Trying to get un-pigeonholed from desktop support

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by redfoot12, Nov 29, 2019.

  1. redfoot12

    redfoot12 New Member

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    So a little bit about my background...
    I first got interested in doing IT around 1999 when I took an MCSE course. I initially wanted to get into Windows administration but after the training, I felt a little overwhelmed and out of my depth. I decided to go back to school and got an Associate's in Business Admin and transferred to a university to complete a bachelor's in Information Systems. After a mediocre semester, my parents cut me off (and rightfully so) from further paying for my education. I was working a retail job and took some time off from school and studied for and passed my A+ and Network+ certs. I eventually got a job doing a PC refresh through my college and that kind of set my course for doing desktop support. It was never my intended career but it has paid the bills and the occasional class towards my degree. Ten years after that first refresh position and sometimes going many years without making any academic progress, I finally finished my degree. Meanwhile, my career still remains firmly in the desktop support realm and I'm having trouble breaking into something else.
    At this point, I'm ready to move on from desktop, server, networking, security, etc. into something like Business Analysis. I plan to take IIBA's Entry Certificate in Business Analysis on December 15 to further delineate my resume. It's similar to PMI's CAPM in that it doesn't require any documented work hours. I'd also like to study and beef up on some skills like Excel and SQL.
    Can anyone recommend ways to get unpigeonholed? I may just need some work on my non-desktop support resume.
    Thank you for any and all suggestions!
     
    JK2447 likes this.
  2. JK2447
    Highly Decorated Member Award 500 Likes Award

    JK2447 Petabyte Poster Administrator

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    Hi Red, thank you for asking here. You've had quite a journey already haven't you. It is hard for all of us to not get pidgeonholed to be honest, especially if you're good at what you do. What I would say is that it's not all about qualifications. Do you feel your degree has changed anything? I don't about mine. I did it for me but the career I have I forged. I also went for specific industry certs like VCP's and MCSEs as that was the area for me and still is.

    Do you know why you want to go into Business Analysis mate? I know a few who went that way, one or two who went straight into it. No IT knowledge. Excuse the questions, I just want to chew it over with you. One thing that I know for sure is that if you want it badly enough, you'll do what is needed and you will get the position that you want. Positive mental attitude and all of that

    Thanks
    James
     
    Certifications: VCP4, VCP5, VCP6, VCP6.5, VMConAWS Skill, BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VSP, VTSP
    WIP: VCAP 6.5 DCV (Design)
  3. redfoot12

    redfoot12 New Member

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    To answer your question, I've been really disappointed that my bachelor's really hasn't changed my job prospects too much. It's pretty irrelevant in desktop support but

    The core tasks of BA work just appeal to me-- working with stakeholders to elicit requirements and then analyzing and documenting those requirements.
    After I take the ECBA (and pass!), I think I'm going to move on and study for the Microsoft Excel exams.
     
  4. JK2447
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    JK2447 Petabyte Poster Administrator

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    I used to be a Solution Architect and what you've described is what I did, in IT infrastructure terms.

    It's just my opinion but a degree when working in IT is of limited use in my opinion. I feel I can say that as I studied part time for five years for mine. I also think that you did a great job getting this and it shows you are of a certain level of intelligence and determination. Mine may be why I'm where I am today. It's impossible to say.

    Mastering excel is a great thing in any role. I've had to use it across most of my jobs.

    Are there BA jobs where you work now and can you ask to ask to do a secondment? Try before you buy.

    Have you considered becoming an IT architect? They do some of what youve listed and you can use the knowledge you already have
     
    Certifications: VCP4, VCP5, VCP6, VCP6.5, VMConAWS Skill, BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VSP, VTSP
    WIP: VCAP 6.5 DCV (Design)
  5. redfoot12

    redfoot12 New Member

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    Every now and then I'll see "Junior BA" or "Entry Level BA" postings and I'll usually apply unless there's something specific in the description that I see as disqualifying.
    I haven't really looked at the IT Architect role but it's definitely something to keep in mind.
     
  6. nisseki

    nisseki Byte Poster

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    Have you asked for any informal training at your current employer? Build rapport with the other technical teams?
     
  7. redfoot12

    redfoot12 New Member

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    Part of my issue with desktop support is that it extremely difficult to find positions with the actual company you would be supporting. I've gone through a revolving door of tech staffing and contracting companies. I'm currently a temporary contractor who may eventually be brought on full-time, but we'll see.
     

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