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What IT qualifications do you have other than certifications

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by rayox, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. rayox

    rayox Bit Poster

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    Hi everyone me again asking another question, I’m bit of a pain when it comes to asking questions I’m just interested in how many of use hold some sort of IT qualification apart from Certifications, I’m asking this as I’ve been told that certification are waste of time unless you’re already in the industry or have some sort of IT qualification, which has really got my hopes down as I was really wanting to get started on the CompTIA A+ certification but now I have second thoughts as I feel that without some sort of qualification in IT to back the certifications up it’s a bit pointless and a waste of money, the only qualification I have is a NVQ level two in storage and warehousing which is worth nothing how is someone like me meant to compete with someone with a degree and certifications I wouldn’t stand a chance, how many here have broke in to the IT industry with just certifications and does most IT mangers know the value of them and even what they even are and is that enough for him to say you’re capable of doing the job, I would really love to contribute to this forum more and end up one day being able to give out advice but this is hanging over me, I just want to know is it possible in this day and age without a degree.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2011
    Certifications: none
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  2. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    Certifications aren't meant as a way into the industry, they are meant to prove your ability further down the line.

    I got into IT 13 years ago with nothing, I had left school with no real qualifications (I left school at 16 and joined the Army straight away), years later I do have a lot of certifications but no 'qualifications' as such. Yes it's possible to start out from nothing but it usually means a long hard slog from the bottom.

    Don't be disheartened, stick to your guns and work hard and you will eventually get there.
     
    Certifications: CNA | CNE | CCNA | MCP | MCP+I | MCSE NT4 | MCSA 2003 | Security+ | MCSA:S 2003 | MCSE:S 2003 | MCTS:SCCM 2007 | MCTS:Win 7 | MCITP:EDA7 | MCITP:SA | MCITP:EA | MCTS:Hyper-V | VCP 4 | ITIL v3 Foundation | VCP 5 DCV | VCP 5 Cloud | VCP6 NV | VCP6 DCV | VCAP 5.5 DCA
    WIP: VCP6-CMA, VCAP-DCD and Linux + (and possibly VCIX-NV).
  3. rayox

    rayox Bit Poster

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    Cheers sinonD for the reply, I'll stick at it and get my A+ certification and see how it goes from there I suppose I'll never know if I dont give it a shot :)
     
    Certifications: none
    WIP: CompTIA A+
  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    I've been in IT for my whole career of approx 15 years, I would have stood little chance even back then of breaking in without a degree, sure some people do break into the industry without degrees all the time, but it's definitely a riskier route, if you plan to enter work and work your way up, I'd at least advise doing a part-time foundation degree at nightschool, then you've got your bases covered at least...

    To land your first position without any qual's you are going to have to be very lucky or very creative...

    While you're at it also learn all you can from other sources, become a critical thinker, read as many books as you can, do experiments, think aboiut things, its all part of the journey.

    Just watched 'Hackers Wanted', goes to show that a curious mind is half the battle...
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2011
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  5. paulwatson5

    paulwatson5 Byte Poster

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    potential longest sentance in the world???
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ (220-701 & 220-702)
    WIP: CompTIA Network +
  6. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  7. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    I got into IT without a degree but I did vocational training program in Microcomputers and Network support for 16 months straight. Then I was required to do a stage for 3 months. Throughout my career I did certifications as I gained the appropriate experience. However, I did my A+ while I was in school and I don't think that it's a hard requirement for you to have experience before pursuing this certification. In fact I was in your shoes and I did go for it, I even did the Network+ and 70-270 before I got my first job. I stopped there and only continued onto my MCDST and MCSA after I got more experience and promoted to a systems/network admin position.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2011
    Certifications: A+ | CCA | CCAA | Network+ | MCDST | MCSA | MCP (270, 271, 272, 290, 291) | MCTS (70-662, 70-663) | MCITP:EMA | VCA-DCV/Cloud/WM | VTSP | VCP5-DT | VCP5-DCV
    WIP: VCAP5-DCA/DCD | EMCCA
  8. Apexes

    Apexes Gigabyte Poster

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    I got into IT 6 years ago when i was 18 with absolutely nothing on my CV relating to IT work - i was a lucky duck.

    I had been messing about with computers since i was 12, building my own mahcines once i was 13, and learning from there. Although it's nothing like Corporate IT - which i'm in now, it was a small base to build my knowledge on. plus i was on £10k a year - but it was a starting point

    I have 1 cert lol - the Windows 7 - 70-680 exam. i really need to pull my finger out and get a few more done, as i know i'm capable of doing them with little studying due to my experience within the workplace.

    It is do'able - you don't need qualifications, but it obviously helps - if you can show a potential employer you have the drive, enthusiasm, and ability, and also willing to learn, and not demand £20k in your first job - some employers may prefer that over somebody who's just applying because they've done it before.

    We recruited a guy not so long back who had 2 months volunteer experience, no quals - over a guy who had an A+ with some experience, because he was an absolute ass and didn't seem to care, i've been training the young lad up for the last few months, and he's doing fantastic - he's in half hour early every day, stays late if he needs to - does everything he's asked, and he's making a solid starting point for the rest of his career in IT, and i make a point to show him new systems and procedures to help him further extend his knowledge

    It comes down to your approach to the job at the end of the day. Everywhere will be different depending on the job you're going for
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2011
    Certifications: 70-243 MCTS: ConfigMgr 2012 | MCSE: Private Cloud
  9. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    I don't think anyone can generalise about which way works and which way doesn't. Because of the wide variety of employers out there you will always have some who favour a formal education, some who favour experience, and some who favour certs.
    I think Apexes knocks the nail on the head when he says it's attitude that makes the difference. Certainly for entry-level IT support work I think a basic technical knowledge (basic certs or passing tech test at interview etc) is less important than customer handling skills and a persons desire to not only get the job, but be good at the job.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  10. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Agreed it depends on a lot of factors, so all we can do is give general advice, if you want to be a programmer as I see it you have basically two choices :-

    1. Be a self starter and really good at coding / problem solving and have examples of your work.
    2. Get a Computer Science / Maths / Engineering degree with a significant programming component.

    Customer service skills, basic tech skills, desire to do the job, all essential too, but they won't land you the job on their own.

    I expect support is a little easier to get into on average and there are more entry level positions.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2011
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  11. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    It was actually good GCSE's, A Levels and my attitude that got me my first IT job. Once I was in I worked hard and got where I wanted to be but thats not to say that even with certs, a degree and experience I haven't experienced some lows too. My current position has been a little bit if a nightmare but I worked hard again and start an IT job in 5 weeks that's more me I'm happy to say.
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  12. ade1982

    ade1982 Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    When we are talking first IT jobs though, are we talking sort of ICT support people on 17-23k or are we talking IT trainees on 13-15k? It all depends how realistic you are. I found it extremely difficult to judge where I am meant to fit in the IT market, when I left Uni with two Masters degrees. I had interviews for jobs where the average wage was around 25k, until I finally found one I liked (admittedly a stupid mistake now) around the 20k mark. I worked for a local medium sized company, the other people in my class went to work for IBM Sweden, GCHQ and Orange.

    When it says "experience of Active Directory", do they mean "knows how to reset a password" or "knows stuff that would make an MCSE's eyes bleed"?!

    Lets also get this straight: a University degree in Computer Science teaches you absolutely nothing about the real world!
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2011
  13. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    I disagree, a computer science degree isn't ideal if you do support work but it can be ideal if you are a developer as my degree covered Java, C and an old OO language called SmallTalk. I say isn't ideal because you do learn about threads and architecture from a Comp Sci degree, and you can still demonstrate you are a determined intelligent person by having a degree. A degree can also get you onto a companies grad scheme. I am very good friends with a few grads who have had opportunities that would take years to achieve otherwise; Getting placed straight on Networks for instance.

    I personally think doing a Masters before getting industry experience is going to skew your CV to be heavily academic over experience based. The exception again IMHO being if you'd done a Development related Masters which would be very handy (potentially).
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV

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