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Worth A+ certification ????

Discussion in 'A+' started by ch1326, Jan 2, 2009.

  1. ch1326

    ch1326 New Member

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    Hi, All

    I have graduated Bachelor of IT.

    just wonder whether having A+ certification is worth for me or not ? If not, What certification should I pursue ???

    Cheers
     
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Hi and welcome to CF!

    Whether A+, or any other cert, would be useful will depend on what you want to do in the way of employment. In some places the degree will be worth more, in others it will be worth less.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Hi,

    If you're going into support, then I believe that it will be a benefit for you to have the A+. Even though the A+ is lower than the degree, it does cover things that the degree does.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  4. ch1326

    ch1326 New Member

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    which means if I already have a Degree of IT, it is not necessay to pursue on A+ ?
     
  5. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Depends. What area of IT are you proposing to go into?

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  6. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I actually learned things by doing the A+ that I didn't learn in my HND, and HND isn't that far of degree level. More qualifications/certification can't hurt you as long as they are within your experience level.

    SO A+, N+ and MCDST would be fine but with no experience you shouldn't go for any higher certs.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  7. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Like hbroomhall said:

    To my knowledge there are no professional certifications that are higher than a degree. A degree shows that you have attained a certain level of (theory) knowledge. Professional certs (regardless of if they are vendor neutral like the A+ or vendor specific like MS certs) show that you have knowledge specific to that technology/range of technology.

    In my opinion, you can't go wrong with a combination of academic, professional & vocational qualifications.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  8. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    As Harry and Ken mentioned above "It Depends".
    If a degree shows employers the knowledge you've learned and your discipline to the profession; the A+ (and other technology certs) will show you know the details of the specific technology.
     
  9. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    Having a degree in IT is very advantageous but on the other hand if you want to start working in IT doing 1st line helpdesk support or desktop support then the A+ is worth obtaining.

    Also bear in mind that whilst studying to obtain the A+ certification you'd learn a lot about computer hardware, operating systems and basic networking. Best wishes:)
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
    WIP: MCTS:70-236, PowerShell
  10. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Its depends on what you covered in your degree and your previous experience, and whether you want to apply for positions that request A+ certification, or wish to certify for your own reasons.

    Not if you already know it, the only difference is you will become certified in it.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  11. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    And what is the point of becoming certified if it does not teach you something? Please, this is a forum for sharing information and helping as much as it's possible, remember that, thank you.
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
    WIP: MCTS:70-236, PowerShell
  12. keane14

    keane14 Bit Poster

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    Hi,

    I dont think you can have too many strings to your bow!

    cheers.
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+ 2009 Edition
    WIP: Network +
  13. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Thats my point exactly, I wouldn't in general advise certification if you personally will learn very little and your potential future employers are unlikely to request it.

    Of course this is my opinion, many seem to reccomend to certify purely on existing knowledge and experience and not to use it as a learning aid at all, I personally disagree with this.

    I see very little reason to put in the required study to certify unless there is at least a partial learning process or you require it to land work.

    It does not always help to spend too long studying the same material, there needs to be constant gradual progression. A gentle learning curve, change and exposure to new things. This is how people develop and grow.
    If someone has already covered 90% of the A+ then studying it for the remaining 10% may well be a wasted effort and demotivating. I would instead urge them to look elsewhere and explain to employers why they chose to study other material.

    We seem to forget that people can learn things without certification, in fact often the best ways to learn things involves, practical hands on, play, use of all senses, a motivating factor like direct application, seeing the results of your efforts in a real world context, etc. Why not just study the bits that interest you until certification becomes relevant, if at all ?

    Ironically there is a constant debate in the UK on how bad testing and metrics are damaging everything from young childrens education to healthcare, testing and measuring is not always good or harmless.

    I have read 15+ non cert related computer books for every one certification book (and I've read a lot of cert books...), how many can say the same ?

    I totally agree with the sentiment, however ones life is finite so you should choose which strings to add carefully...

    What career do you wish to pursue ? Do you see the A+ assisting with gaining knowledge or with your career ? What interests you most ?

    Happy new year everybody ! Best of luck whatever you decide. :D
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  14. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    However I would also like to point out that for someone starting out (the first 2 posts of ch1326 kind of implies it) and regardless of having a degree or not, the A+ is still a good place to start (provided that person is going into the support side of IT).

    The A+ can be used in conjunction with the Network+ as an elective for the MCSA, by passing the A+ (or any Comptia cert) you can then join the Comptia IT Pro association, use the A+ for the rollover to the CST and membership into the ETA-i, as solid evidence for your CPD, etc...

    While it may just be a certification in itself, it's what each cert can be turned into to help develop your career.

    Here we tend to advise certification mainly because this is mainly a certification forum and not because we forget that we can learn things without them.

    While I can't say that I've read over 15 books in IT/Computing without the end product being a cert, I can say that as a martial artist I have read over 15 books in the martial arts not because I was going to be tested in other styles, but for interest & knowledge (I use to be an instructor).

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  15. Evilwheato

    Evilwheato Kilobyte Poster

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    I have a degree myself (not in IT but a 1st class nevertheless) and had no doubt that I would be "starting" with certifications. I saw the A+ as a good starting position for myself even though I knew I would pass it (I must admit I did learn bits though) . It shows employers a certain level of dedication to IT (might not be in your case due to your IT degree) plus a motivation to continue learning (especially if it's self study).
    If you feel you can pass it, the ~£250 isn't a huge amount to loose for a decent entry level certification. At the very least it allows you to branch out, as Ken said above.
     

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