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What OS to Run on a Small Business Server?

Discussion in 'Networks' started by Xinapse, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. Xinapse

    Xinapse Bit Poster

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    Im helping to setup and find the best server for my dads small business of 5-10 users. The functions will be primarily to store all the files and user accounts on the server and adding print devices.

    We have identified the HP Proliant Microserver with a few custom upgrades to be a good choice at around £400, however the Windows Server 2008 license seem to be over £500, is this right, as it is a lot of money just for a small business, or is there a cheaper/free version of it?
    A unix OS could be an option as i use linux myself, but my dad would have no clue on how to use it so Windows is a preferred option.

    Also im confused as to what the Client Access licenses are, do you need to buy one of these for every computer you wish to connect to it?
     
  2. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    SBS 2008 is your best bet mate. Spec it when you buy the server so you can get it at OEM price.
     
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  3. adsl_alc_20190.bin

    adsl_alc_20190.bin Bit Poster

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    what he said ^^^^

    But

    Another option would be sbs 2003, not as easy to use as sbs 2008 to use as a novice, but cheaper. I believe you buy the license in clumps of 5, so unless your company goes over 5 users you will not need to purchase another.
     
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  4. GSteer

    GSteer Megabyte Poster

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    SBS2008 oem is what you want.

    I recall that there used to be HP specific oem versions that were even cheaper than the normal ones.

    Regarding CALs the oem will come with 5 included and you'll need to purchase an additional CAL pack which will have another 5.

    EDIT: just remembered that SBS2011 Standard is now available to order, at least here in Canada, the Essentials version includes 25 CALs but does not include a local Exchange install, it relies on hosted Exchange, and isn't available just yet. But as you haven't mentioned a requirement for that it might be worth looking into.

    FAQ PDF for the new SBS2011 family: http://oem.microsoft.com/public/worldwide/sbs_2011/sbs_2011_family_frequently_asked_questions.pdf
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2011
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  5. Shinigami

    Shinigami Megabyte Poster

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    It's not that cheap, that's true, but you get more than just a server OS with SBS. Now you may of course choose to not use the other components...
     
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  6. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Another vote for SBS :thumbleft
     
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  7. wagnerk
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    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    If it's just for that (eg no internal e-mail or no need for SQL, ISA/Forefront TMG, no more than 15 users) then I would say go for Windows 2008 r2 Foundation.

    You can get a HP microserver for £229 ex-VAT (then just buy another HDD for Raid 1, extra ram and some sort of backup system) and Windows 2008 r2 Foundation for £153 ex-VAT. See here. We bought one when they were offer £100 cash back.

    With Windows 2008 r2 Foundation, you do not need to purchase any CAL's unlike the other versions of Windows Server unless you will be using the more advanced features of 2008 r2 Foundation:

    See here.

    -Ken
     
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  8. GSteer

    GSteer Megabyte Poster

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    For reference there is an MS comparison PDF here for SBS 2011 and Server 2008 R2 Foundation:

    http://download.microsoft.com/downl...1_Essentials_vs_Windows_Foundation_Server.pdf

    As a side question - in the office that this is being setup for, are all of the client machines running XP Pro, Vista Business or 7 Pro? I'f you've got any home versions be aware that they won't join the domain and will need to authenticate manually to access the shares etc, or require upgrading.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2011
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  9. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    I do like the new lighter version of the MS Operating systems but if affordable I would still go for the standard version of SBS 2008 so you get Exchange server as well. If 10 users are connected to an external email server it can kill an ADSL connection (I’m guessing that’s what’s in place just now), especially first thing in the morning when everyone logs on and opens their Outlook clients.

    Also when sending large email attachments it will sit in the users outbox which again can cause confusion. At least if the server is handling the email it will sit in the SMTP connector there until the email is sent.
     
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