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-= Career advice =-

Discussion in 'General Microsoft Certifications' started by guffyhacker, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. guffyhacker

    guffyhacker New Member

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    I recently finished my A level which I got C over 2years in college.Previously I studyed GNVQ foundation :dry which I got merit in that and BCs ECDL level 1 (part 1).Now I moved to London I want to become PC maintenance guy/1st line support,etc working around IT banking area.Please suggest my future plans?
    1.To do CompTIA A+
    2.Any point doing ECDL level 2 ?
    3.To do MCSE 2003
    4.Get a job

    thank you :biggrin
     
    Certifications: GNVQ Found.ICT,A level ICT,ECDL Level 1
    WIP: A+ & MCSE
  2. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    IMHO ECDL is really for people who do not have any experience with using a computer at all. I'd do the N+ after the A+. I'd try and get a job whilst doing the A+.
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  3. guffyhacker

    guffyhacker New Member

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    You said to do N+ after A+ i mean i don`t really want to da networking as its not me fav. area ;/
     
    Certifications: GNVQ Found.ICT,A level ICT,ECDL Level 1
    WIP: A+ & MCSE
  4. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    Well with the MCSE you would have exposure to networking.
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  5. guffyhacker

    guffyhacker New Member

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    I know there will be a topic on it (MCSE) but why go for N+ spending 6weeks on course (plus spend extra 700)?As I`m goin to do MSCE in January!
     
    Certifications: GNVQ Found.ICT,A level ICT,ECDL Level 1
    WIP: A+ & MCSE
  6. wizard

    wizard Petabyte Poster

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    You don't have to go to a training provider for any of those courses, you can go the self study route and save yourself lots of money 8)
     
    Certifications: SIA DS Licence
    WIP: A+ 2009
  7. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    You can do all those courses self study, all you need to do is get the relevant books.

    If you dont want to work in Networking why go for the MSCE as people with that are genrally involved in networking.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    If you don't want to do networking then you will find great difficulty in getting a job, IMHO.

    Particularly in large companies networking ability is now a must-have.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  9. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Move point 4 up around points 1 or 2. You'll never get to point 3 without experience.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  10. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Oh, there won't be "a topic on it"... there will be *entire exams* on it. Check the titles of these exams:

    70-291: Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
    70-293: Planning and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure

    ...and that doesn't take into account the exams that require networking knowledge, but don't list "Network" in their titles.

    If you don't like networking... you REALLY won't like the MCSE... nor will you like IT work much, unless you want to just be a PC technician... and the salary for that tops out at a low level rather quickly.

    Wiz and GBL are right in that you can do these certifications without a training provider. I gained all my certifications through self-study and on-the-job experience.

    Trip is correct in that you need to get a job after you get your A+, because the MCSE won't help you get into the field without experience. That said... if you don't enjoy networking, you should really take some time to re-evaluate your career plans.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Something Michael said made me realize you may not know that the MCSE cert is composed of about 7 different exams, each one (more or less) increasing in difficulty as you go along. Here's the official list from Microsoft:

    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/windows2003/default.mspx

    As far as getting a job in IT support before really tackling some of the MCSE exams, one of the reasons for this is that you can't just study out of a book and expect to pass them all. The tests don't just examine your book knowledge but your understanding and experience in the relevant areas. Without having worked with a Windows domain and server infrastructure, you will have little to no hope of ever passing all of the exams and earning the certification. This is a years long commitment. Just ask anyone who has honestly become an MCSE.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  12. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    That sentence right there is the key. You can become an MCSE dishonestly too. However, all you'll have is a piece of paper, and that piece of paper will not help you get a job, or keep it if you get one.

    The only MCSE of any real value is the one earned honestly. To that it does take years. I did mine in a little less than 2 years, but if you count the hours I put in, it would be the equivalent of more than 3 years at 8 hours a day of study and hands-on practice with the technology. That's a whole lot of time and effort. And, I had a small home network to work with. I had domain servers, workstations, dns servers, dhcp servers, Wins servers, file servers, etc... installed on my network. I had also worked enough to understand how a business apportions out information via computer to employees so I had an idea of what to think about in setting up a domain, group policies, and security.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  13. guffyhacker

    guffyhacker New Member

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    i`ll try to get a part-time job before a+ as i need to pay for a msce but like most of you said "self-learning" is not an option.Believe me, i`v tryed for few months to get a job as a result ui got a big fat O.:dry
    well I guess,i have to survive in this business i`m going to try networking :biggrin
     
    Certifications: GNVQ Found.ICT,A level ICT,ECDL Level 1
    WIP: A+ & MCSE
  14. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

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    Is self learning is 'not an option', it shows lack of motivation and determination, both of which you really need to survive and be successful in this field.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  15. guffyhacker

    guffyhacker New Member

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    I can be sometimes lazy but this time it`s 100% on MCSE and A+ ;]
    Still not sure about N+.
     
    Certifications: GNVQ Found.ICT,A level ICT,ECDL Level 1
    WIP: A+ & MCSE
  16. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    I would strong advise against going for the MCSE at this moment in time for you:

    And that does not mean 1 year at helpdesk level.

    The best route for you, imo, would be the A+, Network+ then maybe work up to the MCSA 2k3 level.

    Don't worry about not self-studying, there are different methods of learning and not everyone is comfortable doing only one method.

    You will see that alot of people recommend doing the Network+, this isn't just because people are suggesting it without reason. The reason behind it is because by doing the Network+, you will develop the basics that you need for the 70-291 exam (which is a core requirement for the MCSE and the MCSA).

    I will also say that Professional creds/certs should reflect your job role/responsibilities and the higher end Professional creds (eg MCSE, CCNP, CCIE, etc) should not be used for entry level positions.

    I don't want to sound as if I'm trying to put your study plan down, I just want to try to get your study plan to a realistic level, I'm basing it on question you asked about the ECDL part 2 as well as you trying to get into the world of IT.

    -Ken

    p.s. Please do not fall for the sales pitches that state that if you do this or that course you'll get a job for £20k-£30k straight away
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  17. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    What he said... top-notch advice.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

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