Which is best option NETWORK + or CCNA for Beginners without network backgraound

Discussion in 'Network+' started by Chispa2012, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. Chispa2012

    Chispa2012 New Member

    5
    0
    1
    Hi, i'm anthony i'm preparing to get my A + certificaion shortly , but my goal are to get into networking, i do not have background relate d to networking execpt what i'm learning in A + , so please which is the best option for me after A + network + or CCNA, which of them is more basic and easy to undertand? is CCNA easy or harder than Network +?

    PLease , give our opinion , thanks in advance.
     
  2. Coupe2T

    Coupe2T Megabyte Poster

    590
    43
    67
    Network+ is definitely easier than the CCNA and seen as the more entry level, so start there and then work up to the CCNA afterwards.

    The Net+ course is also not vendor specific, so covers all basics of networking which apply regardless of hardware, where as the CCNA is all Cisco. Having said that, I would say as far as Networking certs go then the Cisco ones are the highest regarded by employers. Still definitely start with Net+ though. Then do your CCNA afterwards.
     
    Certifications: ECDL, Does that Count!?!
  3. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,595
    440
    319
    Network+ first
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Office 365, Server 2016, CEH
  4. Notes_Bloke

    Notes_Bloke Terabyte Poster

    3,230
    54
    146
    Definitely the N+.

    NB
     
    Certifications: 70-210, 70-215, A+,N+, Security+
    WIP: MCSA
  5. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

    1,306
    49
    92
    I would go for the first part of the CCNA, ICND 1, which would give you the CCENT certification.
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  6. Beerbaron

    Beerbaron Megabyte Poster

    545
    9
    76
    Definitely N+ as CCNA is not an entry level cert and is vendor specific. N+ would give you the basics to go on to do the CCENT/CCNA. If you are not using Cisco equipment or have no exposure to it then you are at a disadvantage.
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), MSc, ITIL v3F, MCP, MCDST, MCITP: edst7, MCTS, MCSA: Server 2003, MCSA: Windows 7, N+, NVQ IT lvl 3, MCSA Windows 7, VCP5, CCENT, CEH
    WIP: CISSP
  7. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

    1,306
    49
    92
    Neither is Network+ if you look at their recommended entry requirements:

    Recommended experience - CompTIA A+ certification and nine months networking experience

    Cisco however market the CCENT as entry-level, and when you look at the topics, it is all basic networking knowledge:

    The exam includes topics on networking fundamentals; connecting to a WAN; basic security and wireless concepts; routing and switching fundamentals; the TCP/IP and OSI models; IP addressing; WAN technologies; operating and configuring IOS devices; configuring RIPv2, static and default routing; implementing NAT and DHCP; and configuring simple networks.

    Now, the fact it actually shows you how to use this knowledge on a network device is an added bonus, not a disadvantage. Network+ teaches these same topics, although you end up without the ability to actually do any of those things on an actual network device.

    EDIT: I would also add i don't ever see Network+ on network job requirements, however the phrase "cisco certifications a bonus" or "Cisco certified" is in pretty much them all.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  8. morph

    morph Byte Poster

    204
    3
    22
    i was asked to go on a CCNA course as soon as i got a trainee network role, however it blew my head of and I found it hard to get me head around, i went back started with the network + and the moved on, don't try and run before you can walk. It took me slightly longer to acheive things but i feel I've got a better understanding!
     
    Certifications: Network +, ITIL Foundation, CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: server/ccna security
  9. ps

    ps New Member

    1
    0
    28
    Network+ is elementary.
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons) | A+ | N+ | Sec+
    WIP: Server+
  10. The Zig

    The Zig Kilobyte Poster

    305
    19
    46
    Juniper Networks - the upstart - have some nice free training material on their site. Gives a very nice overview of networking (as a trainer I'll certainly be stealing adopting some of their models to explain concepts).
    You also get 50%-discount vouchers for JNCIA and two JNCIS certifications.

    You're welcome.
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+; Security+, CTT+; MCDST; 4 x MTA (Networking, OS, Security & Server); MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Support; MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Administrator; MCITP - Server Administrator; MCSA - Server 2008; MCT; IOSH; CCENT
    WIP: CCNA; Server 2012; LPIC; JNCIA?
  11. vishal383

    vishal383 New Member

    3
    0
    1
    I maybe wrong but try going for the Network+ exam, it should be comparatively less difficult than CCNA. Once you're done with it then you can try going out for something which is a little more advanced so that you don't get frustrated with it soon.
     
  12. FlashDangerpants

    FlashDangerpants Byte Poster

    133
    27
    49
    CCNA is relatively easy if you get through a good book on Ethernet and TCP/IP before you start learning the Cisco commands to monkey with them. Make sure it is one with some Wireshark.

    A 6 week delay before you start studying for an exam in order to learn the fundamental protocols will save you exponentially more time than it costs, and you will breeze through entry level interviews afterwards if you can talk usefully about packet packet capture etc. Most newbie CCNAs can't do that.
     
    Certifications: MCITP Exchange 2010, MCSA Svr 2012
    WIP: Exchange 2013

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.