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A+ 2006 or 2009 whats the difference?

Discussion in 'A+' started by bubs, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. bubs

    bubs Bit Poster

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    Hi

    I currently about halfway throught studying 2006 A+. I have the Labsim/testout CDs and feel confident i can pass before 2009 completely takes over. But what is the major differences between 2006 and 2009, obviously 2009 will be focused on vista ddr 3 ram, multicore processors. I just think what if i sign up 4 testout 2009 and do that instead, or should i study my ass off and try to pass 2006 before it closes. Does anyone know the expiry date for UK 601+602 exam?

    Many Thanks
    Bubs
     
    WIP: A+
  2. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    The expiry date for the UK version of A+ 2006/7 is August 31st 2010, if you pass this before then you will be certified for life however if you decide to take the 2009 exam and do not pass it before 31st december 2011 then you will have to recertify every 3 years.

    study your ass of and get the 2006 version out of the way, it doesn't matter to employers which version you have.

    I am not sure what the new A+ covers but it may include Vista and may include questions on ddr3 but apart from that I don't think there will be anything else, it may mention USB 3. The current A+ covers multi core processors anyway.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  3. bubs

    bubs Bit Poster

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    Thanks for that greenbrucelee (great name by the way he's a true legend) By the way also. Would it be possible to pass a+ just by tesout/labsim. I got mike meyers book but it bores me stiff, I think old mike meyers tends to waffle on a wee bit. Besides i learn better of vids than reading to be honest. Has oneone passed A+ just by using testout/labsim?
     
    WIP: A+
  4. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I'd never just use a video for learning, I'd also never just use one book either.

    proffesser messer is a good site to learn from as is proprofs both are free but generally its a bad idea to use free sites for certs as most of them are braindumps and if you are caught using them to pass your exams then you can be decertified for life and possible legal action could be put against you.

    Unfortunately studying certs isn't cheap and you only get what you pay for when it comes to practice exams and study tools.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  5. bubs

    bubs Bit Poster

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    cheers greenbrucelee.

    One quick question i have labsim/testout 601+602. I find them pretty good. I believe there explainations of certain things can be brief, BUT for example about ESB and PSU's the segments are about 10 minutes all together, Well as you probably know, in my Mike Meyers Books he woffles on for about 30-40 pages.I mean is 30-40 pages really that nessesary? Dont get me wrong if after doing a section on testout i refer to the mikes book for more insight. But i have a general interest in PCs and the techy stuff, but i really cant stomach reading the whole book, even to me who enjoys A+. Has anyone on this site passed A+ 601/602 using labsim/testout alone? The book maybe boring to me as i hate reading. I really wish i could like reading but i dont?

    Thanks
     
    WIP: A+
  6. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    The way I see it you will probably learn more from Mike Meyers than you will from testout. Testout should be seen as something to accompany the Mike Meyers book, although there are far better practice exam and simulator providers out there. Such as www.Boson.com

    A problem that I see with you is that you need to force yourself to read because IT is a constant learning experience you don't just get in and then that it plus the fact that you need to read and take in information from various screens especially if you go into networking or working with servers. I mean if you hate reading how will you do an IT job if you don't like reading, sometimes there could be lots of scripts or code srolling down the screen and you have to try and identify a line that needs amending.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  7. bubs

    bubs Bit Poster

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    I mean dont get me wrong. I do dislike reading but, It is mainly the Mike Meyers book. I personally think he goes on too much about certain things. Some parts of the book i cant put down as its so interesting, like personally i liked the CPU section, RAM, Hard Drives. I really could not put the book down, But the other sections i just cant find the same enthusiasim. Has you can tell, Im not a very educated, I find studying so hard. I have always fixed friends and families PC's, i even have a part-time voluntary in a computer shops. The point of A+ was to polish my knowledge, which i do feel is happening. Also while reading or watching videos is it best to take notes? I always take notes and find because i write things down i tend to remember things a bit easier. Thanks for replying tho GreenBruceLee
     
    WIP: A+
  8. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    CPU, RAM and HDDs are useless without all the other stuff. You need monitors, mice, speakers, printers etc, call them human interface devices if you like (and there's connectivity as well, networking etc). If you find them dull then maybe electronics rather than IT is your forte. Don't get me wrong, I find some of them deadly dull as well but the point is you'll be fairly useless as an IT Tech (or any job for that matter) unless you force yourself to spend the time understanding the dull bits as well.

    As regards notes, I was told when I went to Uni that you remember 20% of what you hear, 30% of what you read and 40% of what you write (the figures are obviously fudged but from experience I'd say the general gist was about right). Seeing, hearing and taking notes at the same time obviously increases the percentage of what you take in and writing things down using your own words tends to reinforce your understanding.
    So yes, fill yer boots on the note taking. I tend to distil down my initial notes as things settle into the old grey matter and I don't need to refer to particular parts of them any more.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  9. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Uh... 3?

    *tumbleweed*


    Sorry


    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  10. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Quoted for Truth. 8)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. bubs

    bubs Bit Poster

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    thanks soundian, I like loads of aspects of i.t but i was not guna write all of them, CPU RAM, HDD was just a quick example, as i find power supplys boring. But thanks anyway mate
     
    WIP: A+

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