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Wireless Broadband

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Rob1234, Apr 3, 2009.

  1. Rob1234

    Rob1234 Megabyte Poster

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    I have Sky wireless broadband but the wireless range does not reach into my bedroom :( so I have been looking for something cheap that would allow me to get broadband in my room and I came across this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Max-Value-Mbps-Home-Double/dp/B000TV7FJ4/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top has anyone used them before? are they any good?

    Or does anyone know any alternative methods to get broadband in my bedroom?
     
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  2. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    I have used them, for them to work reliably they ideally should be on the same ring. For the most common domestic situations they should be fine, probably cheapest way to find out is just buy some and see.

    Its basically Power Over Ethernet, this sort of technology was previously developed for industrial applications, basic networking for factories and warehouses.

    See here :-
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HomePlug_Powerline_Alliance
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_line_communication
     
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  3. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Actually, Power over Ethernet (PoE) is a way to transfer power to devices over Ethernet lines, not the other way around (transferring data over power lines). What you are describing is called Power-Line Ethernet or Power-Line Communication (PLC) (as your last link correctly describes).

    Although I've used PoE quite a bit (which works great to get power to remote networked devices), I've never used PLC, so I don't know how well it works.
     
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  4. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    It's not been approved for use in Australia, so i havent come across it. However, i have read Harry's comments on here a few times and from memory, it apparently works really well.
     
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  5. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    For the record it did not work for me, so its not for everyone.

    My two rooms were on different phases, I got an electrician to change both rooms to be off the same phase, but they were still off different rings, reception then went up to something from nothing but was still really low, my connection if I could establish one, almost immediately dropped out, if I could connect at all which mostly I could not. While I had a connection the transmission rate really low, something like 200 baud.

    In rooms on the same ring the technology works perfectly as advertised, there is an initial small delay if you turn the devices off, otherwise it acts pretty much like a wired connection, probably because if you have quality mains wiring, thats pretty much what it is !

    So in reality it entirely depends on your application, they are a good solution if your house wiring supports it.

    BosonMichael was correct in pointing out that I confused two similar but different technologies. I meant PLC not Power Over Ethernet.
     
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  6. UKDarkstar
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    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    I've used these for customers in the past from Linksys - seemed to work ok and solve the problem.
     
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  7. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    You can also get these :-

    http://www.solwise.co.uk/net-powerline-pl-85pew.htm

    Homeplug wireless extenders. (Of course there are many other brands available too !)

    I think you could also set up similar stuff by using a wifi/switch as an access point and connecting it to a standard homeplug I think.
     
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  8. rax

    rax Megabyte Poster

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    What about trying a Wireless N router?
     
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  9. Rob1234

    Rob1234 Megabyte Poster

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    I have no idea about the wiring in my flat, it is quite a new apartment I'm not sure if that makes a difference, I think I will buy them and see what happens can always send them back I guess.
     
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  10. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Basically as I understand it you are introducing a small amount of interferance into your mains supply, this is the data you are transmitting. The further the signal has to go and the lower quality the connection the less likely it is to work.

    If your building is multiphase, which is rare for residential property, then each phase is a totally seperate supply, there is no connection at all between the sockets on seprate phases.

    If the two rooms are on different rings then the signal has to make if through the fusebox, I'm no electrical whizz but its possible the signal could get blocked here by all sorts of stuff, circuit breakers etc ? The devices also should be run straight off of sockets idealy and not off extension leads, certainly not ones with surge protectors, UPS etc.

    It is also possible for your mains to be 'dirty' I'm told, if only my gf was so obliging ! :D
     
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