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What CBT course should I get?

Discussion in 'Networks' started by John Neerdael, Jan 24, 2009.

  1. John Neerdael

    John Neerdael Nibble Poster

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    I'm looking for a good CBT course to accompany the course we are having now in the classroom. We are basically now getting theory lessons about networking, starting from the basics; in other words what hubs/switches/repeaters/bridges and everything else are and how they work. Our teacher however isnt very experienced and I feel I would learn it quicker and better from a good CBT course. Unfortunately I have no idea what kind of course (or for what certification) I should look for that includes these basic theory lessons about networking. Is this maybe Comptia Network+ that I should look a course for?

    Thanks for any pending advice :)
     
    WIP: MCTS: 70-640
  2. Johnd76

    Johnd76 Megabyte Poster

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    I am Studying the network+ at the moment and i use the CBT Nuggets Network+, i think they are pretty good and they give all the information you need
     
    Certifications: MCP, MCDST
    WIP: Not a thing
  3. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Get the A+ one :D which one do you think you should get? The one that has networking in it or the one that doesn't?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  4. Wassup

    Wassup Byte Poster

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    if you are doing network theory, then the Network+ would be the way to go as a start.
    Either that or search around on youtube, using a key phrase, such as subnetting, network+ and the like.

    With that and a good book, all should become apparent .... eventually :)
     
  5. John Neerdael

    John Neerdael Nibble Poster

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    Yeh I'm using the Train Signal Network+ course now, almost halfway through already. Very interesting videos, I'm not really planning on going to do the Network+ exam but instead after working my way through this information start studying for either CCNA or MSCA, what are you guys suggesting I would take on, my teachers at school say both Cisco & MS certified people are in high demand. (CCNA seems a bit easier and faster to achieve then MS, but cost is also a factor for me till the summer at least)
     
    WIP: MCTS: 70-640
  6. Jiser

    Jiser Kilobyte Poster

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    I wouldn't say they are highly in demand, teachers etc sprout alot of BS. If you haven't got any real world experiance don't bother taking the ccna exam. Stick with the basics and work on gettign that first job. A+ N+ MCDST would do for now.

    I did half the CCNA 4 years ago, didn't understand it, just knew odd facts which got me through 2 semesters. Without experiance to back your certs up your worth not alot tbh.

    Home study all the way!
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), PGc, MCTS:Win 7, MCSA W7/MCITP EDST, ITIL Foundation, Prince 2 Foundation, C&G: Web Design, MOS 07: Excel, Word, Powerpoint, Outlook.
  7. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    I tend to agree. Even though I have my CCNA, I've never had any real use for it and wouldn't be able to use it in a commercial environment without relevant experience. I leave it off my CV (as I don't want to 'over-certify' myself) and I very much doubt I'll renew it until it's going to benefit me.

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  8. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Cisco and Microsoft certified people ARE in high demand... but only IF they've got real-world experience with the technology. Cisco and Microsoft certified people without experience are a dime a dozen. In fact, getting those advanced certifications before you've got experience can actually hurt your chances of getting your first IT job.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. John Neerdael

    John Neerdael Nibble Poster

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    I understand what you guys mean but I'm am following a 5 day a week course for about 8 months long which is a VERY practical course, we do learn to use cisco equipment and everything at school. What I find the course I'm following is lacking is theoretical knowledge, from self studying on the network+ cbt's I've learned alot of things over a short time. If there are more dutch people here feel free to take a look at my site where I write everything down I see, someone might find it usefull:

    http://mijnwiki.co.cc/doku.php?id=comptia:network

    Sometimes I dont know the correct translation to dutch so you might see some half dutch half english sentences on there :D Anyways I'm having a blast learning extra things and I think I'm picking up things fast and find I can put them in use in practical examples etc. I think some Cisco training would be handy for me to go through the year. We need to setup a virtual network for a example company aswell which ranges from installing firewalls, routers switches & everything that comes with it. AD/DNS/DHCP/VLAN's... So it's a whole lot of practical knowledge that is just so much better when you know the theory behind it aswell.
     
    WIP: MCTS: 70-640
  10. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Learning to administer Cisco equipment in a lab is a LOT different from administering Cisco equipment in a real-world IT environment. No amount of training can adequately prepare you for that.

    Don't get me wrong... learning Cisco stuff is great. But don't expect any of it to do you any good when pursuing your first IT job. No employer in their right mind is going to allow someone without IT experience to administer their network. But... your instructors aren't going to tell you that.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. John Neerdael

    John Neerdael Nibble Poster

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    Thanks alot Boson, so its useless for me to try and pursue anything before actually landing a job? I'm eager to learn and I'm learning alot every day that goes alot further then the scope of the study I have chosing.

    That said I realize troubleshooting when working in a real environment where you are constantly being put face to face to new problems is where most of any it'ers knowledge comes from but the basic has to be there I would suppose, I see most of the certifications as having a theoretical background on what your job is. Or am I completely wrong here (I know this doesnt go for some very heavy cert's that you can only get by having years of experience) but on what you see when you learn for Network+ & ICND1 I have to say it seems almost entirely made up of theory and I personally feel that learning those and actually going for a cert should show my future employer that I'm eager to learn and have a basic theory background of how everything works. Or do employers look differently on this?
     
    WIP: MCTS: 70-640
  12. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    it's not useless to learn something before you get a job it's useless to get a high level certification in a high level area before you get there. So certs like MCSA,MCSE and CCNA are specific to certain jobs and experience and having those certs without the required on the job experience can go against you. By all means learn the theory if you want but there's not much point in getting the certs unless you have the experience.

    Microsoft recommend 12-18 months of adminstering and supporting a 250+ user multi server environment before going anywhere near the MCSE, 6-12 months of being a network admin for the MCSA and no right minded IT manager is gonna let anyone loose on their network with CCNA and no experience.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  13. John Neerdael

    John Neerdael Nibble Poster

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    I'm nowhere near looking towards achieving a MCSA or CCNA before landing a job. I'm finishing school in june and I wanted to get maybe a 70-270 done for Windows XP and perhaps the ICND1 (CCENT) from Cisco. So just the starting areas, and then work my way up from there while being in a it job.
     
    WIP: MCTS: 70-640
  14. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    No, it's not useless to learn new things, but it's useless to pursue those advanced certifications this early in your career. I'd recommend you pursue the A+, Network+, and the MCDST, because those certifications are relevant to entry-level jobs.

    Yes, you are correct that certifications give you the theory and general knowledge about technologies... but what you're not understanding is that an entry-level job won't have anything to do with the ICND1.

    So let's say you get the CCENT (by passing the ICND1). Entry-level employers are going to think "This guy is Cisco certified, which has nothing to do with our entry-level position. He's either going to want too much money, or he's gonna get bored of this non-Cisco stuff and leave within a few months for something better/more relevant to his skillset." And they'll end up hiring someone who HAS entry-level-relevant certifications, like the A+. Thus, getting overcertified for your experience level can actually HURT your chances of getting your first IT job.

    You keep saying that those exams are "the starting areas", but those exams aren't "the start". The 70-270 is an MCSA-level exam. You should hold off on pursuing that until you've got a few months of experience administering XP in a domain environment. If you're looking for a relevant XP certification, pursue the MCDST.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  15. John Neerdael

    John Neerdael Nibble Poster

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    Thanks for taking the time for giving me more input, what would a first IT job always be? Is it always gonna be helpdesk? I kinda hope not :oops: I'm really looking forward to get my hands dirty.
     
    WIP: MCTS: 70-640
  16. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Typically, helpdesk, Level 1 tech, PC repair tech, field service tech, and some desktop support tech jobs. That's about as "dirty" as you're gonna get early on until you build some experience. Companies aren't gonna let you loose on their critical servers and routers from the get-go... particularly when there are experienced people out there who can do that sorta stuff without causing undue risk to the company's business processes.

    Everyone starts at the bottom... but nobody says you have to stay there forever. Take it one step at a time, and you'll build a strong IT career.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  17. BradSherwin

    BradSherwin New Member

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    Michael is right.

    Your learning to run before you can walk! I have just started my first IT job, I work on a help desk, I went to colege for 3 years. I have to stare at 2nd Line Technicians in jelously because thats where I want to be. But it is simply not going to happen overnight.

    For you to jump into a job where you have no experience is very dangerous. You have to comply with policies such as PCI compliance etc. Break policies and the company will get fined and its your a** being strung up in the meeting with the director - anyone inexperienced in IT is a risk. Having a qualifications doesn't mean you can do the job, you still require training in live environments. Someone with 3+ years experience or someone with Cisco & MS qualifications and no experience - who would get the job? Seriously.

    Take your time and you will get there. You obviously have the dedication to succeed in the IT industry, I hope future employers perceive it and you get that promotion to where you want to be.

    I'd rather be top of the bottom, than bottom of the top.
     
    Certifications: BTEC National Diploma
    WIP: CompITA A+ N+

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