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What does a potential IT Recruiter really think of ECDL on a CV

Discussion in 'General Microsoft Certifications' started by ickle97116084, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. ickle97116084

    ickle97116084 Bit Poster

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    Hi guys a little background first. I work in the scientific industry installing apps and troubleshooting software faults. I also configure and administer scientific software. My job title is 'Systems Analyst' however I dont really feel I do a 'Systems Analysts' role. I have a scientific degree (Honours), a project management certification and Network+. As I am being made redundant in 3 months I wanted to begin my transfer into a true IT role but as part of my redundancy package my work are giving me all the material towards learning and sitting the ECDL exams.

    My question is will having ECDL on my CV this late in my career be looked at with humour i.e. is it condidered a joke in the industry or will it be seen as working toward something while transferring to a new job. I have tried to come up with an answer to the dreaded question why did I choose to sit this set of exams and I will reply with: 'Having proof that I can both use and relate to the the software my customers I will be supporting!'

    I have no qualms that i wont get a network admins role or a server admins role at least for a few years (after gaining credible experience) so it puts me squarely in a system support or helpdesk support category. Most problems will revolve around users having issues with word or excel or simply software bugs. I am hoping that ECDL will look positive on my CV rather tthan negative, if anyone has any thoughts on this let me know.

    Cheers,

    Ickle.
     
    Certifications: Bsc (Hons), Prince2 Foundation, Network+
  2. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    I suppose it depends on what level of job you're going for.
    If you're going for something high-level and you've got other more relevant qualifications, then don't bother with it.

    Generally though, anything you've got on your CV that the other guy doesn't is only going to be good!
    You see quite a lot of administrative non-IT jobs, especially in the public sector, ask for an ECDL as a basic requirement.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  3. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    From a tech viewpoint it wont boost you that much, but we all use office to document so its not a bad thing.

    I suppose in fairness a level of competancy in Office is assumed in IT, and support roles do cover supporting users office issues and their usage, so there is always a need, and this backs up you can use office to a reasonable level.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  4. steve_p1981

    steve_p1981 Byte Poster

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    my mother in law was going to register for the EDCL but was told that it's being phased out. I'd do some checks on this before going any further
     
    Certifications: A+ 220-701 and 220-702
    WIP: none at current but poss 70-680 soon
  5. ickle97116084

    ickle97116084 Bit Poster

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    I checked the official website for the ECDL which has no obvious indication of the ECDL withdrawal. This doesnt mean the ECDL will be around for the next few years just there is no indication from the BCS website reffereing to the immediate withdrawal. If I can pass the course within the next few months I may be one of the last few people to sit the exam!

    I am being offered the course for free including tuition fees and exam fees (all 7 modules). If I pass the modules this year I may move onto advanced courses and pursue associate membership of the BCS. It may not be a certification equivalent to say MCSE/A or CCNA but is a step toward gaining further knowledge in IT - at no extra cost on my part!

    May main question was with regard to an employers opinion on the accreditation, is it seen as a joke or taken seriously as an effective proof one is knoledgeable about desktop applications?

    Cheers

    Ickle
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011
    Certifications: Bsc (Hons), Prince2 Foundation, Network+
  6. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

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    It's seen as proof that you have the fundamental skills in using a PC and Office to carry out basic tasks such as word processing and creating spreadsheets.

    It may be seen as a joke if you're sending your CV to IBM or Microsoft, but if you're going into any job in the public sector or education it's a box they can tick.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  7. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    I wouldn't say it's a joke or would be seen as one, but it's a 'very' basic IT literacy qualification at the end of the day. Very low level to be honest. I doubt it would even register to any IT manager looking at a CV etc...

    I had to do the ECDL at one point years ago when working for my last employer as we were pushing the LearnDirect courses that helped people pass it. I sat all 7 modules in one morning and passed it without any revision at all. It's pretty elementry stuff ...

    If I were you, I'd ask them for something else instead (assuming that there is anything else you could do in the time you have left there).
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  8. ickle97116084

    ickle97116084 Bit Poster

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    "If I were you, I'd ask them for something else instead"

    Thats the problem, all funding has been spent on providing employees with the material and exam for the ECDL. There is absolutely no funding left to take another course.

    With that in mind is there any value in sitting the advanced ECDL and gailing the expert qualification and Associate membership to the BCS if I am not currently in a IT specific role?

    Ickle
     
    Certifications: Bsc (Hons), Prince2 Foundation, Network+
  9. ickle97116084

    ickle97116084 Bit Poster

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    "If I were you, I'd ask them for something else instead"

    Thats the problem, all funding has been spent on providing employees with the material and exam for the ECDL. There is absolutely no funding left to take another course.

    With that in mind is there any value in sitting the advanced ECDL and gailing the expert qualification and Associate membership to the BCS if I am not currently in a IT specific role?
     
    Certifications: Bsc (Hons), Prince2 Foundation, Network+
  10. geonetphil

    geonetphil New Member

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    GCSEs/ O levels have more merit than the ECDL. Hell, I can probably teach the ourse to a monkey. I've been in the IT industry doing first, second and some third line support for six years now, I have nothing higher than GCSEs and doing an ECDL wouldn't even cross my mind.
     
  11. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    Personally if that's all that was on offer and I was getting it for nothing, I'd do it. The I would put it on or leave it off my CV depending on the job I was going for.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
  12. j1mgg

    j1mgg Kilobyte Poster

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    I would see it as a cert that would help someone looking to become a PA or do administrative duties. I know the material is free and such but your time is and I think you would be better spending £100 on a book and exam for another cert.

    With the MCDST been withdrawn, i am not sure if there is a beginner cert for win7, but the A+ would compliment your network+ but not sure what you would think of that.
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, ITIL V3 Foundation, MCDST, 70-270, 70-290
    WIP: 70-291, security+ and SSCP
  13. ickle97116084

    ickle97116084 Bit Poster

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    Thanks all for your responses. After looking at the BCS progression route I might consider taking the ECDL expert exams and getting the assosciate membership to the BCS. A certification is great if you have experience in a particular area but with no experience assosciate membership title will probably look less like I am going into IT blindfolded. I do have 10 years working with Scientific Application, 5 of those years have been spent peforming software validation. In the scientific industry there is no qualification to achieve that suports this field. I guess the closest certification to this field of work is ISEB foundation in software testing, its very well suited to those testing in the finacial sector.

    I will get the ECDL and pick or choose to add the certification to my CV dependant on the job I apply for. Thanks for all your help.

    Ickle.
     
    Certifications: Bsc (Hons), Prince2 Foundation, Network+
  14. zxspectrum

    zxspectrum Gigabyte Poster Premium Member

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    Im actually doing this as we speak, ive already passed 3 out of the 7 mods, getting well passed the 75% you nee. I did it for 3 reasons 1st, you get to be a member of the BCS, which is 60 quid, ive noticed some employers asking for it as well, yes i know its admin based, but if you wanted a job badly, especially these days, it can be good to have, and 3rdly, i was bored, something to do, im still applying for jobs, but when looking it doesnt half make you depressed, so i did that to break things up.

    The tutor who does our course hates me as im always correcting her, especially on the security one lol. And another thing, shell be getting about 28 grand a year to teach that, i could do it and a lot better lol

    Ed
     
    Certifications: BSc computing and information systems
    WIP: 70-680

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