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Adding PC to the domain in windows server 2008

Discussion in 'Software' started by zr79, Aug 19, 2009.

  1. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    So, on the server PC, once you have run dcpromo, selected new forest, installed the DNS server, selected static or dynamic ip in other workds once you have installed an active directory domain and a dns server what do you do then.

    How do you connect the PC's on the newtork(well just switch just now) to the domain, do you go into each PC and just add the domain name in computer settings or do you add the PC to the domain from the server, i.e in AD?
     
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  2. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    You should be reading up on how to do this yourself - its pointless asking people to tell you how to do the most basic of tasks - you'll never learn anything that way. For what its worth to you, on the workstation you want to join to the domain, right click 'My Computer', select 'Properties', then the 'Computer Name' tab. Click the box marked 'Change' (next to 'rename this computer or join a domain') then type in the name of the domain in the 'member of' box and provide domain administrator credentials when prompted to do so. Wait about 10-30 seconds, then clcik 'OK' to all the prompts and reboot when asked to do so
     
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  3. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Unless you are joining the PC to the domain when you do an unattended install, you would do it the way zebulebu stated.

    You can precreate the computer accounts in AD, however that does not join the PC's to the domain.

    -ken
     
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  4. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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  5. LukeP

    LukeP Gigabyte Poster

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    Which happens to be useful when you deploy multiple machines from ghost images on to pre-created AD accounts
     
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  6. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Exactly, the computer accounts are in the correct OU so as soon as they boot-up/log-in they get the correct settings from day 1 :)

    -ken
     
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  7. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    Ok i think i have that one sorted.

    Admin changes the domain name and DNS on the workstation to point to the server etc.
    Admin adds the workstation to AD and then i think you have to update the group policy on the workstation
    hmmm i suppose there are scripts to do these things fatser

    Now i have another question which i am sure you guys will know the answer as usual :) i have googled.

    Should be an easy one but i want to check before I install another OS.

    On virtual PC 2007 i have installed Server 2008. Now i want to install another OS/host, win xp, do i just run the wizard again the same as for installing 2008 so that i create a new virtual machine so that this would mean that the 2 OS's, server 2008 and XP are virtually networked inside PC 2007 so that i could domain them, or do i install the XP OS different in order for it to be in the right relationship to the Server 2008 OS.?
     
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  8. wagnerk
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    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Most likely a client PC will gain an IP address from the DHCP server, unless it is all statically assigned (IP, subnet, DNS, etc), so all you would have to do is this:

    [​IMG]

    Nope same way, just make sure that you either set both network cards as local (so only the server and client can see each other) or set both to whatever your real nic is, otherwise the server and the client will not see each other.

    To be honest, I would strongly recommend you studying the MCDST before you start on any server, especially 2008. 2008 is more complex than 2003. And besides alot of companies will still be using 2003 for a good few years to come, at least for another 5 years, if not longer.

    -ken
     
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  9. LukeP

    LukeP Gigabyte Poster

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    Which as I understand you will have to set up as well (home lab)


    I second that. Next two servers I will be deploying are going to be Windows Server 2003 (due to hardware reqs and 2 servers machines capable of running it already in house). Windows Server 2008 is absolutely stunning but as Ken said it's a lot more complex.

    On the side note: The difference between 2003 and 2008 isn't as big as I find it to be between 2000 and 2003. I find it really hard to find what I'm looking for in Windows Server 2000. (1 branch still runs Win 2000 domain and I can't be really bothered to anything apart from "firefighting" until I'll have time and management approval for new hardware and 2008 version)
     
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  10. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    It's not that big a deal really, there is always a 2 to 3 day harsh learning curve for me with something new and then things smooth off.

    Ok so i see i can set the adapters to local as you said i can also set them to shared networking(NAT) , setting them to shared(NAT) lets me use the real internet.

    Now i only have a cable modem installed no router, so the shared NAT must software NAT the virtual connection i think but in the Virtual host the networking settings are,

    IP = 192.168.131.66
    mask 255.255.255.0
    DG = 192.168.131.254
    DHCP = 192.168.131.254
    DNS = 194.168.4.100 (my actual PC's DNS)

    Now my actual PC has an IP 80.xxx.xxx.xxx etc...

    I just haven't clicked how the shared(NAT) givese the above IP's to the VH PC...

    And if i set the VH PC to use my actual PC's adapter then i guess as i don't have a router i can't give it a static IP but also setting the VH IP to DHCP i get the cant connect error and it defauts back to a 169 private APIPA (yes i know what this is) IP.

    So what i am saying is,

    1) Apart from the shared NAT how do i set a VH PC up to connect to the internet
    2) How do you come to the above IPs.
     
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  11. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    Give the server 2 NIC's, the first being a local only connection inside the virtual network, and the second should have a connection to the physical network (bridged). Then set the server up as a router to provide NAT inside the virtual network. You will also need to set up DNS forwarders on your virtual DNS server.
     
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  12. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    Yup got the DNs forward and reverse zones setup, actually server 2008 does all that for you when you install the AD domain controller services thorugh DCPROMO, server 2003 does i know you usually have to do that manually.

    So i have a server(2008) and workstation(XP Pro) both setup on static IP, it all works great i have a domain!

    Now as you said make the server into a software router and route the WS through it on the real NET, good idea, but how do i point the server at my cable modem public IP of 80.192.xxx.xxx?
     
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  13. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    Guys.

    In Virtual PC 2007 if i choose the network connection type in the virtual settings as "Shared connection (NAT)" then i get given the following,

    IP = 192.168.131.66
    DG = 192.168.131.254
    DHCP = 192.168.131.254
    Mask = 255.255.255.0

    Now i have to use my real DNS IP's and then i can connect online, cool.

    Now from trying it looks like you are given an IP pool of

    192.168.131.64 - 192.168.131.191

    So,

    1) So why did they use this 131 subnet what is the relevance of that.

    2) How did they get this IP pool of 127 useable IP's if it is using a default class C mask

    3) I can also choose a network connection type of,

    Local
    My real NIC Realtek RTL8139

    SO why do i have the choice to choose my real NIC (well virtual real NIC really if you see what i mean) as well as Shared NAT, why would i ever choose my real RTL8139 connection in the virtual PC settings?


    Can someone enlighten me here.

    Thanks for any help.
     
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