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What are the benefits of Network+?

Discussion in 'Network+' started by zurih, Feb 25, 2006.

  1. zurih

    zurih Bit Poster

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    Hi I'm new around here.
    I just wonder, what are the benefits of Network+?

    I mean, if I want to have mcse or even ccna, why not go straight to them instead of going first for N+ and then to the other certs?

    Thanks
     
    WIP: CCNA, Network+
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Depends on what you intend to do. If it is just work on Cisco stuff, or on Windows, then probably there are no benefits.

    But if you work on a wide range of other stuff then the vendor-neutral Certs are a useful base.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Harry sums it up nicely there, but I will just add that the comptia certs provide a soild foundation on which to base further studies.

    As you're new why not pop across to the new members introduction forum and tell us a bit about yourself. We like to know the people that we work with! :biggrin
     
  4. zurih

    zurih Bit Poster

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I'm not new in networking.
    What I ment is are there any benifits for holding the cert besides the fundamental learning of networking?
     
    WIP: CCNA, Network+
  5. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Well - one of the benefits is that you can show something that proves you know the basics of networking, rather than hoping the next company will believe your CV! :biggrin

    Rather depends on how well known CompTIA is in your country. In the UK it is known and counts for something.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  6. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    That is an interesting question, to which I would have to say - Yes.

    It can serve to show employers that you take an interest in what you do and have and have an interest in progressing your skills beyond simply what you do on a daily basis.

    It is also something which can look good on a CV / resume to show potential employers that you have skills beyond that of a single vendor based certifcation.

    8)
     
  7. zurih

    zurih Bit Poster

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    thanks for the answers!
    I'll start with N+ with david groth I think.
    Is a good book right?
     
    WIP: CCNA, Network+
  8. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    Yes, the David Groth book seems to be the book for the Network+.

    Others also recommend the Mike Meyers book, but aparrently Groth has the edge when it comes to the Network+.

    8)
     
  9. zurih

    zurih Bit Poster

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    thanks!!
     
    WIP: CCNA, Network+
  10. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Since you're going for your Network+, if you already have (or will be going for your A+), those two certs combined are an elective for the MCSA. So instead of doing 4 exam all you'll have to do is 3 MS exams. That's if you decide to go down the MS route. Just another "bonus" doing Comptia certs.

    Just adding my 2 cents in :D
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  11. zurih

    zurih Bit Poster

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    I dont have A+ (yet), but maybe will do after N+.
    Can you tell me which test is spared in MCSA?

    Edit: I just read at microsoft.com:
    Certain specified CompTIA certifications can serve as alternatives to passing elective exams or specialization exams for select MCP certifications.

    * Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA)
    To receive an elective credit toward the MCSA certification, candidates must earn the CompTIA A+ credential and either the CompTIA Network+ credential or the CompTIA Server+ credential. Alternatively, candidates can earn the CompTIA Security+ credential.
    * Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE)
    To receive an elective credit toward the MCSE certification, candidates can earn the CompTIA Security+ credential.
    * MCSA: Security
    To receive a specialization credit toward the MCSA: Security certification, candidates can earn the CompTIA Security+ credential.
    * MCSE: Security
    To receive a specialization credit toward the MCSE: Security certification, candidates can earn the CompTIA Security+ credential.

    So that means that I can take Security+ alone, and it will be as good as A+ and N+ combined.
    So maybe S+ is prefered ?
     
    WIP: CCNA, Network+
  12. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Hi zurih,

    If you want to get a security cert, go for it. According to Microsoft the security+ is an elective for the MCSA 2003. Exam wise it would only 1 exam you do with Comptia instead of 3 (2 for the A+, 1 for the N+).

    When you ask "So that means that I can take Security+ alone, and it will be as good as A+ and N+ combined.
    So maybe S+ is prefered?" do you mean as an elective or do you mean something else?

    Whichever way you decide to go, good luck.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  13. zurih

    zurih Bit Poster

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    thanks for the reply.
    I think I'll go first with N+, and than A+. MCSA is not a subject for me right now.
    I rather get a general networking cert plus a general computer technician cert than S+. Its worth it.

    EDIT: What about MCDST? what are the pros and cons of it against A+?
    :)
     
    WIP: CCNA, Network+
  14. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    The MCDST is a MS cert, it looks purely at MS technologies, and how you would go about resolving issues with them.

    If you are looking to get a broad base set of certifications then the MCDST is definately something that you should think of doing, but I would go for it along side the A+ / Network+ purely for the benefit of showing employers that you can work with different technologies, and aren't purely focused on a single one.

    If you haven't already looked at it you may find that this thread helps to answer some of your questions. This one and that one certainly seem related to me.

    8)
     

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