1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Help with DC (Active Directory) and DNS - Server 2003

Discussion in 'Windows Server 2003 / 2008 / 2012 Exams' started by SolidSponge, Mar 16, 2007.

  1. SolidSponge

    SolidSponge Bit Poster

    40
    0
    21
    Hi guys.

    I'm trying to set up a DC and DNS to use on my network. Problem I have is that I have a router that is acting as a DHCP server to assign IP's to all my clients. Now I know that DNS needs a static IP to function correctly so I need to disable the DHCP function in the router settings. My question is how do I know what IP addresses to assign to my server and clients (or just my server, because I'll eventually be setting up DHCP on there also)? I'm guessing that I'm limited to class C ip's as you can only change the last range of numbers of the Subnet Mask in the router.
    Sorry if I'm being stupid. I feel I should know this but I'm new to all this 290 stuff :biggrin
     
    Certifications: A+, MCP (70-270)
    WIP: 70-290
  2. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

    2,397
    99
    154
    You will only need to disable the DHCP server on your router when you want to setup DHCP on your 2K3 server. Just assign a static IP to your 2K3 server and then set it up as a DC / DNS server. It won't care that there is a DHCP server on the same subnet.

    The one thing you may have to do is tweak the scope that your router / dhcp server is using. That or reserve / exclude the address you intend to use for your DC.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  3. SolidSponge

    SolidSponge Bit Poster

    40
    0
    21
    Ah ok. So set my DC/DNS server to have a static IP, say 192.168.1.101 and take out that range in my router. I get it now.

    Am I right in saying that the IP's assinged by my router are class C only?
     
    Certifications: A+, MCP (70-270)
    WIP: 70-290
  4. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

    2,397
    99
    154
    Highly likely that they will be using a Class C Default subnet mask, yes (ie 255.255.255.0). I haven't seen a home router yet that didn't use a class C range / subnet mask.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  5. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,190
    296
    319
    Doesnt have to be a class C subnet but probably best to keep it that way for now.

    You dont have to exclude the IP of the DNS server in the DHCP scope either, when the DHCP server allocates an IP to a client it pings in first to check for a conflict 8)
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  6. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

    8,871
    167
    256
    Assuming that the box is up and running :rolleyes:

    Note that if you are setting up a domain, your clients TCP/IP settings should be pointing at your internal DNS server for local DNS name resolution - your router DHCP when leasing out IP addresses may not be configurable to do this and it certainly woo not be able to interact with AD.

    I would disable the DHCP feature on the router and set up a scope in DHCP on your server, especially as you are studying Microsoft and not D-Link or whatever vendor your router is.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  7. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,190
    296
    319
    It should be, looks like the DC is going the DHCP server as well. 8)

    Just to backup what Bluerinse has posted, always keep DHCP on the server when you can. The amount of the networks I have seen with a router handing out the I.P addresses is untrue.The problem is that it generally configures DNS to point at the router when it should be pointing at the DNS server and then using forwarders.
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  8. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

    3,748
    330
    187
    LOL - you haven't seen MY home network then...

    10.x.x.x all the way...
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  9. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

    8,871
    167
    256
    Mine too as it happens :)
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  10. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

    19,136
    462
    374
    And mine as well... though I'm using a 24-bit mask on it.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. SolidSponge

    SolidSponge Bit Poster

    40
    0
    21
    Cheers for all the help guys.

    I've just bought a cheap base unit to run server on (currently running it on my main PC on a 2nd partition and one XP client). Think I'm gonna set it all up on this when it arrives and I'll disable the DHCP on my router.
    No doubt I'll be asking for help again soon :blink
     
    Certifications: A+, MCP (70-270)
    WIP: 70-290
  12. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

    2,397
    99
    154
    I didn't say they couldn't use a 10.x.x.x range, perhaps I wasn't clear in what I meant. I meant that I have never seen one out of the box (ie default settings) that used anything other than a class C default subnet mask. Which of course would work just fine and dandy with a 10.x.x.x range anyway. Don't tell me you guys have more than 255 hosts on your home networks? :)

    I think people see 255.255.255.0 and assume that it must be a class c ip address range to go with it. Not at all ... :)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  13. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

    4,570
    68
    196
    Well its a mistake everyone makes the first time when they just learn how understand ip address, subnet masks, and how to destinguish the network ID, etc.
     
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA

Share This Page

Loading...