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Windoze 2000 Server - Remote Installation Server (Service?)

Discussion in 'Windows Server 2003 / 2008 / 2012 Exams' started by Cartman, Oct 27, 2003.

  1. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Hi - this is in relation to 70-215 Win2K for anyone who don't know ;-)

    Reading up about RIS, I would dearly like to see this in practice. I have two PC's netted together one running Server and the other running Professional.

    I can set up the RIS server OK on the Server and authorize in DHCP etc etc, but I would like to get the other machine to install from RIS. Trouble is the Professional machine is neither PXE compatible or has a NIC that is on Microsofts approved list so the RBFG.exe is out too. Does anyone out there have any idea how I could get around this or is it impossible without the appropriate NIC?

    Cheers for any info from you learned guys... :P
     
  2. AndyL

    AndyL Nibble Poster

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    I don't think there's a way to make it boot unless you can use PXE or RBFG but could you not just get hold of a PXE card for a few quid?
     
    Certifications: MCSE 2000,2K3,MCSA:M 2000, MCSA 2K3
    WIP: Painting the doorframes.
  3. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    I could.......spose that would be too easy! Oh well, just curious to know if it could be done. Best go shopping for one of those PXE thingys.... :eek:
     
  4. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Not that I'm any expert (as I usually begin my replies), but I would suggest that, given the lack of enthusiasm with which M$'s whole RIS/PXE thing was greeted with, I would reckon it's no great loss if you can't actually re-create it in your own lab.

    I found it much more useful to learn how to create a network boot floppy and do a standard install across the network from a Share.

    The 215 only questions you on the vaguest theory of RIS - kind of "So do you know what RIS is ?"

    I wouldn't worry unduly, Cartman - just make sure you know what that Chapter is about.

    HTH
     
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  5. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Like the first line of your post - I always try to do it too, it's a great disclaimer!!

    I must confess whilst reading about this sometime ago, it did occur to me that RIS was somewhat overkill in that here was YET another way to install Windoze.

    How many ways do you need? CD, floppies, over the network, Sysprep and Setup manager.??

    Seeing as you put it like that, can't help but agree - over the network is probably the best way, long as you either 1) Had an existing OS that could connect to it, or 2) Create a net boot floppy.
     
  6. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Not a task I found particularly easy in itself, but one that gives you that real buzz when you finally nail it ! :cheers

    Or maybe that's just me ...
     
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  7. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Just outta interest what OS did you use to get a boot floppy?
     
  8. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    I was wiping an old W98 Laptop with no CD-ROM, and placed the Install files on a share on a W2k Pro machine.

    I did tinker with writing my own files to create the floppy, but as the PCMCIA NIC manufacturers were kind enough to provide a downloadable boot disk client, I used that, and <VIOLA> - Network Install

    Prob not practical in the workplace scenario, but beats PXE in the meantime :P
     
    Certifications: MCP, A+, Network+
    WIP: Clarity
  9. Cartman

    Cartman Byte Poster

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    Oh, OK. Sounds OK to me, if it boots the machine and connects using a NET USE then it will do the job. I was thinking about having a go at that, using win98 boot up files on the floppy - remember the sys c: a: command that heralded from the DOS days? Nice and simple...*grinz*
     

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