1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

fun engineering quiz

Discussion in 'Just for Laughs' started by Arroryn, Dec 31, 2007.

  1. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    Question:

    A bear falls from a height of 20 metres and reaches the ground in exactly 2 seconds.

    What's the colour of the bear?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  2. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    Got to be red, unless he landed in mud - then brown/red :lol:

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  3. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    lol. No.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  4. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

    2,874
    30
    151
    White?
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  5. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    Correct... now explain why :biggrin:blink
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  6. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

    5,763
    35
    174
    Would you actually be standing round long enough to see the colour of the bear. I know that I wouldn't be. :)
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  7. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

    2,874
    30
    151
    Its a polar bear...

    /runs
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  8. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    And, to quote a hair product advert... the science?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  9. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

    1,838
    33
    104
    Technically Polar bears aren't white! They have translucent hair which reflects the whiteness of the surrounding snow. And thier skin is a very pale pink not white before anyone says so!
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, N+, MS 70-271, 70-272
    WIP: Being a BILB,
  10. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

    2,874
    30
    151
    I actually guessed and have no idea! :biggrin
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  11. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    lol... fiiiiiine. Here's the science:

    Distance = ut+1/2at^2

    u = 0

    distance = 20

    t = 2

    therefore a = 10

    This acceleration (gravitational, as the bear is falling) can only be 10 at the poles (the average being 9.81, or 9.79 at the equator).
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  12. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

    6,623
    115
    224
    Er - I was wondering at the rather unusual implied value of g.

    According to Wikipedia it is about 9.832 at the poles. :biggrin

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  13. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    lol. Buggrit Harry, I'm trying to find a reference online that has the value of g at the poles as nearer 10.

    Both the engineers I work with say they have always seen it referenced closer to, if not slightly over, 10.

    So for the purpose of the joke/quiz, I have to say Wikipedia is lying :tongue
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  14. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

    5,763
    35
    174
    I had a feeling that was the case :D
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  15. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

    5,369
    85
    190
    Arroryn,

    Where was the fun?

    Cheeks (runs away before i get kicked in the nads!)
     
  16. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

    4,009
    186
    209
    Hey Cheeks,

    The words 'fun' and 'engineering', never mind 'fun' and 'quiz', are an oxymoron in themselves :tongue
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  17. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

    2,874
    30
    151

    How could you tell? :twisted:
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  18. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

    19,136
    462
    374
    Gravitational force is measured by g = G*M/d^2

    where G is the Gravitational constant, 6.67259 x 10^-11 Nm^2/kg^2,
    M is the mass of the Earth, 5.98 x 10^24 kg,
    and d is the distance from the center of the Earth.

    At sea level, d = 6.38 x 10^6 m (6380 km).
    Using this value of d gives a value of 9.8 m/s for g.

    At the poles, d = 6.357 x 10^6 m (6357 km).
    Using this value of d gives a value of 9.87 m/s for g... not 10 m/s.

    Sorry... the chemistry major/physics minor in me is comin' out. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  19. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

    1,011
    52
    105
    BosonMichael,

    Sea level? There's a sea level at the poles too. Didn't you mean "equator?" :) Also, I recall the units for g is m/s^2.

    The former Aerospace Engineering major is coming out in me. :)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
    WIP: CCDA
  20. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

    1,011
    52
    105
    Mr. Cheeks,

    This kind of problem is fun for engineers, therefore a "fun engineering quiz." :)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
    WIP: CCDA

Share This Page

Loading...