redundant, or you get a new boss who everyone hates. or your company moves offices and it takes you three times longer to get to work.

    All of a sudden your power has been taken away from you. You're now looking for a new job out of desperation and you could end up making a bad decision.

    I'm not saying we should take risks or hop jobs for no reason, but just remember: Nothing ever stays the same.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD

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