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What job to go for...

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by narey, Apr 29, 2008.

  1. narey

    narey New Member

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    Hi guys!

    When I have completed my A+ I hope to leave my current job as soon as possible but with my new qualification I'm not sure of what jobs to look out for, when I have completed the A+ and I get my feet on the first step of the IT ladder I'll be moving onto my Network+, basically like everyone I want to make cash fast, quick and easy but I just need a bit off guidance where to start my career.

    When I eventually complete both my courses, what other courses would be a smart choice to have that will raise you're earning potential?

    John Narey:rolleyes:
     
    WIP: CompTIA A+ & N+
  2. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Don't wait until you're done with the A+... start looking NOW. If you get your A+ before you find an entry-level tech job, add it to your CV and keep looking, while starting on the Network+.

    The only other certification I would recommend without first getting some real-world experience under your belt is the MCDST. And even then, some real-world experience would make getting that certification a *whole* lot easier.

    Start your career in any entry-level IT job... which are jobs that require no experience. These jobs include, but are not limited to, help desk, field service tech, Level 1 tech, PC repair tech, and some desktop support positions.

    Just about everyone starts at the bottom. Nobody says you have to stay there forever! Get your foot in the door, and start building some verifiable, real-world business IT experience. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  3. demarrer

    demarrer Byte Poster

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    cheer for that bosonmichael. :-) I was about to ask a similar question.

    Do you think then that the entry level jobs are much of a much, that the main aim could be to get one like a helpdesk role, build some real life experience, then start looking for something more .... or in your experience would it be better to try and get a more hands on job like being a pc technician instead of helpdesk ? how did you start off?

    Sorry for all the questions, not looking for any concrete answers - just a few suggestions really. !!

    H
     
    Certifications: A+, Security +, CCNA, CCSA
    WIP: music, (dreaming of) CCIE Security :D
  4. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    Depending on your situation (and where you want your career to go) an entry-level role is any role in IT. If you've got the background and experience to get into a technician role go for that (in my opinion) but if not, start in helpdesk and move your way up.
     
  5. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Any IT job is better than no IT job. Get what you can, then move to somewhere else when you can. It's certainly not good to be branded as a job hopper... but good techs will naturally progress quickly in their IT careers.

    I started out as a field service tech for a small company. We had a customer base who called us when they needed their PCs, printers, and occasionally, servers fixed. So I'd go from customer site to customer site handling "trouble tickets". Might be data migration from one computer to another... might be a failing PSU... might be loss of network connectivity... might be printing issues (hardware and/or software). I got a broad range of experience in a short period of time, which is an extremely good thing. My boss saw my aptitude, so when we had to tickets to service, he allowed me to administer the in-house Exchange server for approximately 40-50 users. Great experience for a tech just starting out.

    When I officially started in IT at age 28, I had a BS degree (in Chemistry, not IT), and had "messed around" with computers for 18 years (since I was 10). The 6 years prior to that, I was the unofficial "go-to" computer guy while working as an Operations Analyst for a telecommunications company. All of this "unofficial" experience (as well as the degree) made it easier for me to get hired as a field service tech; it set me ahead of my competition.

    So... my advice is this: get any IT job you can get. Hopefully, it's at a place where you can grow your skillset. If not, eventually start looking for a place where you can get those "nuggets of opportunity" like I had when I was a field service tech, getting a bit of server experience. A good company, a good work environment, and co-workers who are willing to help you develop will make gaining experience easier as you advance in your career. :)

    You're not being a bother at all - this is what IT forums are for! Ask MORE questions. We are here to help. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  6. demarrer

    demarrer Byte Poster

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    cheers for the advice, I feel even more encouraged now as I'm 28 too, got a degree in music and have always gravitated towards IT and yep have been that "go too" guy at work too.

    Just moved to france, changing career away from corporate sponsorship so pretty much biting the bullet and trying to get my foot in the door in the IT world- . Just passed A+ to certify what I know and also give my cv a little more edge. Currently looking at the N+ also 70-270 to get a deeper understanding of networking/XP and a taste for active directory. So hope this is a good approach too?? - as I'm aware of not wanting to get that sparkly certificate too soon without applying any of my IT knowledge in the job world.

    So cheers again for the perspective. I know what you mean about the danger of job hopping too much, will keep that in mind.
     
    Certifications: A+, Security +, CCNA, CCSA
    WIP: music, (dreaming of) CCIE Security :D

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