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Advice on big decision

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by jodsclass, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Hey Guys. Not been on here for a while. I have been very busy since I started as a Web Developer 4 months back. The problem is, i hate the job. I'm classed as a junior but my workload is at senior level. Furthermore, we have no senior developers, just me and another junior (who knows very little and is constantly seeking my help). So technically im teaching myself, and earning a tiny wage, whilst the workload and stress continues to mount on me.

    Ive Decided that

    A) I don't like development, and prefer it as a hobby as it has always been for me

    B) I'm a technician through and through, I deal with servers and such at work and I'm solely responsible for our rackspace Colo servers (which is the only positive aspect of my job)

    C) I want to concentrate on my certs, I need and want to get certified and feel like I have lost focus on my goals.

    The idea my wife and I have had, is that I quit my job at the end of November with 6 months experience under my belt, and spend December and January finishing off my A+ and Network+. Obviously this is a big step to take, to leave my job and study whilst my wife brings home the bacon. Do you guys think I'm approaching this right?

    Thanks for your help

    Jodsclass

    P.S. There are many other reasons for me to leave this posistion including poor management, poor working environment and no opportunity for progression.
     
    Certifications: BSc IT & Web Development
    WIP: MSc Advanced Computing, Oracle Cert
  2. Baba O'Riley

    Baba O'Riley Gigabyte Poster

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    I suppose it depends on what you can afford.

    One question, how can you be a junior developer if there are no seniors? Surely you're just a plain vanilla developer! Have you raised these problems with your boss, you could always try asking for more money, especially if you're going to leave anyway. Use it as a bargaining tool.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+
    WIP: 70-270
  3. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Hmmm, it's always tough to try and give somebody good advice when one doesn't know all the underlying circumstances. I agree with Baba, you should discuss this with your boss, as you say you are his king pin web developer whether you like it or not. Therefore, if you leave they are going to be in deep $hit for a while whilst they find a replacement and train them up. This gives you great bargaining power. You may be able to lever your position into one where you enjoy your job if you make it clear to the powers that be, you are uncomfortable in your present role and will be looking elsewhere unless things change. Tell them that you have now realised web development is not your bag, you find it tedious and stressful or whatever.

    You already support their servers and that part of the job you enjoy. What strikes me is that it could be a long time in the future that you get the chance to get that kind of hands on experience. Six months is not as good on your CV a year. Your future job prospects could count on that figure.

    Hence, I would stick it out and try and tailor what you have already rather than taking time out to study, adding months of unemployment to your CV will not enhance your employability.

    Good luck in whatever you decide!

    Pete
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  4. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Jod,

    I agree with what has been said, don't leave unless you really, really have to. I know you hate it, but at least you have a job and can look for another.
    Best of luck :thumbleft

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  5. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    Sorry to hear it's not working out for you. I've been i the position where the job was misrepresented and I ended up doing stuff that I actually got into IT so I'd never have to do it (selling/negotiating).

    I think you should start looking for something else because it's easier to find a job while you're in work than if you're unemployed. I know it sounds like a lot of extra work but maybe you could study around work.

    You could turn this situation to your advantage and highlight on your CV/applications that you are experienced in 'wearing different hats' and doing the job of more than one person whilst learning and being in at the deep end etc - these are the kind of skills employers love.

    What would happen if you were to hand in your notice or even just tell your boss off the record that you're not happy and want to move on?
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  6. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    i say no dont quit the job... you were waiting months for it an now you want to stop? its a job and its bringing in money.. money to help fund your certs! studying will be expensive and exam prices arent cheap either so to me that would be one reason to stay on. Plus you could do even more down if you stop and struggle to find another IT job. Stick it out man - and to let you know my last job stank but i stayed on for the experience and because it helped fund my ms certs and i knew i was heading to uni so stuff them - think the same, make the most of your time there and get some experience under your belt.
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  7. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Personally I would not quit the job, as you know its tough to get a break in IT so do you really want to put yourself through that again? 6 months experience and having the A+ and N+ on your C.V does not guarantee a job.

    As you said there are some positive aspects of your job so try to focus on them as much as you can. Also why not put the time in to do your certs after work? That’s what many of us are doing so there is no reason to quit your job just to nail some certs. You could probably get both done in 6 months if you put the time in and by then your C.V will have 1 years experience on it.

    Best of luck on whatever you decide m8 8)
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  8. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Thanks for the advice guys. The problem is, the problems do run deeper than simply not enjoying my job. Its a small company, with 3 employee's and 2 bosses. We work out of a flat, which isnt ideal, and the progression within the role is not existent.

    I'm classed as a junior so they can pay me less (£12k at present) which is pretty bad for the amount of work I do. The work has also started encroaching on my private life, and I get phonecalls from the boss when I'm not there to help customers. If I was compensated for this, I wouldnt mind, but I'm seriously not.

    Furthermore, My wife and I are wanting to buy a house, a stipulation of our mortgage is that we both hold work contracts, and have held said contracts for at least 6 months. My wife has this covered but my employer refuses to give me a contract, saying he never offers contracts. He wont even make an exception to help me out. He holds the same viewpoint on my payrise, and even said to me that he wouldn't have any trouble employing another developer. I'm almost out of bargaining power and I feel like my boss beleive I'm relying on the job, which I'm not.

    I really don't want to give up the security of my job, and my pay packet, however it is preventing us purchasing a house, and as long as I am in this role, we will be unable to progress.

    What a decision. I'll keep you posted, my feeling at present is to work untill the end of November then have a month studying before Christmas. This would let me take exams in January and resume my job hunt. But I'm still weighing up the pros and cons.

    Perhaps this wasnt so much a question, more trying to get your opinions on my prediciment, and for your responses I'm truly greatful.

    Thanks guys

    Jodsclass
     
    Certifications: BSc IT & Web Development
    WIP: MSc Advanced Computing, Oracle Cert
  9. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Ahhh, not good mate.

    Actually I was in a similar position to you a couple of years ago. I worked with a small IT company and did their in-house IT support and also supported their software products. I got absolutely shafted in terms of pay. I was working long hours and migrating their network from NT to 2003 while also finishing off an app written in C++ by a developer who had legged it.

    Eventually I had enough and found another job and handed in my notice. When I talked to the MD he said I had little experience when he took me on but he gave me a project (NT migration) that would kick start my career so we both got something out of the whole arrangement. He didn’t have to outsource the migration and I gained some valuable experience.

    On my last day the finance director (total bitch) said she could hire another graduate for £12k after I had left and it was ‘no big deal’ that I was leaving, charming! That’s what happened, another guy took over (knew his stuff) but now he has also left.

    The best thing is that the next guy fuked up as he didn’t notice one of the discs had failed in the RAID. He left this and another disc failed, bye bye exchange server! From what I have heard (I still know one of the developers) the whole mail system has been lost as the guy didn’t have any disaster recovery planned for the exchange server. I shouldn’t laugh but the guy ended up just leaving as he said he didn’t need the grief of the whole thing, classic! :biggrin

    Rant over, but I guess it shows that there are companies out there that don’t give a toss about their employees. They just hire some bright graduates and bleed them dry until the next one comes along.

    From what you have said I would start to apply for jobs right now. You said you need a contract for your mortgage but remember you also need a job! 8)
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  10. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Thanks sparky. I'll take that Onboard. I'm a pretty thrifty person and have enough of my wages to cver my living expenses for 4 months, and we have, and can live off my wifes wage alone. If we where desperate for the cash, I would stay without question, but as you so rightly put it, I could be doing without the greif of this work. I'm constantly fixing mistakes in customers Web Apps, which have been caused by various developers working on the same project and picking up after the previous developer left off. The company has been through 4 developers in 8 months! Its a nightmare, and the lack of commenting and standardisation in the code makes it nearly impossible to figure out.

    I'm just at the stage where I have no time for the job or the boss. I setup our latest coporate site, and I hard coded my email address into all contact forms to originally keep an eye on their status, however I never removed this code, and I have seen how much money the 2 bosses are making off my back. 1 project I completed in 4 days, I worked my ass off on a complete Finance Company portal with CMS, they made £3k off it, and paid me £220. They won't give me a payrise, but I figured that I made the company £9k last month in application development!

    Obviously I can't use this in my arguement as this information is confidential and I technically should never see it, however seeing what they are earning, and what they are paying, I can see I'm being 'Bled Dry' as Sparky put it.

    Complete Jokers

    Jodsclass
     
    Certifications: BSc IT & Web Development
    WIP: MSc Advanced Computing, Oracle Cert
  11. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Yup, it does sound like you are getting a raw deal. :x

    One thing to note though when you start getting interviews for new jobs is just to mention the positive stuff (I’m sure you already know this!) as its easy to go into a rant about how crap your current employer is and how you would like to tell them where to stick their job etc etc.

    :biggrin :biggrin :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  12. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Noted Sparky, I can imagine that would put an employer off, especially if I mentioned my desire to sabotage the development process :twisted: :twisted:

    Jodsclass
     
    Certifications: BSc IT & Web Development
    WIP: MSc Advanced Computing, Oracle Cert
  13. Baba O'Riley

    Baba O'Riley Gigabyte Poster

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    Mate, see this quote from the Cizizen's Advice Bureau:
    If you can prove to your bank that you have been paid regularly for the last six months by the same people, this should be enough to prove you've been under contract (I hope).

    As for the rest of it, threaten to bail and see what they say. If they think they can do without you then start looking for something else. Although, as the others say, you may find it difficult getting something else. Good luck what ever you choose.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+
    WIP: 70-270
  14. fortch

    fortch Kilobyte Poster

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    Boy, is *that* an understatement. Bluerinse (and others) hit the nail right on the head. Experience is your best friend when jobhunting. I've said it before -- certs get you through HR, experience (and a stable work record) get you the job. Period. Employers are very wary of a shoddy work history.

    That said, I understand about loathing a job. I was in a similar situation, and now that I *did* resign, I should have stayed there, if just for the steady work experience and linearity in my CV. You are honing some very talented skills, and if you think quitting to concentrate on certs will help your situation, you may be mistaken.

    However, if it's too much stress, then your health is most important... and life's too short to work a job you hate. Ugh, enough with the cliches ... :rolleyes:

    Good luck with whatever you decide!
     
    Certifications: A+,Net+,Sec+,MCSA:Sec,MCSE:Sec,mASE

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