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802.11b range

Discussion in 'Wireless' started by Boycie, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    MS Press book for 270 states <802.11b is availible at a low cost and has the best overall range>

    Is this the case?
    I thought b and g were both the same range wise.

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    It sounds a bit out of date - hardly surprising as WiFi is a very rapidly moving market. It is now quite hard to buy 'b' only kit!

    In general both b and g will drop the speed when conditions become difficult, as a slower speed will work better, so in that sense the book is right. But many people don't realize that the speed *has* dropped! :biggrin

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Harry,

    Yeah, a fair point. Latest edition of book print date 2005.

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  4. Twiggy

    Twiggy Bit Poster

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    Finally I can actually put to use something I learned on the networking course I did a couple of months ago!!

    IEEE 802 specifications demonstrate the following:

    802.11a = data rate of 11mgb/ps
    802.11b = data rate of 54mgb/ps
    802.11g = is compatible with both of the above data rates

    Although we weren't told this in so many words, I believe g was introduced because at that time, a & b were unable to communicate with each other.
     
    Certifications: ECDL BCS1, NCFE Networking Essentials
    WIP: HNC in Computing
  5. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Er - that isn't quite right!

    a is 54Mbps and b is 11Mbps. a is on a completely different frequency to b, so that is why they won't talk.
    g is the same speed as a, but on the same frequency as b, so they can interoperate (to some extent).

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  6. Twiggy

    Twiggy Bit Poster

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    Interesting... so basically I forked out £100+ on a networking course to be taught incorrectly?! Grate :dry

    Might go through my notes later, make sure it's not me making a blunder.
     
    Certifications: ECDL BCS1, NCFE Networking Essentials
    WIP: HNC in Computing
  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    This page from Wikipedia is a fairly good summary of the state of WiFi.

    Note that that page gives the same range for both b and g!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  8. Twiggy

    Twiggy Bit Poster

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    I'm wasn't questioning what you're telling me don't worry, I just want to check my course notes later anyway for my own sanity, to see what information they provided us with, or if somehow I got my a's and b's back to front. :blink

    I was aware that g had the same data rate as a, just that g is also meant to be compatible with b.
     
    Certifications: ECDL BCS1, NCFE Networking Essentials
    WIP: HNC in Computing
  9. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    The comment about rates was really a reference to Boyce's original question. :biggrin

    And I thought that the whole page was a useful addition to the various resources pointed to in this forum.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+

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