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WAP and DHCP

Discussion in 'Wireless' started by Stoney, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. Stoney

    Stoney Megabyte Poster

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    Hi,

    Could someone be so kind as to clarify something that has been puzzling me.

    If you have a DHCP server on a network, and then you attach a WAP somewhere on the network behind the DHCP, does the WAP still have to have DHCP enabled for pc's that want to connect through a wireless connection?

    Or do the pc's that connect through wireless obtain their IP address through the DHCP server, but via the WAP.

    Thanks,

    Paul
     
    Certifications: 25 + 50 metre front crawl
    WIP: MCSA - Exam 70-270
  2. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    The second option is the answer.

    Explanation when I get time! :dry
     
  3. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Simon is correct.

    The WAP in this case acts as an Ethernet bridge between the wired Ethernet side and the WiFi side. So you must *not* enable any DHCP server in the WAP.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  4. Stoney

    Stoney Megabyte Poster

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    Yeah that's what i thought, but I can't seem to use the WAP and connect to the LAN without assigning a static IP to the pc. I tried looking for a bridging setting but the only one available was bridging the internet with a public network, which doesn't really fit into what I want.

    And once I have access to the LAN (using static IP) I can't use the internet connection that comes in from the LAN, as opposed to the direct internet connection that can be plumbed straight into the back of the WAP.

    I'm sure i'm missing something somewhere :blink
     
    Certifications: 25 + 50 metre front crawl
    WIP: MCSA - Exam 70-270
  5. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Don't forget that the WAP itself usualy needs an IP, and it must get it via DHCP. It should not be fixed unless you mark it as fixed in the DHCP server.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  6. Stoney

    Stoney Megabyte Poster

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    Ahh, that may be where I am going wrong. I assigned a static IP to the WAP outside of the DHCP range but didn't tell the DHCP server I had done so.

    Btw, does that apply to all routers (needing an IP assigned from DHCP) or just WAP's?
     
    Certifications: 25 + 50 metre front crawl
    WIP: MCSA - Exam 70-270
  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    *Anything* on a network where DHCP is involved needs to either:

    1) Get it's IP from DHCP, or

    2) If it needs to be static have its details marked in the DHCP server *if* that IP is in the DHCP range.

    There are no exceptions!

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  8. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I think that if you want to get this working, you will need to give more information..

    What device is acting as the DHCP server?

    What IP configuration is the DHCP server leasing out?

    What is the operating system of the client?

    What IP address info does the client have when it can connect?

    What IP address info does the client have when it can't connect?

    If it's Windows 2000 or XP, you can find out by typing IPCONFIG /ALL at the command prompt.

    If you want to paste the info here you can direct the output to a text file..

    IPCONFIG /ALL > c:\config.txt

    Open C:\config.txt in Notepad, select all and copy - then paste it in your reply!
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  9. Nelix
    Honorary Member

    Nelix Gigabyte Poster

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    When I set up my DHCP server at home I started it from xxx.xxx.xxx.x20 to xxx.xxx.xxx.x50, a slightly larger range than I need but there you go. The reason I did this was so that I could use xxx.xxx.xxx.xx1 to xxx.xxx.xxx.x19 for devices that require a Static address such as printer, servers and Access Points etc, I have not entered any of the static ip information in my dhcp server and everything works fine. this is a similar way to how we do things at the office.

    Nelix
     
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  10. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    The above is a good description of one of the ways of doing this, and probably the easiest to setup.

    Another way, if the DHCP server allows it, is to mark the whole of the network as available, and then put in exceptions for specific MAC addresses. This works well if you are tight on IP addresses, and is what I use at home.

    Hrary.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  11. Stoney

    Stoney Megabyte Poster

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    I thought that was the case. I was just checking I hadn't missed some fundamental part of IP configuration somewhere.

    Nelix: I have found a similar setup in some of the stuff we have at work. Although I prefer to use the DHCP range purely for DHCP and assign static IP's outside of that range.

    Bluerinse: I'll keep trying and may post up some details if I still can't get it working.
     
    Certifications: 25 + 50 metre front crawl
    WIP: MCSA - Exam 70-270

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