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Why can i never ping any end device that sits after a router in packet tracer?

Discussion in 'General Cisco Certifications' started by zr79, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    So i have look at all the reference topologies in packet tracer and a few others i have downloaded, now say i have this,

    router ------------> PC3
    |
    |
    switch --------- router ----------PC4
    /\
    / \
    / \
    PC1 PC2


    or so. Basically having a router between PCs now PC1 can ping PC2 but i can't ping PC3 or PC4 from PC1 or PC2 or ping PC3 from PC4 and ovbioulsy PC4 from PC3 etc...

    These are all pre-configured topologies for packet tracer so why can i not ping from PC to PC through a router?
     
    Certifications: A+
  2. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Have you set up IP addressing correctly?
    Do you have any routes set up?
    Are you using the right cables for your setup (straight-through, crossover etc)?
    If you have serial interfaces connecting routers have you configured clock speeds?

    In short - are you trying to run before you can walk? Sticking routers together and getting them to 'work' isn't like building a lego set - you need to understand what you're trying to achieve, and how to go about achieving it first. Perhaps you should read through the Cisco Curriculum that you purchased as part of the package that gave you access to packet tracer?
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  3. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    The cables are all correct, i undertsand you need to set up ip addressing and i am not 100% clear on it maybe only 40% clear atm(but remember these are not my topologies these are the ones that come with PT), would anyone be good enough to make me the above topology that has all the correct ip addressing in PT and upload it for me.....
     
    Certifications: A+
  4. ThomasMc

    ThomasMc Gigabyte Poster

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    Never mind me, Long day at work.
     
    Certifications: MCDST|FtOCC
    WIP: MCSA(70-270|70-290|70-291)
  5. brind1972

    brind1972 New Member

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    Want to attach your Packet Tracer lab to have a look at?
     
  6. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    if you could yeah..

    Just 2 pcs, one pc going through a switch then that switch through a router then another switch on the other side of the router then a pc at the end of that second switch so that i can ping pc2 from pc1.
     
    Certifications: A+
  7. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    Here you go budy.
    Please make good use of it and do use google more often as everything is there.
    Hope you can understand the topology and what needs to be done to make it work.
    Whenever you get a router in between two networks you then must use a routting protocol, either rip, ospf, igrp, eigrp, etc...
    If you want please send me the one you have and I'll have a look at it.
    Take care,
    Albert, C
     

    Attached Files:

    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: 220-701 - A+
  8. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Don't diss the static route man. We don't run ANY routing protocol internally on our network - and we're a global company. Everything internally is handled by static routes. Externally its a different matter, but you'll find plenty of SMEs out there who only use static routes (depsite what Cisco tells you!)
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  9. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    Thanks for that exactly what i was looking for. Now,

    The PCs Gateway ip address = routers Fastethernet 0/0 or 0/1 ip address depending on the side of the your connecting too etc... Ok i got that.


    What is the significance of the .254 in the gateway address you have is this a special number?


    So if i added more than one PC onto either switch they would all have the same gateway address(this is pretty obvious and i shouldn't even be asking but just double checking)...?


    As for the RIP addresses i haven't come onto that at all, i have heard of rip but i didn't know you had to add them like that to the router. I see there is also the option for static routing address here, are rip and static the only 2 options?? Even though i don't undertsand this part of routing yet, am looking into it.
     
    Certifications: A+
  10. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Agreed. I used floating static routes at my last company... though we had only 8 sites to manage.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    No mate not at all, my mistake as I didn't even thought about it to be honest.
    It is a learning process and here it is yet another thing I have learnt, we are always learning.
    My bad.
    Thanks for the comments guys, 10 out of 10.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: 220-701 - A+
  12. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    The .254 is simply the IP address I have given to the routers Fastethernet Interface and that is the default-gateway for the network but it can be anything you choose.

    Yes there is also static routing as mentioned here before by zebulebu and that would be something like router(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 (interface where traffic is to exit the network or next hop's IP address).
    The 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 would be for all networks, you could be more specific and mentioned just the network to be routed out like the one example I given you #ip route 192.168.28.0 0.0.0.255 Fa1/0.
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: 220-701 - A+
  13. albertc30

    albertc30 Kilobyte Poster

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    Guys, I just made some modifications to my PT file.
    I removed the RIP protocol so that I could try the static routing but I then noticed that I can still communicate between networks.
    Is this because they are directly connected to the router that this happens?
    As I said before we are always learning....:oops:
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: 220-701 - A+
  14. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    zr79,

    Questions:
    1. Which CCNA curriculum is this packet tracer activity from?
    2. Which CCNA course is this packet tracer activity from?
    3. What is the packet tracer activity number for this packet tracer activity?
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
    WIP: CCDA

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