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which jobs will I qualify for

Discussion in 'General Cisco Certifications' started by kareem1000, May 12, 2008.

  1. kareem1000

    kareem1000 New Member

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    Hi,

    I am currently studying on a cisco CCNA course.

    My question is after completion of this course, which jobs will I be qualified for. Which jobs would I reasonable be able to undertake.

    I do realise that currently in networking there is a supply and demand imbalance. I realise the jobs that you list, I may not actually get.

    When you reply could you give me a job specification ( i.e duties/taks performed for each job ). I like to get a true understanding and of what each job entails.

    Regards,
    Kareem.
     
  2. Robroy

    Robroy Bit Poster

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    Good question, I want to know the same, because I'm studying for ccna.
     
  3. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Certifications don't magically qualify you for jobs... experience qualifies you for jobs. So the answer is: it depends on how much experience you have. If you have real-world business IT experience administering Cisco routers, the CCNA will help you get network administraiton jobs. If you have no experience, then the CCNA won't do you any good in finding a job - and can actually make it MORE difficult for you to get the only job that a tech without experience is qualified to get: an entry-level job (help desk tech, field service tech, level 1 tech, front line tech, PC repair tech).
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  4. Crito

    Crito Banned

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    search job boards like http://www.computerjobs.com

    EDIT: entry level positions are usually something like server operator or NOC technician and, like BM said, with experience you'll qualify for administrator and engineer.
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: none
  5. Suttar

    Suttar Byte Poster

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    At the moment assuming you have no experience the best thing you can do is apply for an entry level position, such as a helpdesk role. From there you can work your way to a role where you have access to some cisco Kit.

    Once you have gotten experience with Cisco Kit it will be a different matter and you can go for Network Engineer, and Network Admin positions as the previous Guys stated. There are a few Trainee Networking positions out there but they are very very scarce.
     
    Certifications: Hnc Comp & Bsc Networking, ITIL v3
    WIP: CCNA
  6. kareem1000

    kareem1000 New Member

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    Hi,

    Thanks for your reply bosonmichael, but I'm just wondering why a CCNA qualification would make it more difficult to get a entry level position ?

    Regards,
    Kareem
     
  7. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    It's because the CCNA is regarded by employers as being a certification to prove someone has a good amount of experience managing and maintaining cisco hubs and swtiches. (and by a good amount of experience I mean atleast a year)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  8. kareem1000

    kareem1000 New Member

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    Hi,

    The people who have replied to my question seemed to have missed the real point of my question.

    What I'm really trying to ask is that there must be jobs that sit in between the entry level positions and the network administrator position. So in effect If I start of with an entry level positon ( because I have no real world networking experience ), which job would I aspire/work towards next, and which job which I aspire to after that, and so on. Basically I am trying to plot a career map and what to basically know all the ladder rungs that I would have to climb.

    Regards,
    Kareem.
     
  9. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    it could be anything, you first job could be to support windows and having to pass on networking issues to higher level techs, then you could progress to their level and so on and so on.

    or

    you could do IT support for a small company where you get lots of training and do a bit of everything.

    Really though when you have had a good amount of experience in support you could apply for anything your skillset allows, only you know if you could apply for a network admins job and do it.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  10. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    GBL is right.

    If I'm hiring someone for an entry-level job, I don't want to hire someone with a CCNA. Seeing the CCNA on a resume or CV will cause an employer to think one or more of the following:
    1) Without experience, they are more likely to have used braindumps to cheat their way to the CCNA certification.
    1) They are more likely to be too expensive for me to hire due to the advanced certification.
    2) They are more likely to leave at the first opportunity of something better, since this job doesn't relate to the CCNA... and then I'll have to find, hire, and train someone all over again.

    Thus, it won't be worth the risk to me, as an employer, to try to hire them. The certification is simply not relevant to what an entry-level tech will be doing. So the certification becomes a hindrance, not a help, until you gain the relevant experience.

    It's like hiring someone with a Bachelors degree or a Masters degree to work at McDonalds. They're not likely to be happy making burgers for low wages. Understand what I'm saying? :)

    The general path that most people take is entry-level tech > desktop support tech > server/systems admin > network admin. Techs who want to get into SQL and Exchange generally get server admin experience and then specialize in those areas. Techs who want to specialize in security generally get network admin experience and then specialize in security.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    Put simply employers want real world experience and examples of achievements in the work world, certifications are meant to be to prove that experience and the knowledge, and maybe indicate that you are ready to move a step up in your career.

    You need to be on the first step though first (or get lucky).
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  12. CheeseOnToast

    CheeseOnToast Nibble Poster

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    I disagree (as usual)

    A little bit of real experience added with a CCNA will take you a long way - with a bit of luck!

    In my place they are currently taking on 1st/2nd line comms NOC helpdesk support - paying 25-29K

    If you had a bit of IT experience, even helpdesk, you would get an interview.. and if you were good/suitable, the role.

    I know because I got the same job, and haven't even got my CCNA yet! On the premise that I am in the academy, and studying.

    It all depends on the employer mate.

    Just hope for a bit of luck and get as much experience in as you can.

    But yeah, as said, the CCNA alone won't just open doors, but IMO, it will help.
     
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation
    WIP: CCNA
  13. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    A lot of useful and helpful feedbacks posted already, but I'd also like to add that with a bit of hard work and determination you can get a foot in the door.

    Start looking for 1st line helpdesk support roles and keep on studying for your CCNA if that's the route you want to go. Best wishes and please, do not limit yourself:)
     
    Certifications: MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003 Messaging, MCP, HNC BIT, ITIL Fdn V3, SDI Fdn, VCP 4 & VCP 5
    WIP: MCTS:70-236, PowerShell

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