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What is there more of a need for?

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by cHk4, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Ok a few people think I am confused. I am now after speaking to some one last night.

    I know certificates will not defiantly get me a job but may help some. I am willing to put in the time to get them and stay updated this is not a problem.

    I like both programming and networking ( did half of a cisco course and was top in my class, really enjoyed it )

    Any way I was looking around for future prospects and there does not seem to be to many jobs around for programmers there seems to be more jobs for networkers etc.

    So now should I go with the MSCE and that route or go the programming route. Like I said I am willing to invest the time. Well it may now be much but will be putting in 20-40 hours a week studying.

    I just don’t want to spend money and then find out actually there are no jobs in that field so what’s the point? I know things change over time and what not.

    Thanks.
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  2. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Try some research on the net.

    I wouldn't reccomend anyone to become a programmer unless they have a real passion for it. The Market shouldn't be the deciding factor.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  3. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

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    There are jobs in every field in IT, you just need to be the person best for the job at the time, its not an industry where you can just have a good interview and get the job, your skills need to be as good if not better then someone elses as well.

    How come you only did half a Cisco course?
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  4. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Well I moved in with my dad after I left school and after hours my college ran a Cisco course. Due to my dads ill health I had to move back down with my mum therefor had to leave the course :(

    Thats the thing, when I was younger when I touched VB I loved programming. Something I really loved. So I do have the pssion for it I belive.

    You are right the market shouldn't be the deciding factor. But I dont want to spend a lot of time and effort learning a specific field and then there being no jobs about for that specific field.
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  5. nXPLOSi

    nXPLOSi Terabyte Poster

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    Its a shame about the Cisco course, sorry to hear about the reason you had to give it in. Its a hard question to answer really, as I said there are jobs for both out there, if your at the top of your game with having the skills etc... so I'd say go with your heart and passion, whichever one you feel that is.

    (Doesnt really help at all, but its comes down to you! :))
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA 2003 (270, 290, 291), MCTS (640, 642), MCSA 2008
    WIP: MCSA 2012
  6. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    My teacher was gutted because I was "so far ahead of the rest." Thanks for your advice it all does help :)
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  7. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    As others have already said, go into a field because you enjoy it... NOT because it's the next "hot thing". If you do something you enjoy, you will excel. If you do something that you don't enjoy, but are willing to do it for the money, you will be surpassed by those who have a true love for the job.

    Here in the States, there's a *huge* need for programmers. When I was out looking less than a couple of years ago, recruiters would constantly ask me if I knew of any programmers, even those starting out. Unfortunately (or fortunately), at the time, all my programmer friends were all gainfully employed. The jobs are out there, so if you enjoy programming, go for it.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  8. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  9. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    One of my apps uses sockets. took a bit to get my head around it. Though not as much as multithreading!

    I agree with everything said. take the one you love. you'll find jobs for it when you are ready.
     
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation; MCTS: Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010, Administration
    WIP: None at present
  10. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    cHK4: what have you programmed in the passed? How many personal projects have you completed of those that you started?
     
    Certifications: BSc(Hons) Comp Sci, BCS Award of Merit
    WIP: Not doing certs. Computer geek.
  11. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    I agree with what has been said here, I am really good at Oracle and Sql but I dont particularly enjoy it. When I first joined this from I was thinking "well should I become a DBA" and the advice I got from the people on here was the same as what youre getting go for a career that you will enjoy not one that you can but hate.

    And after realising it all I want to be working in a roll were I can sort out pc problems and networking problems, installations etc

    So thats why I'm going for the A+ then possibly N+ whilst still looking for my first IT roll
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  12. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Like I said was when I was a lot younger! Just silly things like a web browser ( basic ) and like a notepad type program! A few other little bits and pieces. I completed every thing I started. Like I said maybe was 13,14 so was many years ago :P ( was before .net )
    ---

    Also from what I remember a few functions didnt work on the web browser. Well most of them :P

    Thanks again trip :) I used to do win socket stuff in mIRC ( I know in the real world it would be tad harder than mIRC! lol )

    Thanks Boson,Fergal and Green too ^_^
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  13. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    To be brutally honest, as it stands this does not indicate to me that you have a passion for programming, because:

    1. You have written basic applications.
    2. A lot of those applications you did not see through to completion.
    3. You are yet to code something substantial.
    4. You can't claim to really be familiar with a language or dev environment until you have undertaken something substantial.
    5. EIGHT YEARS have elapsed since you took it seriously.

    Books and web resources teach you stuff to get you started. It is up to you to take it further before you know enough to decide if you really like it and make a career out of it.
     
    Certifications: BSc(Hons) Comp Sci, BCS Award of Merit
    WIP: Not doing certs. Computer geek.
  14. cHk4

    cHk4 Nibble Poster

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    Yep I have only written basic applications :(. All bar the few bugs in the explorer I saw through to the end. Nope I have not coded any thing substantial :(
    I hope I didn’t come across as claiming to be familiar with a language or a dev environment, because I am not I just touched basics :(.
    8 years is a long time, I’m not making excuses for my past but a lot has happened in my life which hindered me from doing things ( whether it was my own choice or if circumstances ). This is not making excuses.
    Thank you for your post it does contain very valid points. - just saw your signature and saw your a programmer :P ^_^
     
    Certifications: None
    WIP: MCTS
  15. Crito

    Crito Banned

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    Programming work is the easiest to outsource. You don't have to physically be somewhere to do it. So even if you have Mozart-level skills you'll probably end up in a pauper's grave. Why make arseholes rich along the way? :blink
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: none
  16. Sayed

    Sayed Bit Poster

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    Well according to my information (plus info from a mate in IT recruitment consultancy) the demand for networking / programming is an equal split at the mo ... but there is a noticable increase in demand for programmers having .Net skills with C# / vb

    I think the first thing you need to do is consider where your passion lies and then work towards getting a career ... dont pick a job for the sake of it being in demand because if you dont enjoy what your doing then your progression rate will not be so great...

    The problem with the IT market in general is that a lot of firms look for some experience but theres a lot of people without experience like yourself ... and thus a huge gap is created...

    The challenge is for you to get your foot in the door in a company doing something you want to do....
     
  17. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Well I can't speak for everyone but heres my thoughts.

    There was alot of demand generated for both programmers and Network engineers as a result of the internet boom. Many of the programming jobs created are fairly non technical (in programming terms) and may disappear as corporate web sites stabalise and if CMS/Portal products ever deliver.

    A programming career is not for the faint hearted, there are lots of reasons for this, you will have to be highly proficient to progress above the average fairly menial jobs, its very difficult to justify high pay levels to pointy haired bosses who see you as a 'resource', jobs are outsourced and sent off shore, the industry is highly cyclic, the career path progression is not straightforward, you will have to work on deathmarch projects and eat pizza at 11:00pm at work !

    This is the reality of much of modern development, in reality its still very much managed as cottage industry in alot of places. Read the countless articles and books written on surviving as a programmer.

    Career progression is difficult because its hard to justify a pay rise from your boss all the time you are still programming. People tend to get pushed into middle management jobs. Jobs like IT director or CIO nearly always go to people with an IS background. Also look on any company board, you will see accountants and business types but rarely engineers and even rarer still programmers.

    Theres also numerous other factors I could mention but I'd better not !

    So thats why you better have passion and really want to do it !
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  18. Mathematix

    Mathematix Megabyte Poster

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    I hope this means that your eight-year drought will be coming to an end in trying your hand at proper programming? :)
     
    Certifications: BSc(Hons) Comp Sci, BCS Award of Merit
    WIP: Not doing certs. Computer geek.
  19. Bambino1506

    Bambino1506 Megabyte Poster

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    QFT good post.
     
    Certifications: MCP,MCDST,MCSA
    WIP: CCA

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