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How do you remember things

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by flex22, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    I'm curious as to how you guys remember things, specifically study material.

    So much relies on remembering procedures, steps to be taken regarding troubleshooting, steps in configuring all sorts of things from hardware to AD.
    Also remembering principles and how different topics interrelate.
    Do you find it just comes together over time, or do you employ specific practices.

    I'm interested to hear as many varied ideas as possible, so we can all maybe pick up some tips.

    Afterall, remembering goes side by side with understanding.

    EDIT : Mod note (J). Moved thread to Training and Development Forum.
     
  2. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Obviously no one remembers anything[​IMG]

    Either that or they cant remember your post flex, tee hee hee..

    Methinks as far as I'm concerned the old adage comes to mind, endless repetition of the absorbing of the particular fact is required. Once in the brain, it tends to stick - its just getting it there is the problem![​IMG]
     
  3. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Putting that fact into context is also vital.I mean you can repeat a fact over and over, but if you don't know what it's for, then it's not very useful.
    Give an example of something you want to remember but that you can't get in there.
    That's for Cartman or anyone else to give examples.
     
  4. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Thats easy mate, touched on the topic we did the other night actually.

    Wait for it....SUBNETTING.....:eek:

    Arrrgggh..
     
  5. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Ok, first thing I think is to recall everything you know currently about subnetting, without referring to your books.

    So anything that comes to mind, just type them on here.
    Just the simplest things, whatever, just note them on here what you already know.
     
  6. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    In my experience, the best way to remember what your learning is to get your hands dirty and do it for real. That for me truly is the best way, as you really get a buzz from putting into action what you're reading from the page.

    I can remember numerous situations where I put into practice something I'd studied that I'd found pretty tricky or daunting, and thinking "woah, thats much easier than I thought it was going to be" when applied to a real-life scenario.

    Just my 2€ as always :D
     
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  7. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Once something manages to penetrate that armadillo shell, I reckon its in there for life!!!:dry
     
  8. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Interesting.
    So it's like you become more aware of why your doing something.
    I find this myself also Jak.Personally I find a balance between reading and understanding what's required, and then putting that into practical effect to increase my understanding.
    So as to not merely carrying out the exercise without knowing why I'm doing it, and equally not just knowing the logic without seeing the effect.
    The two go hand in hand :beers2
    That's an interesting analogy Mr Cartman.

    It brings me to the point of how you manage to tie in new information to what you already know.

    I'm going to try and come up with some interesting analogies, or mnemonics for different areas of my studies.
    Maybe even with subnetting, I'm sure there's a way.

    While your studying, try and think of ways in which what your learning about is related to something which you already know.
    If you can tie those together, ie: what's already underneath the 'shell' to what's currently outside the 'shell' then you'll be able to have that new information safe and sound underneath the shell, thus making it easier to remember as you'll have immediate access to it.

    I'll be taking exam 70-210 quite soon, so am using this time to bring all the concepts together and making sure it's all in my memory.
    I'll have a think and then post some topics which I'm having a problem remembering, so I can get some feedback and ideas of various people.

    Also, (unless you know everything and remember everything there is to know already)(or you just can't be bothered, and therefore can suffer in silence) I'd like others to post any areas which they find difficult to remember.

    The first things that come to mind which I find somewhat awkward to remember, are the various switches used throughout the operating of a system.
    Also, the differences between some of the security protocols.
    I'll have to nail these, and other's, which I aim to do, with your help.

    Thanks:!:
     
  9. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    I'd like to hear your theories about how to remember switches, they are not always logical and therefore have to adopt the 'you do this because you do' approach. Which I absolutely HATE!
     
  10. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Interesting thoughts guys.

    I generally find thatif you look at a concept long enough, there is a pattern, shortcut , mnemonic - whatever, that emerges (even if it only makes sense to you and no one else) to make it stick.

    Then it's simply a matter of applying it, whether in the exam, or in the real scenario.

    Erm, dunno quite how to take that. A compliment for now, I guess :rolleyes:







    This was the 3000th, for the record.
     
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  11. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Hee hee hee...I wouldnt bank on that Gav. You know me after all[​IMG]
     
  12. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    For me...two ways. Jak suggested the first which is to actually do the thing over and over. After all, that's what labs are for. Do the task you want to remember until you're blue in the face, sick of doing the task, and could do it in your sleep. You'll remember.

    For concepts that I'm having a tough time understanding and memorizing from text and notes, I draw pictures and diagrams. I'm hopelessly visual and if I can't "see" what you're describing...forget it. I got out and buy a cheep artist's sketchpad...a really big one. Then I "organize" the information in the way my brain is designed to understand it. Once I do that...it's alot easier.

    One last thing...there's just some stuff you have to memorize by rote. Things like "I before E except after C" or "30 days have September, April, June, and November...". Just suck it up and do it. Hopefully, you won't have to do much of this kind of memorization.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  13. flex22

    flex22 Gigabyte Poster

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    Excellent examples Trip.

    Those two examples do have a kind of rhythm to them which makes them easier to remember, so I wouldn't put them in the category of completely dry facts.

    I often try and make things rhyme, so that it can be made alive and moving somehow, you know.Give it some personality, relevance lol.
    Just thought I'd note the importance of rhythm in memorization.

    I agree with you Trip.Personally I use visualization a heck of a lot.Usually don't draw though, prefer to just see it in my head.Once it's firmly there, then I ahve access to it at any moment in time.

    Everybodies different, and what works for one person shouldn't be assumed to work for another.It's just great to see the variety of memorization techniques and try new things.

    I'd love to hear of any new or unusual memorization techniques that people employ.
     
  14. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    For what it's worth I do remember taking my NT4 exams (a while ago now) - remembering getting stuck on a couple of questions then fretting.

    What I did was stop, close my eyes and picture actually doing the task in my head and visualising the computer screen. Worked pretty well as a matter of fact.
    And amazed that my mind didnt digress to thinking about women (which it usually does!)

    Must have done something right - got 100% in the Server exam. Much good it did me, Bill Gates decided to invent W2K. You gotta luv 'im!
     

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