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Advice for youngsters.

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by wagnerk, Oct 27, 2005.

  1. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    This one is for all the youngsters that have just got their 1st job in IT

    1. Be polite
    2. If you know you need some time off, let your manager know before hand, not the night before via text (unless it's unavoidable)
    3. Don't only listen to half a conversation - get all the facts straight.
    4. Work your notice.
    5. Don't resign by text message.
    6. If you have a job to do, DO IT. Don't leave it for someone else to do.
    7. If you need help ASK. Do not think that asking for help show weakness.
    8. If there is a problem - talk.
    9. Don't take for granted that you'll be doing all your NVQ's/studying at work. This is a two way thing, you'll have to do some of it in your own time.
    10. If you have finished all your jobs & see a co-worker struggling, offer your assistance - s/he will do the same for you.
    11. If you're given passwords/access codes/keys - DO NOT shared it with anyone, especially people outside your organisation.
    12. Reviews & Assessments are not only for the company's benefit, but also your own.
    13. When someone asks you a question, DO NOT lie or b*lls*it, go and find out the answer.
    14. You applied for the job, you were hired to do the job - do not sit down and surf the internet all day just because you're a member of the IT department when there are jobs to do (unless that's what you were hired to do, and I don't mean you can't do this during breaks)

    This list is just a couple of things off the top of my head, that I have experience as a co-worker and a senior tech, that has annoyed me. You kinda get a picture what I've put up with...

    Hope that this helps someone. If you're experiencing it - You're not alone. If you're causing it - please change.

    (p.s. - please do not think that I'm having a go at all youngsters, or that I class everyone in the same boat, I don't.)
     
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  2. moominboy

    moominboy Gigabyte Poster

    cheers for that mate, few good pointers to remember! :tongue
     
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  3. drum_dude

    drum_dude Gigabyte Poster

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    Here's a few answers/comments to your points:

    1. Be polite This comes from how the person was brought up and no matter what you say it cannot be just turned on like a tap! It's the fault of the employer for taking on an impolite person!

    2. If you know you need some time off, let your manager know before hand, not the night before via text (unless it's unavoidable) Again this is down to the type of person, but I do understand your point...a little notice would not cause harm!

    3. Don't only listen to half a conversation - get all the facts straight. For every story there is a storyteller! On some occasions the storytelller is not very concise...this can be applied to arsehead users that are incapable of talking in a concise manner - especially when they realise they are talking to a youngster.

    4. Work your notice. Why? Perhaps they just can't stand working at the place - it happens!

    5. Don't resign by text message. Is that because you or the manager is totally unapproachable?

    6. If you have a job to do, DO IT. Don't leave it for someone else to do. This is down to the work culture and every workplace is like this or did you mean don't leave it for a grown up to do?

    7. If you need help ASK. Do not think that asking for help show weakness. Perhaps they don't ask because those around them are - again - unapproachable? I've worked in enviroments where I was scared stiff to ask a question due to the bad vibes I picked up from people!

    8. If there is a problem - talk. Not that easy...see above!

    9. Don't take for granted that you'll be doing all your NVQ's/studying at work. This is a two way thing, you'll have to do some of it in your own time. Well that is down to the training policy of the company.

    10. If you have finished all your jobs & see a co-worker struggling, offer your assistance - s/he will do the same for you. See my answer to point 6.

    11. If you're given passwords/access codes/keys - DO NOT shared it with anyone, especially people outside your organisation. That is a crimnal offence - Data Protection Act - and doesn't apply just to youngsters! Let the law and your firm deal with that!

    12. Reviews & Assessments are not only for the company's benefit, but also your own. Normally an excuse to have a "pop" at certain people!

    13. When someone asks you a question, DO NOT lie or b*lls*it, go and find out the answer. But what if that someone is pressurising them for a quick answer? A young inexperienced person would see this as fight or flight!

    14. You applied for the job, you were hired to do the job - do not sit down and surf the internet all day just because you're a member of the IT department when there are jobs to do (unless that's what you were hired to do, and I don't mean you can't do this during breaks) In my experience youngsters have always asked to use the internet! It's the older people we have a problem with! However, Internet usage is down to the policy of your firm.
     
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  4. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Some cracking advice guys- thanks. :)
     
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  5. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I think the aforementioned advice is appropriate for people of all ages. I have worked with some amazing youngsters and some lazy good for nothing older guys and vice versa.

    If you want to get on in life and you want to attain a position of responsibility with a decent salary and possibly even a company car, you must always be professional. Being professional covers all the things mentioned and more. Appearance, time keeping, reliability, productivity etc and your people skills. These things are more important than your skills with computers!
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  6. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I tend to think of a work ethic as an age thing but that's just me. When I worked my slave job at the post office, I outworked kids less than half my age. Not because I was faster or stronger or had better reflexes. In every measurable way, they were physically superior to me and should have made me look like a sloth. The difference was that I gave a damn about my performance and I had the morals and ethics to back it up.

    Having said that, I agree with Pete. Some older guys can be dogs and some younger kids can be hungry for the job and do whatever it takes. Bottom line is to put out your best, regardless of whether or not you think you are appreciated or not. Ultimately, you are not working for them...you are working for you.
     
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  7. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I think Trip's post really says what I think this entire thread boils down to: Attitude is everything. Everyone sees it, except for maybe the person with the attitude. Attitude is unmistakeable. It colors everything we think, do, and say.

    We can fool people at just about everything in life, but we can't fool them about our attitudes. Having the right attitude will make an old man outwork a young man, and cause him to go home at the end of the day less tired too.
     
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  8. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Yes, now that reminds me of a plane flight to Bulgaria for a skiing trip a few years back. I was with a party of about sixteen people, young and old and two members of the party were vegetarians. When the food started being served the leader of our group summoned the air stewardess and brought to her attention the fact that two people in his group were vegetarians and that he was one of them. I should point out that the food being served was a meat stew of unrecognisable content. She, the stewardess bluntly stated that he should have written to them and have a letter confirming that vegetarian meals would be served. He said I have, and promptly pulled his copy from his pocket. Her words have stayed with me ever since and particularly because this man was such a polite easy going chap. "I don't like your attitude" she hissed at him, turned on her heals and walked off.

    There is no need to ask who you lot think had *the attitude*

    The ski trip wasn't all that great either, took me a few weeks to get over the food poisoning :eek:
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)

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