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Desktop technician without relevant background to an IT degree

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by sweetpea80, Sep 11, 2009.

  1. sweetpea80

    sweetpea80 New Member

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    Hi all

    I am just wondering, apart from the IT cerifications (CCNA, MSCE), is there a suitable degree a Desktop technican can progress to especially for someone who didn't have relevant qualifications to progress to the degree (I have an Biomedical certification) but would like to try?

    I have seen Computer Science degree is good for programmers

    Just curious. Thank you for your time! :D
     
  2. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    There is indeed a relevant certification from Microsoft for Desktop Support specialist, they're useful as an entry level exam if you do want to pursue an MCSE as they contain one of the prerequisites for getting an MCSE later on.

    For Windows XP, you can get the Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) certification by attempting exams 70-271 and 70-272. By passing one exam, you'll get the MCP certification, and by passing both you get the MCDST certification.

    You can also get a similar certification for Windows Vista and also for Windows 7. By passing the 2 or so certifications (for each), you'll first get an MCTS and then an MCITP certification. The Windows 7 certification also requires some sort of paid course (which has been detailed in another thread elsewhere on this forum).

    If you do the MCDST certification, you can attempt a single "upgrade" exam which counts as 2 exams and gives you the MCTS and MCITP exams all in one go. It is a pretty good deal as you'll have 4 certification titles for the price of three exams.

    To get an MCTS for Vista, you need to pass the MCTS: Windows Vista - Configuration exam 70-620
    To get an MCTS for 7, you need to pass the MCTS: Windows 7 - Configuration exam 70-680

    To get an MCITP for Vista, you need to pass the MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician exam 70-622 (on top of 70-620)
    To get an MCITP for 7, you need to pass the MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator 7 exam 70-686 which is coming soon (on top of 70-620)

    To upgrade an MCDST to MCITP (and gives you the MCTS as well), you need to attempt exam 70-621

    Finally, To get an additional MCITP for Vista, you need to pass the MCITP: Consumer Support Technician exam 70-623 (on top of an MCDST, MCTS and MCITP of the previous exams)


    Much more detail over here: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/cert-overview.aspx
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2009
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, MCDST, MOS, CIW, Comptia
    WIP: Win7/Lync2010/MCM
  3. sweetpea80

    sweetpea80 New Member

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    Erm...I wasn't asking about IT certifications... I am asking about IT degrees for someone who doesn't have a IT diploma and is working as Desktop Technicians, thanks!8)
     
  4. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    How about the FdSc Computer Networking (Foundation degree), see here for an example.

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  5. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    With modest school grades you should be able to get into a BSc degree....as you can see i did mine in Computer Network Management and Design.
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  6. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    What?
    On an IT certification forum? :biggrin

    A degree or diploma is probably overkill for desktop support.
    It'll fill your head with loads of stuff that, while useful, isn't really relevant to your everyday job.
    IT certs tend to focus on real world everyday skills and scenarios.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  7. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    You don't need a degree to do desktop support.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  8. Evilwheato

    Evilwheato Kilobyte Poster

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    I would think Desktop Support (especially first line) is more about skills (trouble shooting, communication, telephone manner) rather than knowledge? It's very hard to teach someone a skill compared to teaching someone knowledge (how to code for example).
     
  9. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    I would say you will learn more relevant skills doing the job for 2-3 years (and be much better off financially), than by doing a degree, a degree is no guarantee of work, in fact employers may be put off as they will assume you will be bored in the role.

    As others have said it would be worth focussing on on MCDST, A+, Network+ and getting yourself a more solid base of certification, combined with the experience on your CV, will make you much more attractive to future employers.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  10. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    What? Because someone gets a degree, they would be bored in a desktop support role? That makes no sense
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  11. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    That is true. You also dont need the A+, Network+ or MCDST to do desktop support. :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  12. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    Because the topics covered in degree level are nothing to do with desktop support, and sometimes Desktop support doesnt utilise any of the skills you will pay to learn at university.

    In my HND we did lots of networking, we didnt do any desktop support.

    If someone is going into management or is specialising in server or network side then I would recommend University as an option, although lots of courses and tracks such as ITIL, CCNA/CCNP, MCSE (or the new technology specialist tracks), or any of the project management and soft skills would fill in more than adequately.

    In fact Universities are using lots of these in their own curriculum, so why not keep earning and learn at your companies expense.

    As for the bored comment, if you got a good grade in uni for server work, or networking etc (some of the interesting stuff), and your job role (which this is a decent description of what Desktop support is) involves sorting peoples outlook/word/excel issues and many monotonous job responsibilities you will quickly feel undervalued and frustrated that your skillset isnt being utilised to a level you would like.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  13. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    Despite that fact in degree's you probably look at more interesting technologies, i was more than happy leaving uni and getting experience working in an IT dept, and getting experience working with the end user's, the same as someone who never did a degree. I think having my degree will be of more use in the future than now, but it still allowed me to get my first job in IT and will have been a factor in getting my new job. I definately do not think employers are put off by people with degree's. Quite a strange comment really.
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  14. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    I do desktop support, and found virtually every computing-related degree appeared to be either mind-boggingly boring or utterly, utterly, utterly irrelevant to my job.

    Consequently, I started a degree that will actually interest me (BA in Modern Languages).

    By the time I've finished that part time (5 years) I will be looking to do an MSc in Advanced Networking - both more involved and more interesting than a generalised computing degree, and relevant to where I eventually want to take myself vocationally and academically. And I won't have spent a yawn-inducing 5 years on java, programming models, or any of the other programming *whatever* to get there.

    No offense programmers, but it's just not my cup of tea. I call our developer the Master of the Dark Arts.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  15. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    I have pointed out and numbered some of the things you have said there which support the fact a uni degree is overkill for a desktop support role.

    You have made some Fair points, and yes everyone is different, [1] (and btw glad you have the right viewpoing about progressing in IT), some people [2]however go finish Uni and expect to be working with servers and high end tech straight away.

    [3] However You do say that your degree will be more useful in future, and that is the key here, as you move up the chain university credentials do become more in demand, I have yet to see an advert for desktop support which demands university as a prerequisite or even desired.

    [4] Employers will look at many things when they hire someone, one of the things is how long they will keep someone in the role, someone who goes to university is likely ambitious, and will have done some level of management training while there, a desktop support role is the bottom of the ladder for some people, while others get their "thrills" from fixing issues and are happy to stay at that level.
    Experience of employers will show that someone who has done training, or education to a higher level role, will see this sort of role as a stepping stone, which means 12-18 months time it is likely they will be hiring again.

    Now this is certainly not saying employers will not hire Uni grads, and I havent said that, however experience has shown me that it doesnt help like it used too


    Check this report out for what CIO's are saying about graduates.

    http://management.silicon.com/careers/0,39024671,39506212,00.htm
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2009
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  16. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    Yep, i see what your saying. My mistake i guess was presuming was that someone who was wanting a desktop support role also had ambitions to progress through IT. If that is the case, getting a degree is useful. If you plan on getting into IT, and only staying at desktop support level throughout your career then like you i would say having a degree would not be so worthwhile.

    I would add though, not all companies would not hire someone becuase they are ambitious. Alot of companies will have positions higher which someone can progress to. My previous comany didn't have such a position, but even still, when i handed in my notice they accepted that they knew i was "never going to be a lifer" with them.
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  17. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    No, you don't... but the A+, Network+, and MCDST will help you get a desktop support job, whereas a degree is not as helpful in getting a desktop support job. As stated by myself and others, a degree will often get you passed over for those sorts of jobs... which, if you're starting out, is NOT a good thing.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

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