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xp network printing

Discussion in 'Windows Vista / 7 / 8 Client Exams' started by salv236, Sep 4, 2010.

  1. salv236

    salv236 Nibble Poster

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    I have a question concerning the setting up of network printers within XP.

    say i have a network printer that has an integrated NIC, i want to setup xp as a print server.
    How do you proceed, the cocnern is if i go to a machine you need to establish what would be the ip address of that printer.

    If you were in a domain environment you could obtain the ip from the DHCP.

    Thanks for any assistance.
     
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  2. GSteer

    GSteer Megabyte Poster

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    Not quite sure which stage you're asking for help here with Salv.

    1) Are you asking how do you find the IP address of the printer

    or

    2) How do you setup XP to access a printer on a known IP and then share it ?
     
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  3. salv236

    salv236 Nibble Poster

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    obtaining the ip of a printer connected to a NIC port in xp within a workgroup
     
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  4. DC Pr0Mo

    DC Pr0Mo Kilobyte Poster

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    Some printers have a LCD screen to view and change network settings for a printer, if that is not the case then there is normally a button or combination of buttons that you would press(Hold down) on the printer which will print out amongst other stuff it’s network settings, if it is on a different subnet than the rest of your network you would change a machine on your network to the same settings as the printer, type the printers IP address into your browser, and change its IP settings to suit your network from there.
     
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  5. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    I wouldn't recommend using DHCP for printers, they need to have static addresses or you have to reconfigure the port every time the DHCP server gives it a new address.
    If I had a pound for every time....
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2010
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  6. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    We use static IP's for printers which are on a different subnet...

    you could also setup reservations on the DHCP server for your printers.

    Edit: To be more specific, if you are going to use the the same IP scheme on your printers as you have on your computers make sure you setup a DHCP reservation on your DHCP server so that the server won't issue any IP addresses you use for your printers. Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2010
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  7. GSteer

    GSteer Megabyte Poster

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    As the others have said:

    Locate the manual for the model of printer you've got, there'll be a button combo / menu option to print out it's current settings if it isn't already configured on a PC

    If it's an existing one that your trying to find the IP of and not a new one that you're trying to configure then do a properties on the printer on the PC that can print to it and go to the ports tab, the IP shoud be listed in the formatt IP_xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx there.

    And if you are running a DHCP server/service were you can set reservations then you can do that for it, otherwise make sure you assign a static IP to it that is on the same subnet as your network but outside of the DHCP range you have set for your hosts.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2010
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